Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProposed Road
IN THE NEWS

Proposed Road

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1999
A hearing officer has denied a proposal to build a neighborhood of luxury houses in northern Baltimore County, handing a victory to a group of residents trying to prevent the project by blockading the developer's landlocked lot.In an order released yesterday, county hearing officer Lawrence E. Schmidt ruled that the developer of the proposed Ivy Manor development has failed to find a satisfactory way to connect the proposed neighborhood to a public road.Schmidt's...
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
August 9, 2011
On Thursday, Aug 4. my wife and I joined about 200 other people for a hearing in the county's George Howard Building. The subject was a study and proposed land acquisition for a road spur from the west side of Route 108 in Clarksville to Auto Drive in Clarksville. The proposal is a very poor solution to a problem that may or may not exist. The impact of the proposal on businesses and property owners affected is intolerable. It is difficult to see how or why the Howard County planning people would waste their time and county funds on an unnecessary study to reach an unsatisfactory conclusion.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
Reversing a stand it took earlier this summer, the Glen Burnie Improvement Association voted Tuesday not only to support a controversial $3.1 million bypass proposed for Old Stage Road, but also to ask the county to accelerate the project.Opponents of the road, however, vowed to continue their fight by packing future civic association meetings and attempting to get the latest vote overturned."It can't end here," said Denis Taylor, who has lived on nearby Thelma Avenue for a dozen years. "I can be here next month with five more people to bring this up again for a vote."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
Federal and state officials have scheduled a hearing on Charles County's proposal for a new highway that would require the destruction of 7 acres of wetlands around Mattawoman Creek. The Army Corps of Engineers and Maryland Department of the Environment have scheduled the hearing for 7 p.m. July 31 in the auditorium of the Charles County Government Building, 200 Baltimore St. in La Plata. The agencies will consider whether to allow Charles County to destroy wetlands to build a $60 million roadway called the Cross County Connector, a major east-west road that would replace 74 acres of forest with a strip of blacktop linking proposed subdivisions to the malls in Waldorf.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | April 23, 1991
The state and the county appear to be moving in opposite directions on building East-West Boulevard.County officials have decided to pay a developer $125,000 for an empty 1-acre lot in the middle of theproposed East-West Boulevard corridor, saying it would save them money "if and when" the road is built. But yesterday, a State Highway Administration official said that "because of the high degree of uncertainty surrounding this project," a study of the proposed road will bestalled another six months and won't be ready until late summer or early fall of next year.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Calling it a conflict of interest, members of the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission said yesterday that fellow member Grant S. Dannelly should not have supported a proposed road that would cross a piece of property he owns.But some members were quick to defend him, saying they accepted his explanation that he forgot to tell the commission about the potential conflict. Dannelly is under investigation by the county attorney for a possible ethics violation."He should have recused himself," said Thomas Hiltz, a commission member.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Elkridge residents who live near Montgomery Road and Interstate 95 say three proposed road projects near their neighborhoods are ill-timed and would bring more traffic to the area.Instead, about 20 residents told the Howard County Planning Board Thursday night, they want Route 100 completed before approval of new capital projects requested by the county Department of Public Works."We should do [Route] 100 first," said Barbara Wachs, executive board member of the Elkridge Community Association.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 1, 1999
Baltimore City and Carroll County are at odds over a plan to ease traffic congestion in fast-growing South Carroll by building a road that would cut close to a city-owned reservoir.The proposed $884,000 extension of Marriottsville Road, which would cross two streams that feed Liberty Reservoir, has been in the county's growth plan for its most populated area for almost 22 years. In that time, the population has doubled to 28,000, and traffic along the main arteries has increased so much that several intersections have received failing grades from the state.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
The Federal Bureau of Investigation and Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission are investigating the county's relocation of a proposed road last year -- and whether the change was intended to help developers planning an Annapolis-area retail and housing complex.The FBI is interviewing people associated with the rerouting of Medical Boulevard, which county officials last year said should lead directly to the entrance of the proposed Annapolis Marketplace west of Annapolis, according to sources close to the investigation.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
The Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission has found no violation of county ethics laws by a former top administrative official when he helped realign a proposed road in a way that could have aided a developer's quest for a major zoning change.In a ruling made public yesterday, the commission said that county officials "deviated from the usual county procedures" in attempting to move the road without public input or oversight, but found no wrongdoing on the part of Thomas C. Andrews -- then administrative officer, and now the county's land-use and environment officer.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
A Westminster man wants the Carroll County Circuit Court to prevent the commissioners from tying up his 100-acre property again with renewed talk of a Westminster bypass, a battle he won less than four years ago. James Edward Harris Sr. of the 1100 block of Brehm Road filed suit against the three commissioners after a recommendation last week by a blue-ribbon panel that the bypass be revived. Citing increasing traffic, the panel asked county officials to push the state again for an 8-mile bypass north of Route 140, recommending essentially the same route as one planned about 15 years ago. In the lawsuit filed this week by JFJME Family LLC, Harris, as its managing member, said he plans to develop some of the property, where he has a landscape contracting business.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2005
Citing an expected surge in traffic in coming years, a blue-ribbon panel has recommended the revival of a proposed bypass around Westminster, a $500 million project scrapped seven years ago by Gov. Parris N. Glendening as part of his Smart Growth anti-sprawl campaign. The panel, appointed by the Carroll County Commission, unveiled the plan for an 8-mile road north of Route 140 yesterday in an eight-page report that includes a map and details of a four-lane divided highway that would run from Leidy Road to Hughes Shop Road in the county seat.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
State environmental officials are withholding approval of a new road critical to building hundreds of homes at Turf Valley Resort and Conference Center in Ellicott City until owners provide the agency with additional details, including development plans for the 800-acre parcel. Mangione Family Enterprises, which owns and operates Turf Valley, has applied for permission to construct the proposed "Resort Road" through wetlands in the western part of the property and across the Little Patuxent River, ultimately connecting to Marriottsville Road.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
Sykesville is on its way to having a landscaped gateway entrance from Route 32 into the town and the Warfield Center, its planned business complex. State Highway Administration officials announced this week that construction will begin in the summer on a $3.1 million intersection north of Cooper Drive, near Sykesville Middle School. "This will be the gateway to Route 32," said Robert L. Fisher, SHA district engineer. "It will support the Warfield redevelopment and the state police training center."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
LT. GOV. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend began the process of separating herself from Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week by saying she might revive a comatose highway project the governor tried to kill off. Townsend, who has been the most loyal of lieutenants through seven years of the Glendening administration, told the Washington Post she is keeping an open mind about the Intercounty Connector - a long-proposed highway linking Interstate 270 in Montgomery County...
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
Traffic safety and truck noise topped the concerns of a group of residents who live opposite the site of a proposed Carroll County road on the outskirts of Union Bridge that is intended to get heavy cement trucks off the town's Main Street. Because of their concerns and because the projected number of trucks has doubled since 1999, Robert L. Fisher, the State Highway Administration engineer for District 7 in Frederick, said yesterday the state would require a traffic analysis before allowing the new Shepherd's Mill Road to connect to Route 75. The road would be built to intersect Ladiesburg Road bridge where it crosses Little Pipe Creek and connects with Route 75. It would run 6,500 feet from Quaker Hill Road - where Lehigh Portland Cement Co. is installing a kiln to double its output - and connect to Green Valley Road (Route 75)
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
The Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission has found no violation of county ethics laws by a former top administrative official when he helped realign a proposed road in a way that could have aided a developer's quest for a major zoning change.In a ruling made public yesterday, the commission said that county officials "deviated from the usual county procedures" in attempting to move the road without public input or oversight, but found no wrongdoing on the part of Thomas C. Andrews -- then administrative officer, and now the county's land-use officer.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and SUN STAFF | January 1, 1999
Baltimore City and Carroll County are at odds over a plan to ease traffic congestion in fast-growing South Carroll by building a road that would cut close to a city-owned reservoir.The proposed $884,000 extension of Marriottsville Road, which would cross two streams that feed Liberty Reservoir, has been in the county's growth plan for its most populated area for almost 22 years. In that time, the population has doubled to 28,000, and traffic along the main arteries has increased so much that several intersections have received failing grades from the state.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
Hoping to breathe new life into a long-discussed proposal, some politicians have asked the county executive to put a multimillion-dollar connection between Route 100 and Fort Smallwood Road on the county's priority list of transportation projects. Pasadena's District 31 legislative delegation - state Sen. Philip C. Jimeno and Dels. Joan Cadden, Mary Rosso and John R. Leopold, the lone Republican - said such an action by County Executive Janet S. Owens would allow the State Highway Administration to conduct a feasibility study on the project.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
The Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission has found no violation of county ethics laws by a former top administrative official when he helped realign a proposed road in a way that could have aided a developer's quest for a major zoning change.In a ruling made public yesterday, the commission said that county officials "deviated from the usual county procedures" in attempting to move the road without public input or oversight, but found no wrongdoing on the part of Thomas C. Andrews -- then administrative officer, and now the county's land-use and environment officer.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.