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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Members of the Anne Arundel County Council say that considering how tight money is, they're not surprised that the proposed budget to be unveiled Friday contains a property tax increase that would add $90 to the bill on a $300,000 house. "It's not surprising, given the gravity and the nature of the fiscal climate in this county," said G. James Benoit, a Democrat who represents the western area from Millersville to Laurel. Like other lawmakers, he said he hadn't seen any official budget numbers.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Howard County residents would see no property tax increase this year, but they could pay a higher fire tax under an $899 million budget proposal unveiled Friday by County Executive Ken Ulman. General fund spending, which represents money raised through local taxes and fees, would increase less than 3 percent. "It is really a maintenance budget," Ulman said of the spending plan that, if approved by the County Council, would take effect July 1. A state budget impasse has left state aid up in the air and the question of who will pay teacher pension costs unresolved, but Ulman said his plan is based on a deal made but not passed before time ran out on this year's General Assembly session.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen plans to raise $2 million through a property tax increase, paired with a $2.8 million package of spending cuts — including a hiring freeze and cuts to nearly all city departments — to balance his proposed $86.2 million budget for next fiscal year. The plans announced Wednesday were the result of an agreement between Cohen and a majority of the city council, many of whose members criticized his budget proposal when it was introduced in March. Initially, the plan included a 7.6 percent spending increase over the previous year and would not have changed the property tax rate.
EXPLORE
March 14, 2012
From The Aegis of March 19, 1987: It was possible Harford County residents would be facing a property tax rate increase 25 years ago, but they were going to have to wait two more weeks to find out until Harford County Executive Habern Freeman released his proposed budget for the next fiscal year. Freeman, who took office in 1982, raised the tax rate his first year in office, then left it the same in the following three at $2.73 per $100 of assessed value. With two weeks to go until his budget for FY 1987-1988 was due to the Harford County Council April 1, Freeman said he was still unsure as to whether he would be seeking an increase.
NEWS
April 29, 1996
IT INCLUDES only a 4 percent increase in spending over this year, but the 1996-97 Carroll County budget unveiled by the commissioners last week is based on a hefty 11.5 percent rise in the property tax rate.That 27-cent increase in the tax rate, to $2.62 per $100 of assessed valuation, is needed because of a projected $5 million BTC shortfall in revenue and a backlog of capital projects -- $25 million in roads and bridges alone -- that have been put off for years. Since 1990, Carroll has lost funding and revenues, due to reductions in federal and state aid and the business tax base, equivalent to 58 cents on the tax rate, Commissioner Donald I. Dell points out. You can "pay me now or pay me later," a familiar TV ad reminded us; later is now for Carroll County.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
The House of Delegates unanimously approved a $26 billion budget for fiscal 2006 last night, including a rollback of the property tax increase Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. proposed two years ago. The bill passed with virtually no debate as Republicans praised Ehrlich's proposal and thanked the chamber's Democratic leaders for taking their concerns seriously. "There was a lot of give-and-take in the budget, and that was reflected in the vote on the floor," said House Speaker Michael E. Busch.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | December 12, 1990
The Howard County executive told the County Council last night that the current operating budget deficit could reach $20 million and that he might have to seek council approval to borrow money from the water and sewer fund to avoid ending the fiscal year with a deficit.Charles I. Ecker, a Republican who took office this month, also gave the council a "bleak forecast for next year," when he said budget cuts, a property tax increase or both could be needed to balance the budget. He declined to specify what would be cut or how much the $2.45 property tax rate might increase.
NEWS
May 13, 1996
THE GREAT EMOTIONAL divide in Carroll County between supporters of a property tax increase and the opponents of higher taxes may not be healed by simple compromise, any more than a chasm can be spanned by half a bridge.Nevertheless, the suburbanizing county is at a critical juncture after years of political denial of its growing needs. Local taxes have got to be raised to meet those communal obligations, starting with a $5 million shortfall in budget revenue for the coming fiscal year.There is a demonstrated need for repairing roads and bridges that have been neglected over time, for building schools to teach children who cannot be put off any longer, for preserving farmland that may soon pass to developmental sprawl, for maintaining the safety net of social services and the first-class public library system that benefits all.Yes, everything can be cut back, "frills" eliminated and only "essential services" retained.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Westminster to adopt budget The Westminster City Council is expected to adopt tomorrow night its fiscal year 2007 budget that calls for increases in property taxes and water and sewer rates. The budget proposal called for a 15 percent property tax increase and a 20 percent rise in water and sewer rates, stirring opposition among residents. But officials said last week the mayor and council members are reconsidering the property tax increase. To ease the burden, the mayor and council are looking at a 10 percent property tax increase, said Joseph D. Urban, the city's finance director.
NEWS
January 18, 1991
Members of Howard County's Senate delegation are claiming they voted against a county hotel tax because their constituents are opposed to a tax increase. In fact, their refusal to sponsor the measure on behalf of County Executive Chuck Ecker will mean a big property tax increase.The vote can be viewed as little more than partisan posturing: The decision by the Democratic members of the Senate delegation left the measure with no sponsor and, as such, robbed Ecker, a Republican, of his best alternative to gouging property owners.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
The Annapolis city council approved Monday a $90 million operating budget for the next fiscal year, a spending plan that raises the city's property tax rate and increases a variety of fees for city services. The council approved Mayor Joshua J. Cohen's proposed budget by a 7-2 vote, city officials said. The city's $9.1 million capital budget was approved unanimously. The budget for fiscal year 2012 is the result of an agreement reached last month by a majority of the council.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen plans to raise $2 million through a property tax increase, paired with a $2.8 million package of spending cuts — including a hiring freeze and cuts to nearly all city departments — to balance his proposed $86.2 million budget for next fiscal year. The plans announced Wednesday were the result of an agreement between Cohen and a majority of the city council, many of whose members criticized his budget proposal when it was introduced in March. Initially, the plan included a 7.6 percent spending increase over the previous year and would not have changed the property tax rate.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
Anne Arundel County has not been tax-friendly territory. It has the strictest property tax cap in the state, thanks to a voter revolt nearly 20 years ago, and council members have been known to come close to blows over budget measures. Yet this week, guess who came up with a balanced approach — cutting services and adding new taxes — to solve its budget woes? None other than Anne Arundel County. Here we have a conservative county, led by a Republican executive and council, that — rather than clinging to the credo of never, ever raising taxes — took the common-sense step of upping the property tax 3 cents to 91 cents per $100 of assessed value.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Members of the Anne Arundel County Council say that considering how tight money is, they're not surprised that the proposed budget to be unveiled Friday contains a property tax increase that would add $90 to the bill on a $300,000 house. "It's not surprising, given the gravity and the nature of the fiscal climate in this county," said G. James Benoit, a Democrat who represents the western area from Millersville to Laurel. Like other lawmakers, he said he hadn't seen any official budget numbers.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Surely the Sun must know that Gov. Martin O'Malley's ad highlighting Bob Ehrlich's so-called 48 percent property tax hike is actually intended to cleverly deceive the vast number of uninformed Maryland voters into believing that Mr. Ehrlich's action must have been a big reason their property taxes have skyrocketed. In actual fact, of course, the increase only affected the miniscule state portion of the overall property tax at the time, with the tax rising from 8.4 cents per $100 of assessed value to 13.2 cents during the first three years of Gov. Ehrlich's administration and dropping back to 11.2 cents in 2006 (where it remains today)
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | April 15, 2008
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. is expected to present a budget today to county lawmakers that leaves them little to trim. Cost-of-living pay raises for county workers and anything else considered not essential to the daily functions of local government have already been left out of the spending plan, according to officials familiar with the final draft. The executive's budget is not expected to require a property tax increase or to raise fees.
NEWS
By Susan Canfora | April 5, 1992
County officials consider tax increaseCounty officials, working on the budget for fiscal year 1992-93, will soon decide whether to increase property taxes. The current tax rate is $1.59 per $100 of assessed property value. County departments have requested $52.4 million in funding and the county expects to get $49.3 million in revenues. To balance those figures, the commissioners will either cut requests or raise revenues.A one-cent property tax increase would generate $211,000 according to John Yankus, county administrator.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday that he will charge residents for trash pickups or raise their property taxes.Mr. Ecker made the remarks -- his strongest statement so far on the prospects for a tax increase next fiscal year -- during a Howard County Chamber of Commerce lunch.One chamber member -- David Carney, also the vice chairman of the Howard County Economic Development Authority -- said in an interview later that a property tax increase could be "stifling" to local business.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Westminster to adopt budget The Westminster City Council is expected to adopt tomorrow night its fiscal year 2007 budget that calls for increases in property taxes and water and sewer rates. The budget proposal called for a 15 percent property tax increase and a 20 percent rise in water and sewer rates, stirring opposition among residents. But officials said last week the mayor and council members are reconsidering the property tax increase. To ease the burden, the mayor and council are looking at a 10 percent property tax increase, said Joseph D. Urban, the city's finance director.
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