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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 25, 2011
William E. Hewitt, the longtime Senator Theatre projectionist and movie house manager who was a cinema technology expert, died of pneumonia Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Hamilton resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook and in Elkridge, he was a 1954 Howard County High School graduate. "His career in film began in high school," said his brother, John E. Hewitt of Glen Burnie. "He was the one who could run the 16-millimeter Bell and Howell projector.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
William E. Hewitt, the longtime Senator Theatre projectionist and movie house manager, who was a cinema technology expert, died of pneumonia Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Hamilton resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook and in Elkridge, he was a 1954 Howard County High School graduate. "His career in film began in high school," said his brother, John E. Hewitt of Glen Burnie. "He was the one who could run the 16-mm Bell and Howell projector.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Joseph S. Grabowski, a retired WJZ-TV projectionist and avid golfer, died Thursday of cancer at Harbor Hospital Center. The longtime Brooklyn Park resident was 73. Mr. Grabowski, known as "TV Joe" or "Grabo," was a popular figure in the Television Hill studio of the station, where he began his career in 1958. "Grabo was one of those guys who made the place work even though he was always behind the scenes in the tape room. It was not glamorous," WJZ-TV personality Marty Bass said Friday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Joseph S. Grabowski, a retired WJZ-TV projectionist and avid golfer, died Thursday of cancer at Harbor Hospital Center. The longtime Brooklyn Park resident was 73. Mr. Grabowski, known as "TV Joe" or "Grabo," was a popular figure in the Television Hill studio of the station, where he began his career in 1958. "Grabo was one of those guys who made the place work even though he was always behind the scenes in the tape room. It was not glamorous," WJZ-TV personality Marty Bass said Friday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 10, 1992
Robert Goings, 29, the long-time janitor at the Charles Theatre whose struggle with leukemia was described in a story in the Today section last Friday, died Sunday night at the Joseph Richey House, a hospice on Eutaw Street.According to Gary Lambert, the Charles' projectionist who had cared for Mr. Goings over the past weeks, Mr. Goings told his nurse he felt worse Saturday and on Sunday had two bouts of sickness that left him weak, but he rallied from each. At 10:30 p.m. he told a nurse he felt "strange," and lay back and closed his eyes.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 1997
Soon now, people will be listing 100 great 20th-century Baltimoreans. If your hero or heroine is slighted, do not lament. The public mind will quickly forget the winners too.John Gottlieb Morris surely qualified for a 19th-century list, and just as surely he is unknown today - even to most of Lutherville.Morris (1803-1895) was born in York, Pa., to an upper-class family of German Protestants named Moritz. But at age 23, educated at Princeton and Dickinson, he moved to Baltimore, accepting a call from First English Lutheran Church.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 4, 1992
It is pointless to feel sorry for Robert Goings, who is 29 and has leukemia, because Goings does not feel sorry for himself.enjoy my life," he says, blinking brightly in the living room of a hospice for the dying on Eutaw Street. And thousands of Baltimoreans have enjoyed what Goings did with his life as well, although they don't know who he is or why he was important.Professionally, Goings was in the movies, just as surely as a Dustin Hoffman, a Warren Beatty or a John Waters. They just happen to be a little bit better known, but no more valuable.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
Garey Lambert, a tireless and courageous advocate for people with AIDS, lost his own fight against the disease yesterday and died at Johns Hopkins Hospital, surrounded by family and friends. He was 49.Alfred Garey Lambert III, known best by his middle name, died late in the afternoon with his daughter, Kathryn, 17, holding his hand. More than 20 people from his very wide circle of friends had gathered in his room as his life ran out with the day."He was awake and alert until the very end," said Dr. Richard Chaisson, the director of the Hopkins AIDS service who spent much of the day with Mr. Lambert.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
John Standiford, president and would-be resuscitator of the Charles Theatre, is sitting in his comfortably disheveled second-story office on a Friday afternoon anticipating tonight's gate. A new movie, "Celestial Clockwork," which he doesn't like very much, is beginning its run this evening, as is "Lone Star" a critically acclaimed film that Standiford is counting on for a needed infusion of cash.Unfortunately, money -- and the lack thereof -- is in the forefront of Standiford's mind these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Downloading movies and watching them on a computer is not for George Figgs, who has spent the better part of three decades affording Baltimore cinephiles the chance to experience films the way God intended - in the dark, projected onto a bigger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a bunch of people whose only commonality is an urge to see how the on-screen story plays out. "I think people are tired of going to Netflix or Google or whatever, and...
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 1997
Soon now, people will be listing 100 great 20th-century Baltimoreans. If your hero or heroine is slighted, do not lament. The public mind will quickly forget the winners too.John Gottlieb Morris surely qualified for a 19th-century list, and just as surely he is unknown today - even to most of Lutherville.Morris (1803-1895) was born in York, Pa., to an upper-class family of German Protestants named Moritz. But at age 23, educated at Princeton and Dickinson, he moved to Baltimore, accepting a call from First English Lutheran Church.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
John Standiford, president and would-be resuscitator of the Charles Theatre, is sitting in his comfortably disheveled second-story office on a Friday afternoon anticipating tonight's gate. A new movie, "Celestial Clockwork," which he doesn't like very much, is beginning its run this evening, as is "Lone Star" a critically acclaimed film that Standiford is counting on for a needed infusion of cash.Unfortunately, money -- and the lack thereof -- is in the forefront of Standiford's mind these days.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
Garey Lambert, a tireless and courageous advocate for people with AIDS, lost his own fight against the disease yesterday and died at Johns Hopkins Hospital, surrounded by family and friends. He was 49.Alfred Garey Lambert III, known best by his middle name, died late in the afternoon with his daughter, Kathryn, 17, holding his hand. More than 20 people from his very wide circle of friends had gathered in his room as his life ran out with the day."He was awake and alert until the very end," said Dr. Richard Chaisson, the director of the Hopkins AIDS service who spent much of the day with Mr. Lambert.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 10, 1992
Robert Goings, 29, the long-time janitor at the Charles Theatre whose struggle with leukemia was described in a story in the Today section last Friday, died Sunday night at the Joseph Richey House, a hospice on Eutaw Street.According to Gary Lambert, the Charles' projectionist who had cared for Mr. Goings over the past weeks, Mr. Goings told his nurse he felt worse Saturday and on Sunday had two bouts of sickness that left him weak, but he rallied from each. At 10:30 p.m. he told a nurse he felt "strange," and lay back and closed his eyes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 4, 1992
It is pointless to feel sorry for Robert Goings, who is 29 and has leukemia, because Goings does not feel sorry for himself.enjoy my life," he says, blinking brightly in the living room of a hospice for the dying on Eutaw Street. And thousands of Baltimoreans have enjoyed what Goings did with his life as well, although they don't know who he is or why he was important.Professionally, Goings was in the movies, just as surely as a Dustin Hoffman, a Warren Beatty or a John Waters. They just happen to be a little bit better known, but no more valuable.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 1997
Did they see Will in the mall?Did they see Will in the hall?Did they see Will in the gym?Is it really, truly him?Ever since actor Will Smith held a news conference at the Columbia Inn to announce that he would be filming "Enemy of the State" in the area, sightings have occurred with alien frequency in Howard County.Rumors abounded that the "Independence Day" star was staying at the Columbia Inn. That the "Man in Black" bought a shirt at Britches in the mall. That he was playing hoops at a local athletic club.
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