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Proposed Tax

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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proposal to raise cigarette taxes by 75 cents a pack may put the smoker's adage of walking a mile for a Camel to the ultimate test.At $3 to $4 a pack, teens and young adults -- the most price-sensitive group of potential smokers -- are more likely to avoid smoking, say health experts in California and Canada, where hefty cigarette taxes have been imposed.This is just one of the many likely impacts on American society of the proposed cigarette tax.With little empirical evidence at hand, experts and professionals are looking to Canada and, to a lesser extent, California to gauge the social impact of Mr. Clinton's proposed tax.Canada implemented federal excise taxes on cigarettes almost 10 years ago and has been increasing the amount incrementally ever since.
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NEWS
May 24, 2014
Republican Ron George releases the first commercial in his campaign for governor, an introductory spot that also chronicles his opposition to tax increases. What the ad says : George a two-term state delegate from Anne Arundel County, is shown with family members and at a jewelry store he owns in Annapolis. In one frame, he is with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is raising an arm and smiling, though Ehrlich has not endorsed anyone in the race for governor. "He did not aspire to be in government, but when his community called, he stepped up to the plate," a voice-over says.
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NEWS
February 1, 2014
The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ( "City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27). I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.)
NEWS
February 1, 2014
The city's proposed 10-cent bag tax was unwarranted and burdensome to the citizens of Baltimore ( "City Council votes down 10-cent bag fee," Jan 27). I along with most of my neighbors in Belair-Edison reuse or recycle our plastic and paper bags. The disposable bags are a hygienic necessity for those with small children, invalids or pets. We also use them to store and carry items. (For example, most of the food donated by individuals to food banks for the poor is in plastic bags.)
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Some senior citizens in Baltimore County would receive relief from rising property taxes under a proposal by two county lawmakers. The proposal calls for a tax credit worth $160 per house in the first year for county residents 65 or older who qualify for the state's homeowners property tax credit program. The credit, which would be indexed to increase with inflation, would be added to whatever county residents receive under the state program, which is limited to people with a household income of $60,000 or less and a net worth of $200,000 or less.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
IN THE debate over Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley's proposed tax package, the arguments, pro and con, turn on the city's progress. The mayor says the additional revenue generated by new or higher energy, phone and recordation taxes will enable the city to continue its strides in reducing violent crime, improving school performance and keeping the city clean. Raising those taxes, say some City Council members, will impede the city's progress. "A real dent" is how Council President Sheila Dixon characterized the impact.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 9, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The proposed tax package making the rounds in Annapolis includes across-the-board increases in both income and sales taxes that would affect nearly every consumer and business in the state.But the $623.4 million plan advanced by Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery, the chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, also includes more modest proposals that nonetheless would hit certain industries, and their customers, harder than others.Telephone companies, auto repair shops and insurance companies are among those targeted for new taxes.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1995
Carroll's state lawmakers say that only one of the 10 proposals the County Commissioners will deliver to the General Assembly delegation tomorrow is likely to generate any controversy. A proposed real estate transfer tate the proposed tax could generate about $2.5 million in additional revenue.But the proposal for a tax, which could be put to referendum, is raising hackles.Del. Richard N. Dixon, Carroll's only Democrat in the General Assembly, said, "I don't think our delegation will go for the tax. I am opposed to any and all kinds of new taxes."
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | March 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Senate has narrowly voted to raise taxes by $245 million in an action that fit the classic definition of a compromise: It made no one happy.Senators who voted yesterday, and the delegates who will be on the tax hot seat next, complained the tax plan was too big, or too small, or taxed the wrong things.The $245 million tax package was approved 26-20, just two votes more than the 24 required for passage.It would expand the state's 5 percent sales tax to cover a variety of products and services not now taxed -- everything from snack foods to dry cleaning to massage parlors to pay-per-view TV. It also would raise taxes on cigarettes by a dime a pack and increase by 50 percent the current taxes on wine, beer and liquor.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
Carroll Commissioner Richard T. Yates criticized the county's General Assembly delegation yesterday for rejecting a referendum on a proposed tax that would have helped pay for farmland preservation. The controversial measills the delegation rejected.The tax would have raised about $2.5 million a year for farmland preservation and infrastructure improvements."I'm upset about it," Mr. Yates said. "They're telling the people of this county that they shouldn't vote on a proposal that is of much interest.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
Where does letter writer David Liddle get off saying Baltimore's proposed tax on shopping bags would not have hurt anyone ( "All can afford a 10-cent bag," Jan. 27 When you go to the grocery store, there are usually 10 grocery bags at least. No one has the right to tell another person they can afford anything. Everyone's circumstances are different. If the "bag tax" were affordable, why are there so many people out of work and living on the streets, robbing and killing to get money any way they can?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown marked Veterans Day on Monday by releasing a five-part plan for former members of the armed forces, including a tax break and help with employment and housing. Brown, the lieutenant governor and a colonel in the Army Reserve, issued what he called his "Compact with Maryland Veterans" Monday with little fanfare on a day when he avoided scheduling campaign appearances and instead attended ceremonial functions in his official capacity.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur is proposing an income tax cut for about 90 percent of the state's taxpayers — to be financed by imposing a higher rate on wealthy Marylanders. At a news conference Wednesday in Annapolis, Mizeur also rolled out an economic plan that calls for a minimum "living wage" that would reach $16.70 by 2022. Mizeur, a two-term delegate from Montgomery County, released the most comprehensive income tax plan announced so far by any of the Democratic or Republican gubernatorial candidates.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Area billboard companies are speaking out against a proposed tax introduced this week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. In a hearing before the City Council's taxation committee Thursday, the global billboard firm Clear Channel Outdoor offered to give the city more than $1 million in free advertising if the administration would drop plans for a tax on billboards. If not, the company's local general manager said, the city could face a lawsuit. "Will this legislation stand up to a legal challenge [that could]
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is expected to introduce legislation Monday that would give the city authority to levy two new taxes. One bill would authorize a tax of about 25 cents per taxi trip. Another would impose a tax on billboard advertisements within the city limits - $15 per square foot for billboards that electronically change images, and $5 per square foot for those that don't. A third measure would keep the tax on parking at its current rate of 20 percent, instead of decreasing it to 19 percent, as had been planned.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is at it again, and his proposed plan to raise the gasoline tax in Maryland must be defeated ("Gas tax: Pay now or later" Mar. 13). The brunt of Mr. O'Malley's new $3.4 billion gas tax proposal to increase funding for Maryland's transportation needs will fall squarely on Maryland's motorists and gasoline retailers. Under Mr. O'Malley's proposed gas tax hike, Maryland's gas tax rate would skyrocket to 39.5 cents per gallon, and it would become the 5th highest gas tax burden in the nation if gas averaged $3.50 a gallon per year.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
At an annual hearing that has become mere formality, taxpayers will have an opportunity tonight to tell the County Council their thoughts on a proposal to raise property taxes above the constant-yield rate.The constant-yield rate would produce the same amount of revenue from property taxes next fiscal year as this year, figuring in increased assessments. The county is required by state law to hold the hearing if its proposed tax rate is higher than the constant-yield rate.If last year was any indication -- only three people testified -- the hearing will draw scant interest.
NEWS
By William A. Au | May 10, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley in part proposes to solve Baltimore's financial crisis with an 8 percent energy tax on all nonprofits, saying it's time they bear their fair share of the city's burden in exchange for city services. All of the attention on this issue has focused on the large universities and hospitals. But the majority of the nonprofits that render vital services and provide social stability to our city are much smaller and operate on very tight budgets. This includes most neighborhood churches, synagogues and mosques.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Democratic leaders of the General Assembly are proposing to raise taxes on gasoline by $2 billion over five years to pay for highways, transit and other transportation projects. The legislation endorsed by the governor, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch is a complex plan that would add 2 cents to the cost of a gallon of gas July 1 and another 7 cents a year later. In 2015, it would rise by another 7 cents unless Congress passes a bill to allow states to impose the sales tax on Internet purchases.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
A carefully choreographed strategy to raise state income taxes to stave off so-called doomsday budget cuts faces a challenge in the General Assembly after several Democrats defied party leaders with a proposal to raise the sales tax instead. The brewing discontent within the Montgomery County House delegation stems from a belief that the governor's plan relies too heavily on their wealthy constituents. And though it faces little chance of passage, the proposal reveals a geographic fissure within the ruling Democratic caucus while underscoring the difficulty of forging consensus on a tax increase.
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