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By Andrea K. Walker | March 18, 2011
Prom season is around the corner, but not every teenage girl can afford a dress. JCpenney doesn't want that to stop girls from taking part in what can be a high schoolers most memorable night. The retailer is hosting a donation drive to collect gently used prom dresses for needy girls. The drive started last weekend and runs through April 2. The dresses will be collected at JCPenney stores and then donated to local after school charities, which will make them available to underprivileged girls in the community.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
One lucky girl looking for a prom dress could end up with a pageant gown worn by a reigning Miss Maryland, who has donated her pink, fluffy, beaded dress to Project Prom Dress. The Howard County chapter of the American Red Cross is hosting the resale event for donated, gently worn prom dresses, party dresses, pageant dresses and dress accessories as a way to provide assistance to girls looking for just the right prom dresses without the eye-popping price tags. Prices range from $25 to $75, and Red Cross officials say that all of the proceeds will go to the organization.
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NEWS
March 5, 2006
Parents and students can clean their closets and make some cash during Prom Fest, an event scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Winters Mill High School in Westminster. A parents committee at the school is sponsoring the event to sell new and used prom dresses to help raise funds for Class of 2006 activities. Prom Fest organizers also have invited local florists, limousine owners, hair and nail stylists, and tuxedo and jewelry retailers to showcase their wares and services. All sales are final, and payments must be made in cash.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker | March 18, 2011
Prom season is around the corner, but not every teenage girl can afford a dress. JCpenney doesn't want that to stop girls from taking part in what can be a high schoolers most memorable night. The retailer is hosting a donation drive to collect gently used prom dresses for needy girls. The drive started last weekend and runs through April 2. The dresses will be collected at JCPenney stores and then donated to local after school charities, which will make them available to underprivileged girls in the community.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
Prom season is fast approaching. And for most high school girls that means buying a fancy dress to be worn a grand total of once.Ellen Barth, an Atholton High School junior, thought there must be a better way, so she came up with a project to recycle old prom dresses, make some money and help the community in the process.Beginning today, county high school girls can donate their nearly new prom dresses or place them on consignment to be sold to other high school girls as part of Project PROMise.
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 8, 1991
Prom 1991 is synonymous with sophistication.Gone are those corny looks such as wearing tennis shoes with your tux or costume-like Southern deb dresses with hoop skirts. Guys are going for classic black tuxedos or the James Bond look spotless white dinner jackets with black tuxedo pants. Girls are opting for dresses with lots of "S"-appeal short, strapless, sizzling.You want your prom to be as special as it can be. To help, we've consulted with designers, manufacturers, retailers and magazine editors to find out about what's in and what's out:GOWN GAB Your prom dress is simply the most important outfit for the most important night of the year right?
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1996
THE WESTMINSTER High Parent Boosters, Class of 1998 will present Prom Fair '96 for its fifth year. The fair will be held in the lobby of Westminster High School, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 23, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 24.At this annual event, girls can sell their old prom dresses and 25 percent of the profit goes to the Parent Boosters. Dresses may be dropped off in the lobby of the school from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday or March 16 and again from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 19.Girls from all over the county may take advantage of this sale of "worn-once" quality prom dresses.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
At 18, Ellen Barth has already left an impression on Atholton High School and the community by her leadership.She maintains a 4.0 grade point average, calculates equations for the math team, plays on the tennis squad and sings jazz.But her most lasting high school achievement is Project PROMise, a consignment shop she began last spring to raise money for charities by reselling prom dresses.Ellen's efforts recently won her the Principal's Leadership Award, one of 150 $1,000 scholarships given nationally to high school students who show outstanding initiative.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
A satin wedding dress, statuettes made from pecan flour paste and polyester resin, herbal cigarettes imported from India, an S-cup bra -- they are all available at the Randallstown Flea Market, which features more than fake plants, cheap clothes and used kitchen goods.The flea market was opened at 8514 Liberty Road to fill a void left when the Edmondson Drive-In flea market closed nearly four years ago. Manager Malcolm M. McKnight said it draws about 1,100 customers each weekend day and celebrates its first anniversary this month.
FEATURES
By Susanne Althoff and Susanne Althoff,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
Stay away from one thing this prom season: Pink. That is, unless you're wearing a ballerina-inspired dress.Besides this stipulation, everything else is in."It's so eclectic," said Karen Tina Harrison, the fashion and beauty editor of Your Prom magazine.This "anything goes" attitude means girls will be wearing strapless sequined dresses with slits, flapper styles with fringes, fairy tale-inspired ruffled gowns, and tank dresses with feather boa hems. An upcoming Seventeen magazine fashion show will even match motorcycle jackets and boots with prom dresses.
NEWS
March 5, 2006
Parents and students can clean their closets and make some cash during Prom Fest, an event scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Winters Mill High School in Westminster. A parents committee at the school is sponsoring the event to sell new and used prom dresses to help raise funds for Class of 2006 activities. Prom Fest organizers also have invited local florists, limousine owners, hair and nail stylists, and tuxedo and jewelry retailers to showcase their wares and services. All sales are final, and payments must be made in cash.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and By Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | April 14, 2002
Fortunately, proms aren't populated by Southern-belle dresses and powder-blue tuxes anymore, but there are almost too many choices today. How do you decide? Macy's offers these suggestions -- both conservative and contemporary -- to help young women figure out what's hot for prom 2002. Take a look: Style -- Traditional ball gowns and romantic floor-length dresses are still the rage, but a new offering this season suits the urban sophisticate: feminine, fitted tuxedos in dramatic black, cream or silver.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1999
THE POET Alfred, Lord Tennyson wrote "In the spring, a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." And in Columbia, a young girl's thoughts turn to a dress for the prom.A new prom dress can cost between $90 and $200 at the mall. If that sounds a little pricey, consider shopping at Project PROMise, a prom and formal wear consignment shop in Wilde Lake Village Center.Ellen Barth had the idea to open the shop in 1993, when she was a student at Atholton High School.Barth would pass the Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center -- a shelter for the homeless -- every day on her way to school.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Michelle Bovalino thumbs through dresses in the Brass Plum department at Nordstrom. Slinky lime knits, stunning black silks, a flighty voile in pink flowers, a glittering white number. But to Bovalino's mind, nothing.The senior prom is nearly upon her, and all around, girls are buying. Her friends at Fayetteville-Manlius High School outside Syracuse, N.Y., have already chosen their dresses, but they hang onto the receipts, waiting for that other essential element: dates.At least Bovalino has her man -- had her choice of them, actually.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 1997
"THANK HEAVEN for little girls," I muttered as I trekked through the mall with my teen-ager. That phrase has become my personal mantra I've uttered it so often. Daughters can do that to you -- just ask my mother.Normally, I wouldn't be included on a fashion scouting expedition since, as I have been told, I am hopelessly "out of it." But exceptions can be granted, especially when it's prom time and your child is out of ready cash to finance Cinderella's appearance on her own.All things considered, it turned out to be a pleasant buying trip -- not marred by many arguments -- an unusual enough experience as parents with teen-agers know.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | January 5, 1997
I HAVE ONE WORD for you," he said. "Bell-bottoms."It was just another day of arguing with my adolescent son, but he had stopped cold our verbal tail-chasing with a reference to my fashion past.It had begun when I questioned the wisdom of wearing jeans too wide to stay on your hips when you are already having trouble with tennis shoes too heavy to lift your feet. Doesn't this combination of sagging and shuffling invite tripping and falling, I asked.Joe explained that oversized jeans were necessary to showcase wildly patterned boxer shorts.
NEWS
By CINDY PARR | March 7, 1994
Believe it or not, prom season is just around the corner and that means it won't be long before teen-age girls start to search for the perfect dress.Parents shudder at the thought of how much it will cost to deck out their darlings. It's a special night, but why break the bank?With that thought in mind, I'll offer a viable option that will save buyers some greenbacks and present a creative shopping experience for this year's prom-goer.Why not check out the third annual Prom Fair '94, which will take place March 18-20 in the vacated Country Willows store in Cranberry Mall.
NEWS
March 19, 1993
Judging by the heated resistance from some students to the state's new community service requirement for high school graduation, one could get the impression there isn't a student left who thought about anything other than dates, facial blemishes and the latest fashions.Then, one comes across Ellen Barth, a 17-year-old junior at Atholton High School in Columbia, who is taking something as seemingly extravagant as prom wear and using it to help the less fortunate.Miss Barth is the founder of Project PROMise.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 1996
THE WESTMINSTER High Parent Boosters, Class of 1998 will present Prom Fair '96 for its fifth year. The fair will be held in the lobby of Westminster High School, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 23, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 24.At this annual event, girls can sell their old prom dresses and 25 percent of the profit goes to the Parent Boosters. Dresses may be dropped off in the lobby of the school from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday or March 16 and again from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 19.Girls from all over the county may take advantage of this sale of "worn-once" quality prom dresses.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
A satin wedding dress, statuettes made from pecan flour paste and polyester resin, herbal cigarettes imported from India, an S-cup bra -- they are all available at the Randallstown Flea Market, which features more than fake plants, cheap clothes and used kitchen goods.The flea market was opened at 8514 Liberty Road to fill a void left when the Edmondson Drive-In flea market closed nearly four years ago. Manager Malcolm M. McKnight said it draws about 1,100 customers each weekend day and celebrates its first anniversary this month.
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