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Proposition 187

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NEWS
August 27, 1998
Harold W. Ezell, 61, the co-author of California's controversial Proposition 187 and a vocal advocate of immigration reform, died of liver cancer Tuesday in Newport Beach, Calif. He helped draft Proposition 187, which sought to eliminate publicly funded education and most health care services to undocumented immigrants. The measure passed in November 1994 but was later ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge.John R. Williams, 88, who helped propel Republicans to statewide power and was the first Arizona governor to serve a four-year term, died Monday in Phoenix.
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NEWS
August 27, 1998
Harold W. Ezell, 61, the co-author of California's controversial Proposition 187 and a vocal advocate of immigration reform, died of liver cancer Tuesday in Newport Beach, Calif. He helped draft Proposition 187, which sought to eliminate publicly funded education and most health care services to undocumented immigrants. The measure passed in November 1994 but was later ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge.John R. Williams, 88, who helped propel Republicans to statewide power and was the first Arizona governor to serve a four-year term, died Monday in Phoenix.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 30, 1994
Washington -- Justice William Brennan, asked if he regretted any decision he had rendered during his 34 years on the Supreme Court, replied, ''Hell no, I never thought that I was wrong.'' And he always thought he had a right to impose social policies he considered right. Today's national debate about California's Proposition 187, which would deny free public education and some other non-emergency public services to illegal immigrants, arises from damage done by Brennan's, and the court's, hubris.
NEWS
December 4, 1996
THE DECISION of a federal judge to temporarily void the vote that made Proposition 209 the law in California illustrates the complexity of affirmative action. Chief U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson of San Francisco has set a Dec. 16 hearing. He based his preliminary invalidation of Proposition 209 on his belief that the Supreme Court will ultimately strike down the "California Civil Rights Initiative" as discriminatory against women and minorities.That's a confusing assessment, since the supposedly anti-discrimination measure says the "state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education or public contracting."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- California voters took a constitutional dare Tuesday, enacting a sweeping attack on illegal immigrants' rights, but two judges reacted swiftly yesterday and blocked Proposition 187 as protesters massed in the streets.In the face of arguments that the move to take away most public benefits for illegal aliens in California might be struck down in court, the state's voters approved the measure by 59 percent to 41 percent.Proposition 187 already has sparked street protests in California, as well as an anti-American protest at a McDonald's restaurant in Mexico City.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1995
The buttons shipped from Don F. Barrington's Arizona apartment are popping up on lapels from New Mexico to Minnesota to Florida. In patriotic red, white and blue they offer a solution to the country's immigration crisis -- USA 187.JoAnn Peart received hers about two weeks ago. She has never met Mr. Barrington. But the mother of two from Delray Beach, Fla., and the disabled veteran from Tucson share a common goal: a national moratorium on immigration. And they support referendum movements in their home states that would ban services for illegal aliens.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 17, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- In one of the largest mass protests in the city's history, a column of nearly 70,000 demonstrators more than a mile long marched downtown yesterday to protest Proposition 187, an anti-illegal immigration initiative, and its principal advocate, California Gov. Pete Wilson."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 20, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Immigrants in California, shaken by Proposition 187 denying certain benefits to them and by plans in Congress to cut others, are seeking a solution they have often ignored in the past -- American citizenship.Officials of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service here are reporting a record rate of applications being filed for (P beginning the naturalization process.According to Richard Rogers, director for the Los Angeles District, largest in the country, about 2,300 applications a day are flowing into his office.
NEWS
By Gary Delgado | July 25, 1994
AMERICA'S war on immigration knows no bounds, and the California ballot initiative code-named "Save Our State" is the most mean-spirited action yet.Under Proposition 187, undocumented immigrants would not have access to social services. Unless such immigrants can prove citizenship or legal residency, they will be denied access to public schools, colleges, universities and publicly funded health services -- including perinatal and immunization services. Proposition 187 would also turn public employees into snitches.
NEWS
November 7, 1994
Voting on state initiatives usually has local political implications only, but the vote on what Californians call Prop 187 will have national impact. It bans education, health and employment benefits for illegal aliens.Recently there has been prominent bi-partisan opposition to the initiative. Jack Kemp, who is pondering seeking the Republican presidential nomination, and William Bennett, a leading Republican idea man, came out against it. So did President Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.
NEWS
By RUBEN NAVARRETTE JR | June 11, 1995
President Clinton's pledge to expedite deportation of as many as 100,000 illegal immigrants, most of them Latino, may imperil his administration's relationship with those segments of the Latino community who have been his most loyal supporters. Of all the political measures that can be employed toward the legitimate goal of curtailing illegal immigration -- from stricter border enforcement to employer sanctions to identification cards to state initiatives such as California's Proposition 187 -- nothing is more troubling to many Latinos, particularly those of the World War II generation, than the "D-word."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 20, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Immigrants in California, shaken by Proposition 187 denying certain benefits to them and by plans in Congress to cut others, are seeking a solution they have often ignored in the past -- American citizenship.Officials of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service here are reporting a record rate of applications being filed for (P beginning the naturalization process.According to Richard Rogers, director for the Los Angeles District, largest in the country, about 2,300 applications a day are flowing into his office.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | February 14, 1995
The buttons shipped from Don F. Barrington's Arizona apartment are popping up on lapels from New Mexico to Minnesota to Florida. In patriotic red, white and blue they offer a solution to the country's immigration crisis -- USA 187.JoAnn Peart received hers about two weeks ago. She has never met Mr. Barrington. But the mother of two from Delray Beach, Fla., and the disabled veteran from Tucson share a common goal: a national moratorium on immigration. And they support referendum movements in their home states that would ban services for illegal aliens.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 23, 1994
Huntington Park, Calif. -- At first blush, Huntington Park looks like any other high school, if you don't count the palm trees dotting the sprawling campus. The kids certainly look the same. Nirvana T-shirts, Lakers caps and whatever else the mythic Head Teen has ordered for the day.You'd have to look very closely to see the anger and the fear.The problem is, it's unlikely you'd get close enough. Huntington Park is part of Greater L.A., but not so you'd notice.It's that part of town you might call drive-over land.
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | November 20, 1994
When the Rio Grande flows into Mexico it becomes the Rio Bravo. But it is the same river: One can debate who stole the most water from it. Or who is legally entitled to it. The river doesn't care.The vast majority of the undocumented people who flow north into the United States are from Mexico. By the time they cross the border into the United States, they have different names as well.In Mexico they have the traditional twin Spanish surnames reflecting the paternal and maternal family lines.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Roman Catholic bishops yesterday condemned California's Proposition 187, which denies health and education benefits to undocumented immigrants, and reaffirmed the Catholic Church's position that every person has a right to health care until the moment he dies.However, doctors may give pain medication to a terminally ill person even if it indirectly hastens his death -- as long as the sole goal is patient comfort, the bishops said.At the heart of both actions is the belief that all people have a basic human right to health care, said the 280 bishops, here on the last day of their semiannual meeting.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 23, 1994
Huntington Park, Calif. -- At first blush, Huntington Park looks like any other high school, if you don't count the palm trees dotting the sprawling campus. The kids certainly look the same. Nirvana T-shirts, Lakers caps and whatever else the mythic Head Teen has ordered for the day.You'd have to look very closely to see the anger and the fear.The problem is, it's unlikely you'd get close enough. Huntington Park is part of Greater L.A., but not so you'd notice.It's that part of town you might call drive-over land.
NEWS
By RUBEN NAVARRETTE JR | June 11, 1995
President Clinton's pledge to expedite deportation of as many as 100,000 illegal immigrants, most of them Latino, may imperil his administration's relationship with those segments of the Latino community who have been his most loyal supporters. Of all the political measures that can be employed toward the legitimate goal of curtailing illegal immigration -- from stricter border enforcement to employer sanctions to identification cards to state initiatives such as California's Proposition 187 -- nothing is more troubling to many Latinos, particularly those of the World War II generation, than the "D-word."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- California voters took a constitutional dare Tuesday, enacting a sweeping attack on illegal immigrants' rights, but two judges reacted swiftly yesterday and blocked Proposition 187 as protesters massed in the streets.In the face of arguments that the move to take away most public benefits for illegal aliens in California might be struck down in court, the state's voters approved the measure by 59 percent to 41 percent.Proposition 187 already has sparked street protests in California, as well as an anti-American protest at a McDonald's restaurant in Mexico City.
NEWS
November 7, 1994
Voting on state initiatives usually has local political implications only, but the vote on what Californians call Prop 187 will have national impact. It bans education, health and employment benefits for illegal aliens.Recently there has been prominent bi-partisan opposition to the initiative. Jack Kemp, who is pondering seeking the Republican presidential nomination, and William Bennett, a leading Republican idea man, came out against it. So did President Clinton and Attorney General Janet Reno.
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