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Proposed Constitutional Amendment

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NEWS
March 25, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly reported that a proposed constitutional amendment to change the Maryland Judicial Disabilities Commission would have to be signed by the governor before it could appear on a statewide ballot. Amendments to the state constitution must be approved by a three-fifths majority of the House of Delegates and Senate, but do not require the governor's signature., The Sun regrets the errors.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 26, 2014
Honestly, unless you are a big government liberal, how many people think the federal government should have more power than it already exercises over its citizens? Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, 94, thinks the Constitution needs at least six amendments in order to bring the country more in line with what he believes is good for us. He outlines them in his new book, "Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution. " It is a revealing look into liberal thinking and the ideological opposite of radio talk show host Mark Levin's book, "The Liberty Amendments: Restoring theAmerican Republic.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | March 31, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When Maryland voters go to the polls this fall, they may be asked to change the state Constitution to permit civil cases to be heard by six-member juries instead of the traditional 12-member ones.The Senate voted unanimously last night in favor of two House bills on the issue, one to send the proposed constitutional amendment to voters in a November referendum and the other to put the change into effect if the voters approve it.The measures would first have to be signed into law by the governor.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
After weeks of intense lobbying and endless speculation about who might vote how, a joint session of the Massachusetts legislature made blessedly quick work last week of a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. In a State House mobbed with revved-up campaigners on both sides of the issue, lawmakers took a quarter-hour to dispatch the proposal by a decisive margin. The vote was a victory for decency and civil equality, and underscored Massachusetts' long history of protecting individual rights.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Del. John S. Arnick, speaking from painful personal experience, urged a House committee yesterday to change Maryland's Constitution so that future judicial appointees are not permitted to take the bench until after they have been confirmed by the state Senate.Last year, after Mr. Arnick was appointed to the Baltimore County District Court, he resigned his seat in the legislature, gave up his law practice, put on the judicial robes and began hearing cases.Then, amid allegations that he had made vulgar and sexist comments about women during a dinner meeting with two female lobbyists a year earlier, the Dundalk Democrat watched his Senate confirmation unexpectedly go up in flames.
NEWS
December 12, 1995
AN ASTERISK on the Bill of Rights? That could happen, if the Senate votes today to send to the states a proposed constitutional amendment allowing states and the Congress to prohibit the desecration of the American flag. Since most state legislatures are already on record in support of such a move, there is a real chance that, after more than two centuries, Americans would vote to place the first restriction on the freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.The proposed amendment passed the House in June by a wide margin, and now is within a few votes of attracting the two-thirds majority it needs in the Senate.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Having opposed every other proposed constitutional amendment during his term, President Clinton now intends to support one guaranteeing crime victims the right to be notified of and heard at court proceedings involving defendants in their cases, administration officials say.Although civil libertarians and some experts in the Justice Department oppose such an amendment as a dangerous cluttering of the Constitution, and though about 20 states...
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the third time in the past seven years, Congress will try again to make it an offense against the Constitution to deface the American flag.Tomorrow, the House will take up a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw "physical desecration" of the nation's most conspicuous symbol. While the proposal is likely to sail through the House, it appears to be a few votes short of the two-thirds majority it would need for adoption by the Senate.Even if it stumbles in the Senate, the amendment will stir anew what has become a fiery biennial debate between some flag-waving patriots and civil libertarians.
NEWS
By Adrian Cronauer | November 2, 1997
Thirty years ago, as a young Air Force disc jockey, I entertained U.S. troops in Vietnam. My signature wake-up call, "Good morning, Vietnam!" became the title of the hit movie based ever so loosely on my radio career in Saigon.The film had plenty of Hollywood exaggeration. For example, I must admit that Robin Williams, who played me in the film, is much funnier than I am. I also believe that I was a better disc jockey.But important element of truth to the film showed how frequently I annoyed the Saigon brass by fighting against military censorship.
NEWS
May 14, 1992
This month, five states ratified a 202-year-old proposed constitutional amendment forbidding members of Congress from raising their salaries during a session of Congress. This brought the total number of states ratifying the proposal to 39, which is the requisite 75 percent of the states the Constitution requires for adding an amendment. Yesterday, the archivist of the United States, Don Wilson, said that as soon as he has all the ratification documents in hand, he will certify the adoption of the 27th Amendment.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | February 10, 2007
The state Senate began debate yesterday on a constitutional amendment that would let voters decide whether they want a limited number of polls to open several days before an election. Early voting has turned into a multiyear legislative effort among Democrats in the face of creative and persistent Republican opposition. Republicans have long argued that early voting is a political maneuver to make it easier for voters in heavily Democratic areas to reach the polls. Sen. Roy P. Dyson, a Southern Maryland Democrat, said it's about convenience for everyone.
NEWS
By Adrian Cronauer | November 2, 1997
Thirty years ago, as a young Air Force disc jockey, I entertained U.S. troops in Vietnam. My signature wake-up call, "Good morning, Vietnam!" became the title of the hit movie based ever so loosely on my radio career in Saigon.The film had plenty of Hollywood exaggeration. For example, I must admit that Robin Williams, who played me in the film, is much funnier than I am. I also believe that I was a better disc jockey.But important element of truth to the film showed how frequently I annoyed the Saigon brass by fighting against military censorship.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the third time in the past seven years, Congress will try again to make it an offense against the Constitution to deface the American flag.Tomorrow, the House will take up a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw "physical desecration" of the nation's most conspicuous symbol. While the proposal is likely to sail through the House, it appears to be a few votes short of the two-thirds majority it would need for adoption by the Senate.Even if it stumbles in the Senate, the amendment will stir anew what has become a fiery biennial debate between some flag-waving patriots and civil libertarians.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The infantile spectacle that the State of the Union address has become should carry a surgeon general's warning: ''This is harmful to the reputations of the president and the congressional audience, and can cause a spike of cynicism in the watching minority -- thank goodness it is that -- of the citizenry.''In the name of a report on the country's condition, a president notoriously unparsimonious with words delivers a laundry list of everything he can think of that government might do to nudge that condition toward perfection.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton indicated yesterday that he would not fight an amendment to the Constitution to require balanced budget, a signal that he recognizes he cannot block the measure given the Senate's stronger Republican majority.Clinton, who worked to defeat the popular measure by one Senate vote in 1995, said that when the proposal comes up again he may seek instead to insert an escape clause to provide for the need to fight recessions with deficit spending."I just want to make sure that if we have [a balanced budget amendment]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Having opposed every other proposed constitutional amendment during his term, President Clinton now intends to support one guaranteeing crime victims the right to be notified of and heard at court proceedings involving defendants in their cases, administration officials say.Although civil libertarians and some experts in the Justice Department oppose such an amendment as a dangerous cluttering of the Constitution, and though about 20 states...
NEWS
June 18, 2007
After weeks of intense lobbying and endless speculation about who might vote how, a joint session of the Massachusetts legislature made blessedly quick work last week of a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. In a State House mobbed with revved-up campaigners on both sides of the issue, lawmakers took a quarter-hour to dispatch the proposal by a decisive margin. The vote was a victory for decency and civil equality, and underscored Massachusetts' long history of protecting individual rights.
NEWS
By PATRICK ERCOLANO | November 27, 1993
Six weeks before the start of the 1994 General Assembly session in Annapolis, one bill with a ''can't miss'' label is a proposed constitutional amendment promising certain rights during court proceedings to victims of violent crimes.But before legislators OK the amendment for public judgment on next November's ballot, they need to examine its flaws. Not the least of these is the threat to the crucial premise that every defendant is presumed innocent until proved guilty in a speedy and impartial trial.
NEWS
December 12, 1995
AN ASTERISK on the Bill of Rights? That could happen, if the Senate votes today to send to the states a proposed constitutional amendment allowing states and the Congress to prohibit the desecration of the American flag. Since most state legislatures are already on record in support of such a move, there is a real chance that, after more than two centuries, Americans would vote to place the first restriction on the freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.The proposed amendment passed the House in June by a wide margin, and now is within a few votes of attracting the two-thirds majority it needs in the Senate.
NEWS
March 25, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly reported that a proposed constitutional amendment to change the Maryland Judicial Disabilities Commission would have to be signed by the governor before it could appear on a statewide ballot. Amendments to the state constitution must be approved by a three-fifths majority of the House of Delegates and Senate, but do not require the governor's signature., The Sun regrets the errors.
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