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Proposition 48

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By Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney and Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney,Staff Writers | July 22, 1992
Michael Lloyd and Donta Bright, Dunbar High's two McDonald's All-Americans, will not be eligible to play during the 1992-93 college basketball season because they failed to score the minimum on entrance exams required by NCAA Proposition 48.Proposition 48 requires all incoming college freshmen to have a 2.0 grade-point average and a minimum score on either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (700) or the American College Test (17) in order to compete in NCAA Division I sports. Lloyd and Bright had 2.0s, but did not meet the requirements on the SAT or ACT.After leading Dunbar to a 29-0 record and the nation's No. 1 ranking, Lloyd signed with Arkansas and Bright signed with Massachusetts.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1998
NEW YORK -- There has always been an air of expectancy about the Big East tournament since it first came to Madison Square Garden; the atmosphere similar to that of a heavyweight fight. A seat to the semifinals was the toughest ticket in town.One thing was obvious last night: It's not 1985 anymore.That's the last time the Big East was the biggest player in college basketball's landscape, the new kid who quickly became king. That was the year the then six-year-old league sent three teams to the Final Four and a fourth to the Sweet 16.It was the league of dominant teams with oodles of talent among its players, a league that boasted experienced stars and future NBA stalwarts such as Chris Mullin and Patrick Ewing, as well as a play ground legend named Pearl Washington.
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NEWS
October 22, 1993
The Black Coaches Association met the other day with the Congressional Black Caucus to discuss ways of changing some of the regulations and practices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The coaches feel that blacks have been excluded from leadership roles in the NCAA, and that decisions regarding such things as the size of staffs and the number of scholarships have been harmful to black youths.Many of the items on the black coaches' bill of particulars are right on target, but one is not. That is their opposition to raising admissions standards for athletes.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Derek Toney | April 29, 1997
St. Frances' Mark Karcher, The Sun's two-time All-Metro basketball Player of the Year, has scheduled a 2: 15 p.m. news conference for today at the East Baltimore school, where he is expected to sign a letter of intent to attend Temple.The Philadelphia Daily News and Philadelphia Inquirer reported today that Karcher, a 6-foot-5 swingman, will attend Temple.College and recruiting sources say Karcher, who has not yet met the requirements for freshman eligibility, was strongly influenced by Owls coach John Chaney's success with Proposition 48 players.
SPORTS
May 9, 1991
Prop. 48 cases down in Div. I, up in IIThe percentage of freshman athletes sidelined by Proposition 48 academic standards dropped this year in Division I schools but rose sharply in Division II, the National Collegiate Athletic Association said yesterday.The NCAA said the percentage of black Proposition 48s in Division I rose from 65.5 percent from 1987 to 1989 to 68.6 percent this year. In Division II, blacks were 58.5 percent of total Proposition 48 freshmen this year, up from 45.4 percent in 1989 and 49.7 percent in 1988.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- Seventeen years ago, Stacy Robinson Sr. scored 20 points in the Capital Classic high school all-star game, and it seemed a given that his son, who shares his name and his talent in basketball, would follow in his footsteps.But because he was academically ineligible to play at Lanham's DuVal High this past winter, Stacy Robinson Jr. lost a chance to join his father in the game's history books.PTC More importantly, Robinson, one of four celebrated recruits for next season's Maryland team, might have squandered a chance to join his friend, DeMatha point guard Duane Simpkins, on the Terrapins roster because he might not have either the grade-point average or Scholastic Aptitude Test score to be admitted.
SPORTS
By Sam Davis | May 2, 1991
Devin Gray, the area's top high school basketball recruit, made his college choice official yesterday by signing a letter of intent with Clemson."I felt comfortable with them," said Gray, a 6-foot-7 forward at St. Frances. "I like the school, and I like the ratio of graduations [four players graduated last year, and four are on schedule to graduate next month]."Gray narrowed his final list to six before choosing Clemson. The other finalists were Maryland, Towson State, Minnesota, Richmond and St. John's.
SPORTS
By M..G. Missanelli and M..G. Missanelli,Knight-Ridder | January 9, 1992
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- The forces of reform won a major victory at the NCAA Convention yesterday when representatives of Division I schools voted overwhelmingly to establish the toughest academic standards in the history of college sports.A key proposal that would increase required grade-point averages for incoming student-athletes from 2.0 to 2.5 passed by a vote of 249 to 72 (with five abstentions), over the bitter objection of those who charged that the legislation discriminates against students from lower socio-economic environments.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | July 14, 1991
His athletic career never became what he had hoped when he entered Clemson in 1986, but, on May 10, there wasn't a happier student at the South Carolina school than former Dunbar High star Sean Tyson.It was on that date that Tyson -- the only Proposition 48 basketball player in the history of the Atlantic Coast Conference -- graduated with a degree in travel and tourism."It's definitely my proudest accomplishment. It was gratifying for my mom, and also for my brother," said Tyson of his family members who attended graduation.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Derek Toney | April 29, 1997
St. Frances' Mark Karcher, The Sun's two-time All-Metro basketball Player of the Year, has scheduled a 2: 15 p.m. news conference for today at the East Baltimore school, where he is expected to sign a letter of intent to attend Temple.The Philadelphia Daily News and Philadelphia Inquirer reported today that Karcher, a 6-foot-5 swingman, will attend Temple.College and recruiting sources say Karcher, who has not yet met the requirements for freshman eligibility, was strongly influenced by Owls coach John Chaney's success with Proposition 48 players.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Staff Writer | August 28, 1995
During the 1995-96 academic year, The Sun will track the progress of six athletes who are seniors at area high schools. In addition to their accomplishments on the field, we will write about their work in the classroom as they strive to meet the NCAA's tougher academic standards.Dunbar's Tommy Polley may be the perfect argument for opponents of the NCAA's new tougher freshman eligibility standards, called Proposition 16.The 6-foot-5, 200-pound senior linebacker has made the honor roll frequently and seems to handle the rigors of sports and academics.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
During the University of Arkansas' drive to the national championship last spring, coach Nolan Richardson used the winners' podium as a pulpit. He extolled the virtues of opportunity, and condemned college presidents bent on passing regulations he felt would have a disastrous impact on some females, many minority group athletes and low-income whites.Eight months later, as college football enters its final weekend and college basketball shifts into high gear, the fierce tug-of-war over access to higher education by athletes has intensified.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After meeting for more than two hours yesterday at Georgetown University with the executive board of the Black Coaches Association, NCAA executive director Cedric Dempsey said that he hoped the continuing dialogue will help alleviate some of the group's concerns.Those concerns are over issues such as minority-hiring practices, freshman eligibility requirements and the access its members have to their respective communities."There are some strong emotions falling on both sides," said Dempsey.
NEWS
October 22, 1993
The Black Coaches Association met the other day with the Congressional Black Caucus to discuss ways of changing some of the regulations and practices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The coaches feel that blacks have been excluded from leadership roles in the NCAA, and that decisions regarding such things as the size of staffs and the number of scholarships have been harmful to black youths.Many of the items on the black coaches' bill of particulars are right on target, but one is not. That is their opposition to raising admissions standards for athletes.
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney and Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney,Staff Writers | July 22, 1992
Michael Lloyd and Donta Bright, Dunbar High's two McDonald's All-Americans, will not be eligible to play during the 1992-93 college basketball season because they failed to score the minimum on entrance exams required by NCAA Proposition 48.Proposition 48 requires all incoming college freshmen to have a 2.0 grade-point average and a minimum score on either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (700) or the American College Test (17) in order to compete in NCAA Division I sports. Lloyd and Bright had 2.0s, but did not meet the requirements on the SAT or ACT.After leading Dunbar to a 29-0 record and the nation's No. 1 ranking, Lloyd signed with Arkansas and Bright signed with Massachusetts.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
COLLEGE PARK -- Seventeen years ago, Stacy Robinson Sr. scored 20 points in the Capital Classic high school all-star game, and it seemed a given that his son, who shares his name and his talent in basketball, would follow in his footsteps.But because he was academically ineligible to play at Lanham's DuVal High this past winter, Stacy Robinson Jr. lost a chance to join his father in the game's history books.PTC More importantly, Robinson, one of four celebrated recruits for next season's Maryland team, might have squandered a chance to join his friend, DeMatha point guard Duane Simpkins, on the Terrapins roster because he might not have either the grade-point average or Scholastic Aptitude Test score to be admitted.
SPORTS
By Danny Robbins and Danny Robbins,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 1992
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Having attained most of the reform goals they had set for this year's NCAA Convention, the leaders of college athletics are ready to focus on next year's key reform issue -- a program of certification or accreditation for athletic programs."
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
During the University of Arkansas' drive to the national championship last spring, coach Nolan Richardson used the winners' podium as a pulpit. He extolled the virtues of opportunity, and condemned college presidents bent on passing regulations he felt would have a disastrous impact on some females, many minority group athletes and low-income whites.Eight months later, as college football enters its final weekend and college basketball shifts into high gear, the fierce tug-of-war over access to higher education by athletes has intensified.
SPORTS
By Danny Robbins and Danny Robbins,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 1992
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Having attained most of the reform goals they had set for this year's NCAA Convention, the leaders of college athletics are ready to focus on next year's key reform issue -- a program of certification or accreditation for athletic programs."
SPORTS
By M..G. Missanelli and M..G. Missanelli,Knight-Ridder | January 9, 1992
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- The forces of reform won a major victory at the NCAA Convention yesterday when representatives of Division I schools voted overwhelmingly to establish the toughest academic standards in the history of college sports.A key proposal that would increase required grade-point averages for incoming student-athletes from 2.0 to 2.5 passed by a vote of 249 to 72 (with five abstentions), over the bitter objection of those who charged that the legislation discriminates against students from lower socio-economic environments.
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