Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPromises
IN THE NEWS

Promises

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 18, 2014
When Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown stood before a room full of community development activists on Monday, he ticked off a list of promises of what he would do if he's elected governor this fall, as did the candidates who appeared before and after him. But he included this challenge: Go to my website, read my position papers, and don't stop until you get to the bottom. There, he said, you can find detailed estimates of how much all of his promises cost and how he would pay for them. Give him credit for the first part - almost all of his position papers (and there are a lot of them)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Towson University student was arrested this week after he allegedly threatened on social media to carry out an attack at the college that he said would be "Virginia Tech part 2. " Matthew David Cole, 18, was charged Thursday with making threats of mass violence and disturbing the operation of the school. He posted $100,000 bail and was released from jail Friday. "A thorough investigation is continuing, however, at this time it has been determined that there is no longer a threat to the university community," officials wrote in an email to students and staff.
Advertisement
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas Gansler's statewide tour to launch his campaign for governor entered its third day Thursday as the Democrat took his stump speech to Western Maryland. Gansler has slightly different remarks - and campaign promises - for each of the 17 stops. On Wednesday, Gansler told a crowd in Hyattsville he supported extending the Metro to National Harbor where a casino is proposed, the campaign confirmed.  Gansler also told supporters he thought a law school should be established at the historically black Bowie State University in Prince George's County, the campaign confirmed.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
An internal investigation found that the Johns Hopkins University failed to alert students, faculty and staff to what it called "a sexual assault" at a fraternity house in March 2013, the school's president said Wednesday in a letter to campus. In the letter, which accompanied the release of the university's 2013 annual security report, President Ronald J. Daniels called the failure to report the incident at Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity's house "unacceptable. " "I want to take this opportunity to reaffirm the University's commitment to the safety and well-being of all members of the Johns Hopkins community - a commitment that includes preventing sexual violence, offering support to victims, dealing firmly and fairly with alleged offenders, and keeping students, faculty and staff informed of crimes that represent a threat to our community," he said.
FEATURES
By SUSAN DEITZ | November 29, 1992
Q: This is one woman's response to the ongoing debate on the so-called "dishonesty" of women who do not call men after they "promise" they would. Men who experience this phenomenon should do a little soul-searching themselves before they blast women for being dishonest.For instance, when you asked her out, did she say "no," maybe even more than once? Did you then continue to pester her,assuming she was being "coy," or hoping that persistence would make her change her mind? Sometimes a woman will go on one date with a man just to get him off her back, and may then find herself resorting to the "I'll call you" ploy when he wants to continue the relationship.
NEWS
By Ryan Paul Haygood | May 11, 2004
IN RECOGNITION of the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's historic decision in Brown vs. Board of Education on May 17, 1954, I recently discussed Brown's legacy with seventh-grade students at Bragaw Avenue School in Newark, N.J. As I stood in front of a classroom of inquisitive and sharp black and brown children, I knew that many would become victims of the unfulfilled promises of Brown. I explained to the students that the Supreme Court's landmark decision not only ended legally enforced segregation in the public schools but also overturned the "separate but equal" doctrine that segregated all aspects of American society.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | March 1, 2010
T he rematch of Maryland vs. Duke was always going to be big. Now it's a Hollywood blockbuster. Playing Wednesday at Comcast Center: "Maryland-Duke II: Revenge of the Red-Hot Turtles." I see Harrison Ford as the explosive Gary Williams. Diego Luna as the mercurial Greivis Vasquez. Fred Armisen from "Saturday Night Live" could play the evil Coach K and pick any five young guys to play the Blue Devils starters - at least that's how Terps Nation would cast it. Then grab your $12 tub of popcorn and trash-can sized Pepsi, sit back and enjoy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
As the 2014 campaign for governor heats up, candidates of both parties are making promises of bold new programs or deep tax cuts - in many cases giving vague and sometimes implausible explanations of how they will pay for them. Whether they are Republicans calling for big tax rollbacks or Democrats proposing expensive initiatives, the candidates are making pledges that are hard to reconcile with Maryland's constitutional requirement that its budget be balanced - not just in the long run, but every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
Cicero: The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician, by Anthony Everitt. Random House, 359 pages, $25.95 British scholar Anthony Everitt is acutely aware that thousands of books and articles have been written about the 2000-year-old Roman named Marcus Tullius Cicero. So why did Everitt choose to spend years of his life adding to the voluminous literature about the philosopher politician? Two reasons. First, Everitt says, "I believe that each generation should have a chance to see a giant figure of the past from the perspective of its own time and circumstances."
NEWS
January 20, 2005
PRESIDENT Bush has made a commendable commitment to the federal Pell Grant program, which helps lower-income students attend college. In a speech in Florida last week, he pledged to eliminate the program's current $4 billion deficit and increase the maximum grant by $100 for each of the next five years. But it's not clear that the increased costs can be paid for by potential savings suggested in the president's sketchy proposal. And Mr. Bush will really need to push Congress to help him make good on his promises.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 30, 2014
The political practices of the Islamic State are terrifying: kidnapping, ransoming, ethnic cleansing and, of course, beheading. These people must be vanquished. But equally frightening is the group's key premise. Like many reactionary movements, ISIS feeds upon and nurtures the dangerous notion that somehow the world, or at least the parts over which they claim authority, can somehow be restored to an earlier, idyllic era — in this case, the 8th century. ISIS can chop off all the heads members want, but here's a newsflash for them: Try as they might to reverse history, time marches in but one direction.
NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | September 18, 2014
It sounds great on the surface that there would actually be a place in the world where opportunity and money abound, knowing no imaginable limits. Almost as though a new life, full of the freedoms, finances and prospects, is ripe for the picking from the American Dream tree. Such is the too-good-to-be-true nature of this centuries old image that has charmed foreigners to uproot their lives, families and futures to cross a border into an immense unknown: the glistening USA. But, as they say, all that glitters is not gold - something to keep in mind when considering crossing an arbitrary line in the hopes it could change one's life so radically and, more importantly, effortlessly.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As 7-year-old Zara Cheek packed her bags for her first sleep-away camp this summer, she found herself looking forward to more than just swimming, going on hikes and eating S'mores for two glorious weeks. To her, the experience meant a chance to live like a normal kid for a while - and even, quite possibly, to help thousands of others afflicted with the illness that has shaped her life. Zara, who lives in West Baltimore and started third grade this fall, is one of about 2 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, a chronic and potentially lethal disorder of the pancreas that leaves the body unable to make insulin or turn blood sugar into the energy it needs.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
City officials report that Baltimore police picked up fewer children than expected on the streets late at night after the city's new curfew law went into effect last month. Supporters of the tougher curfew say that suggests parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be indoors at night. But others question whether it's simply a result of police not enforcing the law. While it may be too soon to judge how well the curfew is being enforced, ultimately the success of the new law will depend on families getting the counseling and other services they need to address the problems that led to their kids being out late in the first place.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Towson's 54-0 loss to West Virginia on Saturday night may have been stunning to Tigers fans, but it brought on a different feeling from coach Rob Ambrose. Ambrose, who had not been shut out since Nov. 6, 2010 when Delaware beat Towson, 48-0, was critical of his team's effort against the Mountaineers, saying, “We cleared up some of the fog of the fakers. We found out the guys who talk the talk that don't walk the walk. They won't see the field. We will play the guys that love football and love each other.” During his weekly conference call organized by the Colonial Athletic Association, Ambrose elaborated on that comment.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. Today, VN/124-1 is a drug candidate with a name - galeterone - a pharmaceutical company founded on its potential and a record of strong preliminary results in clinical trials with human patients. The Food and Drug Administration has put galeterone on a fast track for approval to treat prostate cancer, which kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 6, 2014
Top Maryland officials highlighted a change in the way hospitals are charging patients for treatment - and a related push to prevent unnecessary admissions -- during a stop Wednesday in Western Maryland. Maryland has long regulated hospital rates under a unique agreement with federal officials, but has altered its waiver in a way that provides hospitals with a budget based on their projected patient population rather than a fee for every service performed. The idea is to cut costs and improve care by encouraging more preventive measures.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.