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By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
Responding to soaring real estate assessments, an Annapolis alderman has proposed a city charter amendment that would require a "super-majority" of six of the city council's nine members to allow property tax revenue to increase by 5 percent or more a year. Alderman Joshua J. Cohen, an Eastport Democrat, introduced the measure this month as a way to help residents "get some predictability" with their taxes and provide them "with a reasonable safeguard" as property values continue to rise due to assessment increases.
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January 26, 2012
WESTMINSTER — The Board of County Commissioners this week opened its process for setting a budget for fiscal year 2013 with a review of the ups and downs of the local economy and their impact on the county. In a Jan. 24 presentation, Ted Zaleski, director of Management and Budget, said there are signs of an economic recovery, but it has been slow and not strong enough to have a significant positive impact on the budget. He told the commissioners that revenue projected for fiscal year 2012 is $2 million higher than originally budgeted, but property tax revenue, which is the largest contributor to the budget, is down 2 percent this year.
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NEWS
By Robert C. Schaeffer | November 4, 1990
At this late date, the voter needs to be aware of a few important things regarding the Property Tax Limit (Question D) on Tuesday's ballot.First, the ballot itself is misworded. The summary of the real amendment indicates that the council may raise the tax rate 4.5 percent above the constant yield rate. That is absolutely incorrect and does not represent the amendment itself, which says that the rate may permit revenues to increase no more than 4.5 percent above last year's revenues.The next important thing for voters to consider, especially those who are concerned by the constant bombardment of distortions and outright lies by those who want to continue higher taxes, is this: There will be NO CUT in the education budget.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Howard budget director Raymond S. Wacks does not foresee a budget-busting gap between revenue and spending this fiscal year, but he warned the County Council that falling assessments will mean flat property tax revenues for years to come. He also told council members Monday that after cost-cutting and some improvement in revenues, a feared $19.6 million shortfall last fiscal year was erased by the time the books were closed June 30. "We did not find $20 million," Wacks said. "Revenues weren't quite as bad as we thought they would be, and we were able to save more.
NEWS
March 1, 2006
ISSUE: An Annapolis alderman has proposed a city charter amendment that would require the votes of six of the city council's nine members to allow property tax revenue to increase by 5 percent or more a year. Alderman Josh Cohen, an Eastport Democrat, introduced the measure this month to help residents gain predictability with their taxes as property values continue to rise. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said she does not oppose Cohen's measure, but she expressed worry that requiring six votes to allow a property tax revenue increase of 5 percent or more might politicize the budget process and restrict the city's ability to meet demands for services.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has authorized an early disbursement of property tax revenue and other funds to the city of Annapolis, allowing the city to keep paying its bills. Despite passing a balanced budget this year, Annapolis has struggled to take in enough tax receipts and other revenue to meet expenses. The city obtained a $10 million credit line after Mayor Joshua J. Cohen warned the city was in danger of not being able to meet payroll and pay other debts.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
Officials in Anne Arundel, Prince George's and Montgomery counties are bracing for what they say will be certain economic disaster if voters pass property-tax caps that appear as charter amendments on tomorrow's ballots.The tax caps, they say, when combined with the effects of a lingering recession and impending cuts in state aid to local governments, will lead to deep cuts in services, particularly in education, fire and police protection, and libraries."The long-term impact over the next four to five years, I believe, would be devastating," said Prince George's County Executive Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1990
Former Baltimore County Executive Donald P. Hutchinson is heading a coalition of county labor, business and education groups opposed to the proposed 2 percent cap on property tax revenue increases on the Nov. 6 ballot.Called CARES (Citizens Against Reduction of Essential Services), Hutchinson's group is to work with a statewide organization that hopes to raise $500,000 to fight similar tax cap proposals in Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties.The larger group is led by the Maryland State Teachers Association, which has agreed to lend $250,000 to the effort.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- A new interpretation of a proposal intended to hold down rising property taxes in Anne Arundel County prompted county officials yesterday to question whether the plan would provide voters with any tax relief at all.The charter amendment, petitioned to the Nov. 6 ballot by the group Anne Arundel Taxpayers for Responsive Government, would limit annual increases in the property tax revenue to 4.5 percent per year or the rate of inflation, whichever...
NEWS
February 26, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- The Annapolis city council, concerned about rental property maintenance and landlords who neglect their units, is considering a bill that would force landlords to repair or replace defective major appliances such as refrigerators, stoves and furnaces. The bill also would clarify who is responsible for general maintenance - the landlord or the tenant. How serious a problem do you think Annapolis has with rental property maintenance? Do you think the city should be imposing stricter rules on property owners?
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold has authorized an early disbursement of property tax revenue and other funds to the city of Annapolis, allowing the city to keep paying its bills. Despite passing a balanced budget this year, Annapolis has struggled to take in enough tax receipts and other revenue to meet expenses. The city obtained a $10 million credit line after Mayor Joshua J. Cohen warned the city was in danger of not being able to meet payroll and pay other debts.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
Baltimore's rosy finances, which have allowed the city to spend millions of extra dollars on school construction and children's programs, appear to be slowing down, an indication that the softer real estate market is catching up with City Hall. The city is projecting a $7.8 million surplus for the current fiscal year, a significant drop from the $61 million surplus expected about the corresponding time last year. Property tax revenue is coming in slightly below estimates, and other real estate taxes, such as recordation and transfer taxes, are also expected to decline.
NEWS
March 1, 2006
ISSUE: An Annapolis alderman has proposed a city charter amendment that would require the votes of six of the city council's nine members to allow property tax revenue to increase by 5 percent or more a year. Alderman Josh Cohen, an Eastport Democrat, introduced the measure this month to help residents gain predictability with their taxes as property values continue to rise. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said she does not oppose Cohen's measure, but she expressed worry that requiring six votes to allow a property tax revenue increase of 5 percent or more might politicize the budget process and restrict the city's ability to meet demands for services.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- The Annapolis city council, concerned about rental property maintenance and landlords who neglect their units, is considering a bill that would force landlords to repair or replace defective major appliances such as refrigerators, stoves and furnaces. The bill also would clarify who is responsible for general maintenance - the landlord or the tenant. How serious a problem do you think Annapolis has with rental property maintenance? Do you think the city should be imposing stricter rules on property owners?
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
Responding to soaring real estate assessments, an Annapolis alderman has proposed a city charter amendment that would require a "super-majority" of six of the city council's nine members to allow property tax revenue to increase by 5 percent or more a year. Alderman Joshua J. Cohen, an Eastport Democrat, introduced the measure this month as a way to help residents "get some predictability" with their taxes and provide them "with a reasonable safeguard" as property values continue to rise due to assessment increases.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
THEY'RE NOT as eye-catching as the construction cranes around Baltimore's waterfront and downtown, or the scaffolding in front of rowhouses being rehabbed in neighborhoods like Reservoir Hill or Patterson Park. But revenue trends -- gleaned from the preliminary budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 and other documents -- suggest just as strongly the city's improving fortunes. Take property tax receipts, the city's largest single source of funds, accounting for about 30 percent of the city's $1.9 billion operating budget.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
Voter anger and disgust with politics and politicians carried the day in Anne Arundel County, as taxpayers approved limits on the amount of property tax the county can collect and the number of terms County Council members can serve.With all but two of the county's 117 precincts reporting, the tax cap measure was winning by a better than 2-1 margin. The term limitation was approved by an even greater margin."We didn't just squeak through here," said Robert C. Schaeffer, president of the Anne Arundel Taxpayers Association, who has spearheaded the tax cap through two elections.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Anne Arundel County's leading tax rebel has dropped his threat to challenge in court the county's limit on property assessment increases, a move that could have threatened property tax credits for more than a half-million homeowners statewide.Robert C. Schaeffer, president of the Anne Arundel Taxpayers Association, said yesterday the County Council met his demands when it dropped the property tax rate by 8 cents last week to $2.38 per $100 of assessed value.Mr. Schaeffer, author of an initiative that limits the increase in the county's property tax revenue to 4.5 percent each year or the rate of inflation, whichever is less, threatened the suit last December after the County Council adopted a 4 percent cap on annual assessment increases.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
Rising property and income tax revenue should provide Howard County with a surplus at the end of the fiscal year June 30 that is three times higher than last year's -- but still a relatively small financial cushion, county officials said yesterday. Raymond S. Wacks, the county's budget director, told the county's Spending Affordability Committee that he estimates property taxes will produce $3.7 million more than expected, followed by $1.3 million more from income taxes and $1 million from other levies -- mainly the real estate recordation tax. Investment income, meanwhile, might decline by $200,000, he said.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
While the highest assessments in more than a decade are arriving in the mail to one-third of Harford's property owners, the county isn't preparing for a major boost to its coffers. "It helps the county grow revenues to cover inflation," said budget director John J. O'Neill Jr. "It's not a big windfall for the county. It doesn't give us a big pot of money." The state Department of Assessments and Taxation, which reassesses one-third of the properties in each of the state's 24 jurisdictions each year, mailed out new assessments last week to more than 645,000 properties, 22,500 of which are in Harford, said Jerrald Simmers of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
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