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Proposed Ordinance

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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
Baltimore restaurants and city food vendors cited for health code violations soon might have their names published and broadcast under a proposed ordinance unveiled yesterday by the city Health Department.In the past, city laws prevented the Health Department from releasing the names of violators to the news media, saying that city fines and temporary shutdowns were punishment enough.But high-profile violations last year at a large grocer and one of the city's top-rated downtown restaurants caused city leaders to reconsider the policy.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Two Anne Arundel county councilmen have introduced dueling but similar legislation that would clear the way for the ouster of their colleague, Daryl D. Jones, who is set to begin a five-month prison term next month. John J. Grasso, a Republican from Glen Burnie, introduced a resolution at Monday night's council meeting that would, if passed, declare Jones' seat vacant and allow the council to proceed in appointing a replacement. The bill mirrors an emergency ordinance introduced by Jamie Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1999
A proposed Westminster zoning amendment could encourage owners of decrepit apartment buildings to raze and rebuild by allowing them 20 percent more units if they do.At a public hearing last night held by the Westminster Common Council, the proposal was supported by city staff and in a letter from a housing advocacy group.Thomas B. Beyard, the city director of planning and public works, said the proposed ordinance "grew out of discussions a year or so ago about the comprehensive plan, neighborhood revitalization -- and some roadblocks in our zoning ordinances that would not allow certain structures to be replaced."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
CHICAGO -- Chicago may become the first city in the nation to require big-box retailers such as Wal-Mart or Home Depot to pay employees a "living wage" of at least $10 an hour, plus $3 an hour in benefits. So far, 33 of 50 City Council members have signed on to the proposed ordinance - more than enough to pass it, perhaps as soon as next month. The bill would affect only stores that have at least 75,000 square feet and are operated by companies with at least $1 billion in annual sales, allowing smaller retailers to continue with the state minimum wage of $6.50 an hour.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
TOMORROW The Annapolis city council -- will hold a work session at 6 p.m. to discuss Market Place and a proposed ordinance relating to city boundaries. The public may attend, observe, and listen to the discussion, but may not ask questions because this is a work session for council members.At its regular session at 7:30 p.m., the council will take up a proposed ordinance that would change the zoning for a special district along West Street. Both sessions will be held in city council chambers, second floor, City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St.
NEWS
September 8, 2000
Mount Airy Town Council will hold a public hearing at 7:45 p.m. Monday at Town Hall to discuss a proposed ordinance that would allow clubs and fraternal organizations as a permitted use in the industrial zone. The regular monthly meeting will follow at 8 p.m. The agenda includes discussion of the proposed ordinance, the Flickinger annexation request and homestead tax. The Town Council also will hold a public hearing at 8 p.m. Sept. 18 on an ordinance pertaining to revision of the sign regulations.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
MOUNT AIRY - A divided Planning Commission approved a proposed ordinance that would require builders to preserve at least 30 percent of existing trees undisturbed in new residential developments.The tree-preservation measure, which would apply to parcels of 500,000 square feet or larger, passed by a 3-2 vote.At an industrial or commercial development, 15 percent of the existing trees must be undisturbed, according to the measure.The proposed ordinance now goes on to the Town Council, which must conduct a public hearing and will make the final decision, possibly in January.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
The Union Bridge Town Council is considering an ordinance that would make obstructing traffic and blocking sidewalks misdemeanors subject to a $25 fine.State Police Tfc. Leonard Mays, a resident trooper who provides town police protection, said some teen-agers and young adults have been sitting in the streets, leaving doors of parked cars open or hanging out on the sidewalks, blocking pedestrians.Councilwoman Kathleen D. Kreimer introduced the proposed ordinance.Mays said no one has been injured and that the problem is "more of a nuisance" than an "injury situation."
NEWS
January 29, 1998
The Carroll County Commissioners will hold a public hearing at 4 p.m. Tuesday on the proposed amendment of Development Impact Fee Ordinance No. 74.The county staff will answer questions and receive comments on the ordinance at 9 a.m. tomorrow.The proposed ordinance would amend Section 7 of Ordinance 74 by requiring the impact fee be paid when a building permit is issued. It also allows the payment to be credited against future impact fee assessments on the property should the initial building permit expire.
NEWS
October 30, 1992
Workers turn out for personnel hearingAbout 30 Carroll County employees attented a public hearing Tuesday on the county's proposed personnel ordinance.The ordinance would revise and update Carroll's existing personnel ordinance and incorpiorate its employee handbook into one document, said county Attorney Charles W. "Chuck" Thompson Jr. He said there was some concern about layoffs because of some rewording in the proposed ordinance. But he told workers that there are "no expectations of layoffs at this point in time."
NEWS
October 9, 2005
TOMORROW The Annapolis city council -- will hold a work session at 6 p.m. to discuss Market Place and a proposed ordinance relating to city boundaries. The public may attend, observe, and listen to the discussion, but may not ask questions because this is a work session for council members.At its regular session at 7:30 p.m., the council will take up a proposed ordinance that would change the zoning for a special district along West Street. Both sessions will be held in city council chambers, second floor, City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Carroll County zoning and environmental officials will seek public comment at five workshops around the county to discuss their plans to set limits on recreational all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes. The 7 p.m. meetings have been scheduled for Sept. 29 in Room 003 of the County Office Building; Oct. 4 at the North Carroll Senior Center; Oct. 18 at the Mount Airy Senior Center; Oct. 20 at Oklahoma Road Middle School and Oct. 27 at Runnymede Elementary School. County zoning administrator Neil M. Ridgely said that after gathering citizens' comments, a proposed ordinance would be drafted and subject to a public hearing before passage.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
Carroll County officials plan to go on the road with their draft of a noise ordinance that arose primarily from homeowners' complaints about the drone of four-wheel ATVs, dirt bikes and other similar vehicles. The draft ordinance would set quantitative limits such as decibel readings and time frames. It would also assess the quality of noise: Whether it is constant, as opposed to a gunshot or sound made by a pile driver, and whether it constitutes pollution that interferes with the enjoyment of homes or businesses.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
Westminster city officials introduced an ordinance last night that is designed to foster a cooperative solution to residential housing problems. The "Disorderly House Nuisance" proposal deals exclusively with residences where two or more criminal offenses, property maintenance and zoning violations occur within a year. Other violations that would cause a house to be declared disorderly run the gamut from alcohol and noise complaints to animal control and safety issues. Under the proposal, the property's owner - or the offending occupant - would be required to meet with city officials and create a binding agreement specifically tailored to make the residence comply with the city's code.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
Union Bridge officials quietly and unanimously killed a proposed ordinance that they had hoped would reduce nuisance calls to police for the same address - three months after an overflow crowd voiced its displeasure with the measure. Speaker after speaker at a March 22 public hearing praised the mayor and Town Council for attempting to solve the problem of repeated calls about music, drinking and arguing, but almost unanimously criticized the approach as open to abuse. Although the problem is a common one, the town's approach was unusual, town and state officials said at the time.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
The Union Bridge Town Council has a vacancy to fill because one of its members has moved out of town and no longer can serve. Dawn M. Metcalf sat among the spectators Monday night, rather than at the council seat she has held for 7 1/2 years, to receive thanks - and a red rosebush - from her colleagues. She said later that she and her husband have recently relocated their home and business, OSF Seamless Gutters, to the Taneytown area. Mayor Bret D. Grossnickle said he and the council probably would conduct interviews and choose a successor within a few months.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1996
Carroll developers, real estate agents and building contractors overwhelmingly objected yesterday to a controversial measure to control growth, arguing that the proposal would hurt their businesses, mean layoffs and stifle the local economy.Greg Dorsey, president of the county chapter of the Home Builders Association, said the proposed ordinance, developed by a nationally known planning consultant, does not provide a solution to growth-related problems and ignores his industry's economic impact.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
Union Bridge officials said yesterday that they will probably scrap a proposal to start fining property owners for repeat nuisance calls that tie up their police service, but are hoping to come up with another solution. Mayor Bret D. Grossnickle said the council will likely start looking for other options in dealing with repeated police calls to the same addresses for loud music, drinking, arguing and fighting. Grossnickle's comments came the day after residents overflowed Monday night's public hearing in nearly unanimous opposition to a proposed ordinance that they characterized as overly punitive, possibly illegal and a deterrent to calling police for help.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 28, 2004
A Union Bridge committee will look into the problem of repeated nuisance calls to the police after a proposed ordinance that would have fined property owners met with near-unanimous opposition. Rather than voting on the ordinance, the Town Council approved Mayor Bret D. Grossnickle's naming of a six-member committee of council members, landlords and residents at its meeting Monday night. The committee has been asked to review the proposal and the problem that led to it: repeated calls to the same addresses for complaints such as loud music, drinking, arguing and fighting, Grossnickle said.
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