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Proposition 209

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NEWS
December 4, 1996
THE DECISION of a federal judge to temporarily void the vote that made Proposition 209 the law in California illustrates the complexity of affirmative action. Chief U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson of San Francisco has set a Dec. 16 hearing. He based his preliminary invalidation of Proposition 209 on his belief that the Supreme Court will ultimately strike down the "California Civil Rights Initiative" as discriminatory against women and minorities.That's a confusing assessment, since the supposedly anti-discrimination measure says the "state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education or public contracting."
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 1999
DEL MAR, Calif. -- Joe Canales threw his burly arms around Gov. George W. Bush in a tight abrazo as the Republican presidential candidate made his way through the crowd at a Southern California county fair here yesterday.Canales, a 43-year-old father of nine, is a registered Democrat. But he will embrace Bush's candidacy if the Texas governor becomes the Republican nominee next year."I know he's going after the Hispanic vote, and I think he's going to get it," says Canales, who owns a security company in Vista, Calif.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Three nights ago, California's Proposition 209 -- a legal juggernaut against affirmative action -- reached another community, ending much of the city of Santa Cruz's plan to assure minorities and women more jobs on the city payroll and in private industry.The City Council there, firmly opposed to Proposition 209 and hoping that it will someday be struck down, gave in reluctantly but unanimously. The city did not want to spend the tax dollars needed to pay for a court fight seeking to save its affirmative-action plan, City Attorney John G. Barisone said.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | November 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Giving opponents of affirmative action a major boost, the Supreme Court yesterday turned back a constitutional challenge to Proposition 209, California's ban on race and sex preferences in state education, employment and contracts.The court's three-sentence order did not directly endorse Proposition 209, and it set no precedent. But the action had the practical effect of giving supporters of similar measures elsewhere at least a year to dismantle other affirmative action plans.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The high-stakes constitutional battle over HTC California's Proposition 209, a statewide ban on affirmative action, reached the Supreme Court yesterday as opponents asked that its enforcement be halted.Fearing the resegregation of many state and local government programs that have been opened to women and minorities, civil rights groups and San Francisco argued that the ban "will result in upheaval at all levels of local and state government." The measure might even end school desegregation, they told the court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court refused yesterday to interfere, for the time being, with California's sweeping ban on government affirmative action programs that give special benefits to minorities and women.In a one-sentence order, and without dissent, the court said it would not block implementation of the controversial California initiative, called Proposition 209, during the time the justices ponder a constitutional challenge to it by civil rights groups.The court appeared not to have been convinced that minorities and women would soon suffer dire effects in state jobs, college admissions or public contracts if Proposition 209 continues to be enforced in coming months.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | November 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Giving opponents of affirmative action a major boost, the Supreme Court yesterday turned back a constitutional challenge to Proposition 209, California's ban on race and sex preferences in state education, employment and contracts.The court's three-sentence order did not directly endorse Proposition 209, and it set no precedent. But the action had the practical effect of giving supporters of similar measures elsewhere at least a year to dismantle other affirmative action plans.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a dramatic victory for opponents of affirmative action, a federal appeals court upheld yesterday the constitutionality of California's Proposition 209, a wide-ranging ban on preferences for women and minorities in the state's programs and education.Ruling unanimously that states have broad power to undo affirmative action that bestows special advantages based on race and sex, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals cleared the way for enforcement of one of the most far-reaching social experiments in years.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 28, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- In Bob Dole's uphill fight against President Clinton for California's 54 electoral votes, the Republican presidential nominee is looking for help from two favorite "wedge" issues of Gov. Pete Wilson -- immigration and affirmative action.But neither one now appears likely to save Dole here on election day, simply because a strong California economy is buoying Clinton's consistent popularity in the state and overshadowing divisions that are at the heart of the debates over these two issues.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge temporarily barred California yesterday from putting into effect a measure approved by voters there to wipe out most affirmative action by government agencies and colleges in the nation's largest state.Chief U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson of San Francisco, taking the first formal action in a case almost certainly bound for the Supreme Court, said that Proposition 209 would probably be struck down as unconstitutional.He suggested that the challengers would be able to prove that the measure discriminates against women and members of minority groups because it targets only those affirmative action programs that benefit those two groups.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Three nights ago, California's Proposition 209 -- a legal juggernaut against affirmative action -- reached another community, ending much of the city of Santa Cruz's plan to assure minorities and women more jobs on the city payroll and in private industry.The City Council there, firmly opposed to Proposition 209 and hoping that it will someday be struck down, gave in reluctantly but unanimously. The city did not want to spend the tax dollars needed to pay for a court fight seeking to save its affirmative-action plan, City Attorney John G. Barisone said.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Jesse Jackson's Niagara of ill-chosen words in defense of racial preferences in California and against the truncation of self-government in the District of Columbia echo episodes in American history.In November 1996 California's electorate passed Proposition 209, banning racial preferences by governmental agencies. Then for 10 months opponents of 209 tried to get courts to block this result of direct democracy. They argued that a ban on unequal treatment of the races under a system of preferences violates the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the laws.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court refused yesterday to interfere, for the time being, with California's sweeping ban on government affirmative action programs that give special benefits to minorities and women.In a one-sentence order, and without dissent, the court said it would not block implementation of the controversial California initiative, called Proposition 209, during the time the justices ponder a constitutional challenge to it by civil rights groups.The court appeared not to have been convinced that minorities and women would soon suffer dire effects in state jobs, college admissions or public contracts if Proposition 209 continues to be enforced in coming months.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The high-stakes constitutional battle over HTC California's Proposition 209, a statewide ban on affirmative action, reached the Supreme Court yesterday as opponents asked that its enforcement be halted.Fearing the resegregation of many state and local government programs that have been opened to women and minorities, civil rights groups and San Francisco argued that the ban "will result in upheaval at all levels of local and state government." The measure might even end school desegregation, they told the court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a dramatic victory for opponents of affirmative action, a federal appeals court upheld yesterday the constitutionality of California's Proposition 209, a wide-ranging ban on preferences for women and minorities in the state's programs and education.Ruling unanimously that states have broad power to undo affirmative action that bestows special advantages based on race and sex, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals cleared the way for enforcement of one of the most far-reaching social experiments in years.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | December 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The chief federal judge in the San Francisco district is forcing California and the nation to take another look at public efforts to ban affirmative- action programs -- and at what a majority can and cannot do in America.Judge Thelton Henderson has ruled that California's ''Proposition 209,'' which forbids affirmative action in public employment, education and contracting, cannot be enforced until a higher court overrules his assertion that the referendum ''is probably unconstitutional.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 24, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dealing another blow to opponents of affirmative action, a federal judge yesterday blocked enforcement of Proposition 209 indefinitely, ruling that the initiative passed by 54 percent of California voters is probably unconstitutional.U.S. District Court Judge Thelton E. Henderson granted a preliminary injunction that prevents the state from implementing the November ballot measure pending a trial or ruling on its legality."It is not for this or any other court to lightly upset the expectations of the voters," Henderson wrote in a 67-page ruling.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | December 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The chief federal judge in the San Francisco district is forcing California and the nation to take another look at public efforts to ban affirmative- action programs -- and at what a majority can and cannot do in America.Judge Thelton Henderson has ruled that California's ''Proposition 209,'' which forbids affirmative action in public employment, education and contracting, cannot be enforced until a higher court overrules his assertion that the referendum ''is probably unconstitutional.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 24, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dealing another blow to opponents of affirmative action, a federal judge yesterday blocked enforcement of Proposition 209 indefinitely, ruling that the initiative passed by 54 percent of California voters is probably unconstitutional.U.S. District Court Judge Thelton E. Henderson granted a preliminary injunction that prevents the state from implementing the November ballot measure pending a trial or ruling on its legality."It is not for this or any other court to lightly upset the expectations of the voters," Henderson wrote in a 67-page ruling.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Plunging into a contentious legal and political arena, the White House announced yesterday that the administration had decided to join a challenge to the constitutionality of a successful California ballot initiative that bans affirmative action programs by the state and its local governments.The Justice Department had recommended the administration's intervention after concluding that the ballot initiative, Proposition 209, approved by California's voters last month, violated the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment.
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