Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPromised Land
IN THE NEWS

Promised Land

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janet Heller and Janet Heller,Janet Heller is a free lance | September 12, 1990
IN 1911 MY FATHER left a small village in the Ukraine to seek a new life in America. At 16 he had never been on a train, seen an electric light bulb, or tasted chocolate. His first trip by rail took him across the face of Europe from Odessa to Rotterdam. He marveled at the sights along the way, and if the wooden seats were uncomfortable he scarcely noticed. But in his innocence, nothing had prepared him for the agony of the three-week voyage by ship across the Atlantic. Luxury accommodations and good food were not to be had for a mere $28 -- the cost of his one way passage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 24, 2014
It was an angry book. Much of the response was angry, too. Some towns banned it, some towns burned it. Every town talked about it. "The Grapes of Wrath" was published 75 years ago this month, a seminal masterpiece of American literature that seems freshly relevant to this era of wealth disparity, rapacious banks and growing poverty. John Steinbeck introduced readers to the Joads, a poor, proud clan of Depression-era Oklahoma farmers who...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1995
THE PROMISED LANDVarious Artists (Columbia 66969)As a social document, the Discovery Channel series "The Promised Land" offers a fascinating look at why and how blacks moved from the rural South to the urban North. As an album, "The Promised Land" tells an equally complex, somewhat more diffuse tale. In addition to an impressive array of historical recordings documenting the shifting tides of American popular music -- everything from Robert Johnson's "Sweet Home Chicago" to Sly and the Family Stone's "Stand" to Public Enemy's "Bring the Noise" -- this double album also includes new recordings that demonstrate how that heritage continues to make its impact felt.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | January 16, 2010
T he poet Langston Hughes called Harlem the "Negro Capital of the World," and in the 1950s, when I was growing up there, it really was. The great northern migration of Southern blacks that began near the turn of the last century had made Harlem the largest African-American community in the country, and people still looked back with pride to the remarkable flowering of black arts and culture of the 1920s known as the Harlem Renaissance. So I was somewhat nonplused by a recent report that African-Americans no longer constitute a majority in Harlem.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
DHEKELIA, Cyprus - Mohammed Ali Ibrahim and his wife, Avin, thought they were heading for Italy when they paid $5,000 to human smugglers and sailed from Lebanon in 1998. But their leaky 36-foot boat, crammed with 82 passengers, swamped off this eastern Mediterranean island. As the passengers bailed and the boat sank, Ibrahim found himself thinking, "It's better for me to die" than to have remained in Iraq. The Ibrahims were lucky. They and their fellow passengers were rescued by the British military.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2007
Once in a Promised Land Laila Halaby Beacon / 338 pages / $23.95 Dislocation is something few Americans know anything about, but it might well be the very thing that will define our lives for decades to come. Dislocation is a variation on disenfranchisement. Disenfranchisement is alleged to be the main reason people become terrorists. Fear of terrorism in a post-Sept. 11 world has led to a presumption that all Arabs are potential terrorists, potential killers - dangerous and untrustworthy.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 11, 1995
I did not think there'd ever be a television documentary about the black experience to rival PBS' "Eyes on the Prize." But "The Promised Land," which starts tomorrow night at 9 on the Discovery cable channel, is at least in the same league.It's impossible to talk about "Promised Land" without talking about "Eyes." They cover much of the same ground, but go about it in different ways.Whereas "Eyes" followed the birth and early years of the civil rights movement in the South, "Promised Land" focuses on a few rural Mississippians, tracing their journey from the cotton fields they share-cropped north to the promised land of Chicago.
SPORTS
December 3, 2006
On Ravens' loss to Cincinnati and whether it will cost them home-field advantage in the playoffs "I don't think so. ... Only thing you can do with a game like this is forget about it and press on." "Home-field advantage is way overrated. What teams in the AFC for the past several years have won the Super Bowl? No No. 1 seeds, that's for sure." "The Ravens now have to play an extra game, probably on the road to get to the promised land. I'm just sick over this. The Ravens totally were outplayed."
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
In his 1972 novel, Enemies, A Love Story, Isaac Bashevis Singer's protagonist Herman Broder happens upon a boisterous scene in a social hall at a Jewish resort in the Catskills. World War II has just ended, and yet the hall resounds with laughter. Even refugees from Hitler have joined in the revelry. "Why is it all so painful to me?" asks Broder, a Holocaust survivor himself. The scene, he decides, "shamed the agony of the Holocaust." At the end of Singer's tale, it is those who are still able to laugh who ultimately survive their horrific experience at the hands of the Nazis and go on to construct a new, Jewish-American identity.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 28, 2002
There has been no shortage of eloquent images and enterprise reporting when it comes to covering the horrible escalation of death and destruction in Israel and the West Bank. PBS' Frontline, for example, has been outstanding in going behind the scenes to show and tell what's happening beyond the headlines this past year. But there is another level of public-affairs reporting at which television seldom excels: the realm of ideas. Arab and Jew: Return to the Promised Land, a PBS documentary by Baltimore filmmaker Rob Gardner and Pulitzer Prize-winning former New York Times Middle East correspondent David K. Shipler, airing on MPT tonight, is mostly about ideas.
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross III | February 5, 2009
When I first met Michael S. Steele, I was a young congressional press secretary and he was an obscure Republican chairman in an overwhelmingly Democratic county. His youth, polish and affability were immediately apparent, but I was most impressed by his determination and commitment to the goal of creating a two-party system in Maryland. After our meeting, then-Congressman Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. remarked that Mr. Steele "is the future of the Republican Party." Last week, this prediction came true as Mr. Steele became chairman of the Republican National Committee.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | February 18, 2007
Once in a Promised Land Laila Halaby Beacon / 338 pages / $23.95 Dislocation is something few Americans know anything about, but it might well be the very thing that will define our lives for decades to come. Dislocation is a variation on disenfranchisement. Disenfranchisement is alleged to be the main reason people become terrorists. Fear of terrorism in a post-Sept. 11 world has led to a presumption that all Arabs are potential terrorists, potential killers - dangerous and untrustworthy.
SPORTS
December 3, 2006
On Ravens' loss to Cincinnati and whether it will cost them home-field advantage in the playoffs "I don't think so. ... Only thing you can do with a game like this is forget about it and press on." "Home-field advantage is way overrated. What teams in the AFC for the past several years have won the Super Bowl? No No. 1 seeds, that's for sure." "The Ravens now have to play an extra game, probably on the road to get to the promised land. I'm just sick over this. The Ravens totally were outplayed."
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
In his 1972 novel, Enemies, A Love Story, Isaac Bashevis Singer's protagonist Herman Broder happens upon a boisterous scene in a social hall at a Jewish resort in the Catskills. World War II has just ended, and yet the hall resounds with laughter. Even refugees from Hitler have joined in the revelry. "Why is it all so painful to me?" asks Broder, a Holocaust survivor himself. The scene, he decides, "shamed the agony of the Holocaust." At the end of Singer's tale, it is those who are still able to laugh who ultimately survive their horrific experience at the hands of the Nazis and go on to construct a new, Jewish-American identity.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 28, 2002
There has been no shortage of eloquent images and enterprise reporting when it comes to covering the horrible escalation of death and destruction in Israel and the West Bank. PBS' Frontline, for example, has been outstanding in going behind the scenes to show and tell what's happening beyond the headlines this past year. But there is another level of public-affairs reporting at which television seldom excels: the realm of ideas. Arab and Jew: Return to the Promised Land, a PBS documentary by Baltimore filmmaker Rob Gardner and Pulitzer Prize-winning former New York Times Middle East correspondent David K. Shipler, airing on MPT tonight, is mostly about ideas.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 14, 2002
WASHINGTON -- "... I ran. There was a bullet in me trying to take my life, all 13 years of it." With those startling words on its opening page, Claude Brown's book Manchild in the Promised Land opens a rare and riveting window into his dangerous journey from theft, drugs and juvenile detention on the streets of mid-20th century Harlem to eventual redemption and education at Howard University and Rutgers University Law School. The 1965 semi-autobiographical novel sold 4 million copies and still sells more than 30,000 copies a year as required reading in many classrooms.
NEWS
By RONALD H. BROWN | January 16, 1995
Raj Gat, India. -- In 1893 a young attorney named Mohandas Gandhi was thrown off a South African train for refusing to sit in a segregated car reserved for ''coloreds.''Jolted by the experience, Gandhi spent 20 years battling racism in South Africa. Returning to India, he spent the remainder of his life struggling to expel the British Raj and unite the people of this nation. Gandhi's medium was nonviolent protest, satyagraha, a courageous political philosophy that demands of its disciples extraordinary discipline and love, and challenges not the power, but the conscience of its opponents.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 2000
Mount Pisgah AME Church can be proud of how far it has grown beyond its modest beginnings of 100 years ago in a log cabin near Howard High School. Yet it was not the church but Jesus who was the focus Sunday as the congregation raised its voice in praise and worship at a Christmas sing-along service. At its spacious new building in east Columbia, purchased in 1996 from Covenant Baptist Church, six choirs performed Christmas carols and songs to the accompaniment of piano, guitar and drums.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.