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By BARRY RASCOVAR | June 5, 1994
They just don't get it. Those lesser-lights in the Baltimore City and Baltimore County councils still haven't figured out what the public wants from its elected leaders. The same holds true for most of this state's county executives and mayors.What the people want, these politicians maintain, is lower taxes. ''Cut the property tax rate!'' is still their battle cry.But is that really the most pressing thing on Marylanders' minds?No way.What's of paramount importance to citizens these days is public safety.
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NEWS
BY ERIKA BUTLER | June 3, 2014
With little fanfare, the Aberdeen City Council passed its $14.08 million budget for the next fiscal year that calls for spending less than in this fiscal year and does not include a property tax rate or water and sewer rate increase. As it passed the budget 4-0 (Councilman Bruce Garner was absent) for fiscal year 2015 during its city council meeting Monday night, the council members adjusted this year's budget to make repairs at the Aberdeen swim club and Ripken Stadium and one councilwoman thanked The Record for its recent editorial.
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NEWS
December 17, 2010
In Dan Rodricks' column "Recession changing Baltimore region's housing paradigm" (Dec. 16) he acknowledges that Baltimore urgently needs to cut its property tax rate to prevent further loss of population and investment, and he says that "somebody needs to figure this out, and fast. " Somebody already has. Last week, my organization, the Maryland Public Policy Institute (www.mdpolicy.org), published "How To Make Baltimore A Superstar City," a blueprint for reducing Baltimore's property tax rates and expanding the commercial and residential tax base for Baltimore City.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
Here's a riddle for you: When is a tax cut not a tax cut? Answer: When it happens during a contentious Republican primary race for Anne Arundel County executive. The current executive, Laura Neuman, proposed her budget for fiscal 2015 last week, and it includes a very modest reduction in Arundel's property tax rate, from 95 cents per $100 in assessed value to 94.3 cents. Her primary opponent, Del. Steve Schuh, dismissed talk of a tax cut as "misleading," arguing that she is doing no more than complying with the requirements of Anne Arundel's strict property tax cap. He's certainly right about the last part, but he's wrong if he's implying that she should have done anything different.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Council raised the county property tax rate Tuesday, as it passed a budget plan that includes a steep funding decrease to the county's community college and delays a new facility for one of its most academically successful high schools. The council has been sharply divided during deliberations over the $1.2 billion spending plan for next fiscal year, discussing changes for more than 12 hours in one day last week. Members approved the rate increase — a hike of 3 cents per $100 of assessed value that was proposed by County Executive John R. Leopold — by a 4-3 vote.
NEWS
June 4, 1996
Although Sykesville residents will be paying more county property taxes, they can look forward to a reduction in the municipal property tax rate.The Town Council unanimously passed a budget last week that is based on a 79-cent rate per $100 of assessed value. The new tax is four cents lower than last year. The town budget for fiscal 1997, which begins July 1, is $1.1 million."There was a consensus on reducing the tax rate, but the question was how much," said Matthew H. Candland, town manager.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
The Annapolis City Council cut the property tax rate by 5 cents last night as it approved with relatively little controversy a $39.6 million operating budget for the next fiscal year.The council soundly rejected a 7-cent reduction proposed by Alderman Wayne C. Turner."The council members were not persuaded that reducing the budget another 2 cents would have benefited taxpayers," said Alderman Carl O. Snowden, finance committee chairman. "It would have reduced services, and nobody was willing to do that."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | May 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Looking more like a nibbler than the budget "slasher" he claimed to be during the campaign last fall, Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall submitted a budget with few painful cuts and a stable property tax rate yesterday.For the first time in 26 years, the county executive's proposed $616.6 million budget for next year is less -- though only slightly -- than the one approved by the County Council last year.Unlike in some neighboring counties, the proposed budget will not cause any layoffs but does require the county's 12,000 employees to forgo a cost-of-living pay raise.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 7, 2004
Annapolis would hire more police employees, provide raises to city employees and lower the property tax rate under a spending plan released yesterday by Mayor Ellen O. Moyer. The mayor proposed a $57.5 million budget that would reduce the property tax rate by 2 cents, to 58 cents per $100 of assessed value. But many homeowners can expect to pay more in property taxes this year because of rising real estate assessments. The state reported last year that tax assessments in the city had risen an average of about 40 percent over three years; those new assessments are being phased in. The state limits assessment increases to 10 percent a year.
NEWS
May 2, 1996
New Windsor will keep its property tax rate at 45 cents per $100 of assessed value.Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. was to introduce a budget last night that maintains the tax rate at the same rate it has been for several years.The budget calls for a 2 percent cut in spending but still funds all town services. "The people of New Windsor would rather have the bare minimum of town services rather than pay for duplication of those same services from the county and state," said Mr. Gullo.New Windsor is the only town in the county that can function well with a part-time staff, he said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
When Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman unveiled her proposed $1.35 billion county budget on Thursday, she described it as a package that reduced the county's property tax rate "without cutting essential services or depleting our savings. " But in a political year that has already seen sharp barbs between Neuman and her opponent for the Republican nomination for county executive, Del. Steve Schuh, the tax rate issue immediately drew a rebuke from Schuh, who called the cut "inadequate and misleading.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The House of Delegates unanimously approved a bill Monday aimed at helping Baltimore retain more homeowners. The measure, which goes now to the Senate, would let city homeowners transfer a portion of their Homestead tax credit from their old dwelling to a new property for several years. It is part of a five-bill package pushed by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat, which aims to look for ways to reduce the city's high property tax rate, which is at least double that of surrounding counties.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
There is a simple and elegant solution to the problem of Baltimore City's property tax rate ( "New ideas for city taxes," Feb. 9). We live in the sovereign State of Maryland, and we should all pay the same property tax rate. One State, One Rate would benefit not only the residents of Baltimore City but also of many Maryland counties, likely including the majority of all Maryland citizens. It would the end the subsidization of rich counties by poorer counties. Bill Marker, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
The last mayoral election in Baltimore featured a spirited debate about a variety of ideas for aggressive reductions in the city's sky-high property tax rate. The winning candidate, though, was the one who called those ideas unrealistic and advocated a gradualist approach that left the basic structure of the city's property tax system intact. To her credit, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has followed through and proposed a comprehensive 10-year financial plan to reduce costs, diversify revenue streams and cut property taxes.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Annapolis city council passed Monday a $95.6 million operating budget and $10 million capital budget for next year, with a slight increase in the property tax rate and funding for projects that include a bulkhead replacement at City Dock. Mayor Josh Cohen, a Democrat, said the budget will improve government services while limiting the impact on taxpayers. "I think it's a good budget. I think it's a responsible budget," he said. Alderman Fred Paone, a Republican who voted against the measure, criticized the budget as unfixable.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Baltimore County Council members formally adopted a county budget Thursday that they say focuses on basic services while keeping the county's property tax rate flat for the 25th year in a row. The council unanimously approved County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's $2.8 billion operating budget and $339 million capital budget for the fiscal year that begins in July. Kamenetz and council members said they homed in on public education, public safety and infrastructure. "Despite slow growth in revenues, our government has maintained services at the level our citizens demand," Council Chairman Tom Quirk said in the council's budget address.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
In the off-season, Ocean City often adds some new feature for tourists: a miniature golf course perhaps, a seafood restaurant or maybe a bar that caters to the beachgoing crowd. But here's a possible addition that might not be so welcome - parking meters north of 10 t h Street. On Friday, the Ocean City Council is expected to be briefed on a proposal to create a whopping 4,800 paid parking spaces. The most ambitious version of the plan would require visitors to pay for parking at any space along the streets on the Atlantic Ocean side of Coastal Highway from 10 t h Street to the Delaware line.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
Baltimore County would add classrooms for thousands of students under a budget proposal unveiled Monday by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz - a plan advocates hope signals a commitment to solve the overcrowding that has plagued the school system. "There's an acknowledgment of the number of seats needed, and there seems to be the will to fund the additional seats," said Yara Cheikh, president of the PTA at Hampton Elementary School in Towson, the county's most overcrowded school. Kamenetz's proposal includes a $2.8 billion operating budget and a $339 million capital budget.
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