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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
When Whitney Watts of Columbia agreed to bear twins on behalf of an infertile Boston couple two years ago, she entered a murky area of Maryland law. Nothing forbade her from signing a contract to carry babies conceived through in vitro fertilization and implanted in her uterus. But neither were there guarantees that Maryland courts would enforce the contract if something went wrong. To this day, such questions are left up to individual judges. Watts' experience had a happy ending, despite serious complications that arose midway through her pregnancy.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ocean City officials voted earlier this week to draft a law to restrict smoking on the beach and boardwalk beginning May 1, 2015. The proposed ordinance, which passed on a 4-3 vote at a work session for the town council on Tuesday, identifies a number of designated areas for smoking along the boardwalk and on the beach. Police will be responsible for enforcement of the law through verbal as well as written citations ranging from $25 to $1,000, a "worse-case scenario" for non-compliance.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
When a truck driver's improperly loaded rig slammed into a footbridge over the Baltimore Beltway two years ago, causing it to collapse and kill a motorist, state law provided no option for criminal charges. Now state transportation officials are pushing for a law that would hold truck drivers and their companies legally responsible if their loads recklessly endanger others. A bill proposed by the Department of Transportation would establish substantial penalties and fines for commercial truckers who are involved in accidents that cause serious injury or death, if the drivers or owners are found to have committed serious safety violations.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Maryland lawmakers are poised to outlaw the shackling of pregnant inmates. The proposed law would make it illegal to shackle incarcerated women while they are in labor, delivery and recovering from giving birth. While legislative analysts said most jails and prisons in Maryland already advise against using waist restraints and unnecessary confinement for pregnant women, the bill makes clear that it is illegal and spells out the narrow circumstances under which pregnant women can be shackled.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
In the 19 months since the burglar alarm in Jeffrey Klein's Randallstown home kept neighbors awake for six days -- as he vacationed in Asia -- things have returned to normal on his quiet street of townhouses."
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Frank Remesch, general manager of 1st Mariner Arena , suggests that Bruce Springsteen may skip Baltimore because of limits on convenience fees ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). Mr. Springsteen has played Baltimore twice in 40 years. Since his last show here in 2009, he has played over 150 concerts, half a dozen of which were in Philadelphia or D.C. It's pretty obvious that limits on fees are not the reason Mr. Springsteen skips Baltimore. Let's be honest.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
I am a gun owner, and like some others I have grave concerns about the use of guns in the commission of a crime. However, the actions taken by our legislature only penalize the law abiding citizen. Legislators had the chance to accept an amendment to the proposed law that would have increased penalties for gun crime offenders. The law abiding citizen is not the problem. The problem is our legislature's failure, as well as that of the judicial branch, penalize the criminal. Use a gun to commit a crime, and chances are the courts will only slap the hands of the criminal and eventually let them back on the street commit another crime.
NEWS
December 22, 2000
EXPANDING THE STOCK of affordable housing is a goal the county commissioners embraced when they took office two years ago. Now they appear ready to do something about it, with a law that would allow the rental of so-called "in-law" apartments and farm tenant houses. As it applies to existing units -- 120 in-law apartments and 42 tenant houses -- that's not a bad idea. There's no reason to restrict the options of property owners when these dwellings can serve a useful purpose. Currently, only family members (or workers on an owner's farm)
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A Senate committee has unanimously approved an administration bill that would broaden the state laws on domestic violence, but only after making key changes.In the bill approved yesterday, Sen. Walter M. Baker, the committee chairman, made two major adjustments: halving the length of civil protection orders from a year to six months and defining "cohabitants" as people who had lived together at least 90 days.Judges use civil protection orders to separate parties in a domestic dispute.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
CARROLL COUNTY'S efforts to limit the location of sexually oriented businesses is both belated and foresighted. Belated because many counties have already dealt with the problem, enacting laws and defending them in appeals courts. All of which is a benefit to Carroll in its first crack at the issue. Foresighted because the influx of topless bars and adult bookstores that often follows expanding population has thankfully not yet hit here in full force. The ordinance proposals may not, however, promptly resolve the immediate controversy, a new Eldersburg video store that has an "adults only" section separated from its main retail area.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
I am glad the legislature is considering a law for outpatient mental health commitment. ( "Legislation pushes involuntary mental health treatment," March 10). It is understandable that there is opposition by some, including health organizations. But this will help to air both sides of the issue in the legislative committee hearings. While some people regard this kind of law with alarm, it is important to note that 37 states and the District of Columbia currently have such laws.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Frank Remesch, general manager of 1st Mariner Arena , suggests that Bruce Springsteen may skip Baltimore because of limits on convenience fees ("Ticketmaster fees could be unlimited with proposed law," July 3). Mr. Springsteen has played Baltimore twice in 40 years. Since his last show here in 2009, he has played over 150 concerts, half a dozen of which were in Philadelphia or D.C. It's pretty obvious that limits on fees are not the reason Mr. Springsteen skips Baltimore. Let's be honest.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
The Sun's argument that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake should veto Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's local hiring bill is quite weak on a number of fronts ("Noble but flawed," May 15). First, The Sun argues that if challenged, the proposed law will likely fail constitutional muster. However, like San Francisco and Boston, the law may never be challenged, and if it is, we have a judicial branch to decide its constitutionality. As many are aware, the law in any field is almost never settled and can always change.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
I am a gun owner, and like some others I have grave concerns about the use of guns in the commission of a crime. However, the actions taken by our legislature only penalize the law abiding citizen. Legislators had the chance to accept an amendment to the proposed law that would have increased penalties for gun crime offenders. The law abiding citizen is not the problem. The problem is our legislature's failure, as well as that of the judicial branch, penalize the criminal. Use a gun to commit a crime, and chances are the courts will only slap the hands of the criminal and eventually let them back on the street commit another crime.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
When Whitney Watts of Columbia agreed to bear twins on behalf of an infertile Boston couple two years ago, she entered a murky area of Maryland law. Nothing forbade her from signing a contract to carry babies conceived through in vitro fertilization and implanted in her uterus. But neither were there guarantees that Maryland courts would enforce the contract if something went wrong. To this day, such questions are left up to individual judges. Watts' experience had a happy ending, despite serious complications that arose midway through her pregnancy.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
It seems as if it would be a common-sense maxim for cyclists: Wear a helmet. Maryland law mandates the practice for children 16 and younger, similar to standards in nearly two dozen states. Under a Sykesville town ordinance, a person of any age can have their bike impounded for being caught without one three times. A bill in the General Assembly would make Maryland the first state in the country to extend helmet requirements to any person on any bike. More helmets, more safety?
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
When developer Robert DeStefano of the Sturbridge Development Co. sought a rezoning of 70 acres near Crofton to build a combination shopping center and community center, some residents were skeptical.They asked what would happen if Mr. DeStefano changed his mind about paying for the community center once the rezoning had been approved.And what would happen if the land was sold and the new owner didn't feel bound by Mr. DeStefano's promise to help the community.To reassure residents, Mr. DeStefano proposed changing the county zoning law to create a zoning category called a "community service center growth management district."
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Anne Arundel County Council members could vote on issues affecting their profession and distant relatives, and more county employees could accept gifts, under sweeping law changes to be considered tomorrow, Ethics Commission members say. County Executive Janet S. Owens recommended the changes last month to make the county's ethics law more like state law. But members of the county ethics panel, who learned the specifics of the overhaul only recently, said...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Outspoken Del. Patrick L. McDonough outlined his plans for tough penalties for gun crimes as firearms owners gathered at a Bel Air shooting range as part of a national series of events to push back against proposed gun control measures. "What I'm mad as hell about is they want to take our Second Amendment rights away, but they don't care about people who are really committing the crimes," McDonough said of people proposing new gun laws. He was speaking at the Horst & McCann indoor gun range in Bel Air as part of a series of events dubbed "Gun Appreciation Day," by a Republican political consultant, and staged as a protest against new gun laws that President Barack Obama and governors including Martin O'Malley have proposed in the wake of the mass shooting at a Connecticut elementary school.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
The recent column by two law school professors urging President Barack Obama to "bypass Congress" by making law through executive orders is truly alarming ("Bypass Congress," Dec. 27). The Revolutionary War was fought for our freedom from the King of England who made arbitrary laws with no accountability, no restraints, no constitution. The system of checks and balances with three independent branches of government was designed to protect us from a president who would envision himself as a king who can do no wrong, who can by the "stroke of a pen" as the law professors say, make law according to his own personal whims.
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