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NEWS
February 28, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the impending across-the-board cuts in federal spending, since the "sequester" plan originally was introduced by the White House, to call it a "GOP sequester" is a misnomer ("The GOP sequester," Feb. 22). If we had any leaders, managers or even decent administrators in the Obama administration, a spending reduction of $85 billion would a walk in the park. But no, we get a bunch of whining, doom and gloom. It can't be that bad if President Obama had time to play golf for a few days (not too mention his continuing campaigning)
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
Thank you to The Sun for your hard-hitting, front page article highlighting the abuse of power by some members of the Baltimore City Police Department ("Undue force," Sept. 28). "A disturbing pattern" and "frightful human toll" are apt expressions used in the article to which we must add "unacceptable racist practices against African Americans" to seemingly describe a culture in the Baltimore City Police Department which we all know continues to this day. We citizens of Baltimore need proof that severe measures are being taken to correct Baltimore's "national reputation of not being a professional and effective department," as you state in the article.
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EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
I must say I am puzzled by the objections by some to the use of speed cameras. Tom Laufer raised his concerns in his letter to the editor, citing the supposed lack of "proof" that you were actually speeding when caught by a camera. My question is this: When you are pulled over by a police officer for speeding, do you have any proof? Do you ask the officer to show you the data from his/her radar gun before s/he issues you a ticket? The answer, of course, is no. The real answer is that most people speed knowingly, and just hope they don't get caught.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and four other prominent institutions will spend the next five years trying to turn a theoretical "next-generation" form of encryption into a practical way to better protect software from hackers. Hopkins, the University of California, Los Angeles, Stanford University, the University of Texas and Columbia University are forming the Center for Encrypted Functionalities through a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. They are exploring a strategy known as obfuscation, which can hide the inner workings of programs from outsiders.
NEWS
July 7, 2011
I couldn't agree more with the title of Dan Rodricks ' column ("A judge long overdue for retirement," July 3). Judge Thomas J. Bollinger has made ugly waves for years with various decisions, several quoted by Mr. Rodricks, that show his disrespect, unconcern and disdain for women. Why is this man still on the bench when he is past the mandatory retirement age of 70? Doesn't this counteract the law he purportedly supports? Can't someone get him away from us so we won't hear any more disgusting judgments like giving a bishop (a bishop!
NEWS
May 10, 2011
The citizens of Baltimore are being told to believe it just because he and his advisors said it is so. Luke Scott wants all of us to accept as fact that he has a shoulder problem ("Scott has torn labrum in shoulder," May 10), yet he has failed to produce the live results of his MRI medical tests for Orioles' fans to see for themselves. Might this medical condition be a plan of action earlier conceived to have us believe his struggles are acceptable? He plans to "play through the pain, pray and believe in my miracle healing.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2013
Tidewater Players, the community theater of Havre de Grace, is tackling the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning drama, "Proof," by David Auburn. The plot revolves around a brilliant theorem, or proof, discovered after the death of a famous mathematician. But the former professor was mentally ill during the last years of his life, when he was cared for by his younger daughter, Catherine. Is it possible that he wrote the proof? If not, who did? Robert Oppel directs. For Tammy Crisp Oppel, who plays Catherine, it's not the first time she's been in a play directed by her husband.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 24, 2013
Like squirrels trying to get into a bird feeder, a share of people 20 and younger can be relied upon to take every opportunity available to countermand the law that precludes anyone younger than 21 from partaking of alcoholic beverages. Thus it comes as no surprise that yet again the matter of people using bogus identification cards as proof of age at licensed beverage retailers was before the Harford County Liquor Control Board last week. As liquor inspector Charles Robbins said last week: "It's a big problem.
NEWS
January 7, 2012
While reading Joe Burris ' article on New Year's Day, I was dumbfounded by the conclusions that were being drawn by the professors at JHU who are proposing a new calendar ("JHU professors propose new calendar," Jan. 1). They claimed that mistakes are made in scheduling with the current calendar but would be eliminated with their calendar, that there should be no objection from the religious community with their proposed changes, and that "everyone" would quickly memorize the calendar.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2004
I have a question regarding ground rent. I purchased an investment property last January, and the ground-rent owner remained unknown after a title search was completed. By law, the title company escrowed three years worth of ground rent. I refinanced the property in June but the ground-rent situation held up the process. The mortgage company needed to know who owned the ground rent or proof that no one owned it. A second title company completed a search and did not find the owner of the ground rent.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Maryland joins at least a dozen other states Tuesday in banning the sale of 190-proof grain alcohol, a measure that lawmakers hope will help to reduce sexual assaults and binge drinking among college students. The bill is one of more than 200 that go into effect Tuesday; other bills expand the earned income tax credit for low-income residents and exempt more wealthy Marylanders from the estate tax, overhaul Baltimore City liquor board practices and establish incentives to encourage investment in research universities.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Maryland senators will resume debate Wednesday on whether to outlaw the sale of grain alcohol, a colorless spirit so potent the chamber voted to ban it twice before. More than a dozen other states already forbid the sale of the 190-proof liquor, according to state analysts. The proposal has died in the House of Delegates in the past, but was revived with a new lawmakers pushing it this year. On Tuesday, the Senate took up the question of whether its prevalence on college campuses contributed to alcohol poisoning, and whether banning it would hurt small businesses that sell it. Democrat Sen. Rich Madaleno of Montgomery County said the president of Frostburg State University asked him to introduce the bill to ban substance, which is nearly pure alcohol, because of the problems it creates at colleges.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 2, 2014
Thirty-seven stabs. Thirty-seven cuts by a knife. Twice to his throat. Six times to his spine. Seven times to his shoulder. A slice to his abdomen that ripped him open like a fish. Kevin Ramsby lay on the floor of his Highland Park, Mich., home, bleeding out, waiting to die. It was 3 a.m., no one else was home, he'd been awakened by the sound of an intruder and had stumbled downstairs, his bulky frame protected only by a tennis racket he had grabbed. The intruder had a knife.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | September 24, 2013
Like squirrels trying to get into a bird feeder, a share of people 20 and younger can be relied upon to take every opportunity available to countermand the law that precludes anyone younger than 21 from partaking of alcoholic beverages. Thus it comes as no surprise that yet again the matter of people using bogus identification cards as proof of age at licensed beverage retailers was before the Harford County Liquor Control Board last week. As liquor inspector Charles Robbins said last week: "It's a big problem.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the murder trial of Philadelphia abortion provider Kermit Gosnell, we are not all stupid ("Kermit Gosnell and the 'liberal media,'" April 16). Sean Hannity is a conservative and he admits it. But The Sun editorial board is liberal, and doesn't admit it. That is the main difference between the two sides: Most conservatives admit they are, and most liberals deny they are. I heard about the Gosnell case months ago, and I am sure it was not in The Sun. Fox at least tries to let both sides have a say, but MSNBC doesn't.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 6, 2013
A bill introduced in Annapolis this legislative session would make it easier for parents to challenge school systems when they believe their special education students are not receiving a proper education. Senate Bill 691, introduced by Sen. Karen Montgomery, a Montgomery County democrat, seeks to shift the burden of proof to local school systems in due process hearings, which advocates say are usually burdensome for parents who are often outnumbered, overwhelmed and outspent when they go before an administrative judge to settle disputes.  Due process hearings--which mirror civil court trials--are one of the pivotal rights afforded to parents under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PHILLIPS and MICHAEL PHILLIPS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 2005
In the theater, an out-of-town tryout allows collaborators to work out the kinks before going into New York, or London. John Madden and Gwyneth Paltrow had a different experience with Proof. Their tryout wasn't out-of-town; it was out-of-medium. In 2002, director Madden approached Paltrow about "having a go" at David Auburn's popular play about a Chicago mathematician's daughter and her secrets, in a stage production in London. Madden and Paltrow already had a fine rapport: Paltrow won an Academy Award for her performance in Shakespeare in Love, the multiple Oscar winner directed by Madden.
NEWS
By JAMES P. RICHARDSON | August 15, 1994
The press reports a possible link between medical treatment for one condition and another illness. How does our society decide whether the treatment causes the illness? Usually we are content to allow the scientific community to gather evidence and reach a conclusion. But according to a recent editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine, a new practice has emerged: Sue those you blame. If the suits are successful, then causation has been successfully established.The belief that women with silicone-gel breast implants are more likely to suffer from arthritis and other connective-tissue disorders such as lupus is the latest example of this ''proof by suit.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the impending across-the-board cuts in federal spending, since the "sequester" plan originally was introduced by the White House, to call it a "GOP sequester" is a misnomer ("The GOP sequester," Feb. 22). If we had any leaders, managers or even decent administrators in the Obama administration, a spending reduction of $85 billion would a walk in the park. But no, we get a bunch of whining, doom and gloom. It can't be that bad if President Obama had time to play golf for a few days (not too mention his continuing campaigning)
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
We're about 10 minutes from the start pf the 85th Academy Awards -- hope you've made the final adjustments on your Oscar betting pool. Here are a few observations from Oscar's red carpet, surely one of Earth's most fascinating (not to mention fashionable) places. The award for for first celebrity to arrive goes to Kristen Chenoweth, one of the hosts of the Oscar pre-show (it was fun to watch her be so flabbergasted that Anne Hathaway actually guessed that the mystery object she was so zealously guarding was Dorothy's ruby slippers from 'The Wizard of Oz")
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