Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProject Liberty Ship
IN THE NEWS

Project Liberty Ship

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 14, 1997
Taneytown residents no longer will be able to pay water and sewer bills at local banks.The City Council voted Monday to drop the quarterly bank payment option, effective with next month's water and sewer bills.City officials reported that communication glitches with banks caused the city to send overdue notices to several customers who had paid their bills.The city signed an agreement with local banks in January 1995 to collect payments as a convenience to customers.Residents may mail their bills, pay them at City Hall during business hours or leave payments in a 24-hour drop box at the city office entrance, 17 E. Baltimore St.Project Liberty Ship to hold fund-raiserProject Liberty Ship, a preservation group working to save the Liberty ship S.S. John W. Brown, will hold an Adopt-a-Rivet program at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8806, Penrose Street, Union Bridge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Frederick A. "Fritz" Glos, a retired machinist and World War II veteran who volunteered onboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Friday of complications from leukemia at a stepdaughter's Perry Hall home. He was 89. Frederick Adam "Fritz" Glos was born in Baltimore and raised on North Port Street. He attended city public schools and then joined the merchant marine. He joined the Navy in 1942 at Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Cecil County and became a gunner's mate and later worked in aviation ordnance.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
Maurice E. Lizotte, a retired ship's navigator and member of Baltimore's Project Liberty Ship, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Harbor Hospital Center. The Pasadena resident was 84. Mr. Lizotte, who was known as Mel, was born and raised in Detroit. He enlisted in the Navy before World War II, and served aboard a fleet oiler in the Pacific during the war years. "He really had a pretty interesting Navy career. His ship refueled the carrier Lexington before the great engagement in the Coral Sea where she was sunk in 1942," said Capt.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
The last time Donald Halverson was on a Liberty ship, he was heading across the Atlantic Ocean, a fresh-faced draftee who would spend the next 21/2 years fighting his way across Germany, France, Italy and North Africa during World War II. A more recent trip, a leisurely six-hour sail down the Chesapeake Bay on the refurbished Liberty ship John W. Brown, a floating museum that has been plying the waters around Baltimore since 1991, proved a lot more...
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 13, 1997
Fifty-five years ago, the John W. Brown sailed the world's oceans, carrying cargo and troops to the hot spots of World War II.Today, one of two remaining Liberty ships, the ship sits at Pier I off Clinton Street in Baltimore, close to where it was built at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Fairfield shipyard in the early 1940s.Returned to Baltimore in 1988, the John W. Brown has been restored to the point that it is "a complete viable ship, not involved in the shipping trade but on the Historic Register," said Richard Stultz of Union Bridge, one of 42 crew members who sail the ship short distances along the East Coast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2002
John C. Rhodes, a World War II Navy veteran who helped restore the John W. Brown as a longtime Project Liberty Ship volunteer, died of leukemia Monday at his home in Millers. He was 79. A Baltimore native who was raised in the Hamilton section, he graduated from Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Rhodes enlisted in the Navy in 1941. As a gunner's mate, he was a member of the Armed Guard, which operated defensive guns that protected ships from aerial and submarine attacks. He served aboard Liberty ships, an aircraft carrier, tankers and landing craft in the Atlantic and Pacific theaters.
NEWS
October 22, 2004
Joseph C. Merrick, a retired Mack Trucks vice president and Project Liberty Ship volunteer officer who served in the Canadian navy, the U.S. merchant marine and the Army six decades ago, died from stroke complications Monday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 79. Mr. Merrick was born in Glendale, Calif., and raised there and in Victoria, British Columbia. He served in the Canadian navy from 1943 to 1944, when he left to join the merchant marine. "He left the Canadian navy after seeing the food that the U.S. merchant mariners were getting.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2002
One of the most locally historic Christmas cards to arrive this holiday season was sent by Capt. Brian H. Hope, a member of the Association of Maryland Pilots, former chairman of Project Liberty Ship and a self-taught artist. As chairman of Project Liberty Ship, Hope led the volunteer effort that brought the SS John W. Brown, one of the nation's two surviving operational World War II Liberty ships, to Baltimore. In his spare moments when he is not bringing ships up or down the Chesapeake Bay, he enjoys painting maritime scenes in the studio of his Ellicott City home.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
The veterans' creased and age-spotted hands gripped gray railings yesterday as they boarded the John W. Brown. Peering up the steep gangway as the 60-year-old Liberty ship prepared to sail from North Locust Point to the Key Bridge and back, three veterans recalled a time when they were strong-muscled enough to scramble up a rope ladder. "When you are 17 years old and half-crazy, you didn't give a damn," said William Kalwa, a 75-year-old veteran from Dundalk, who with pals Jim Maginnis, 81, of Rosedale, and Don Mason, 75, of Eastwood, took a free ride on the John W. Brown as part of an annual tribute to area veterans and those killed in foreign wars.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Leo T. Vogelsang, a retired railroader and volunteer who helped restore the SS John W. Brown, died of brain cancer Monday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The Winfield resident was 75. Mr. Vogelsang was born and raised in Southwest Baltimore and attended city public schools. He was 17 when he joined the merchant marine during World War II, and became a fireman, oiler and water tender aboard the Liberty ship SS John S. Mosby and the tanker Gulfgem. Returning to Baltimore after the war, he was employed as a dock worker for the Western Maryland Railway from 1947 until enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1950.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 10, 2010
Richard Lee Stultz, former mayor of Union Bridge and a Korean War veteran, died Sept. 27 of a cerebral hemorrhage at Carroll Hospital Center. He was 81. Mr. Stultz, the son of a Lehigh Portland Cement Co. worker and a homemaker, was born in Hagerstown and raised in Union Bridge. He was a 1947 graduate of Elmer Wolfe High School and during the Korean War served with the Navy's amphibious forces of the Atlantic Squadron. Mr. Stultz worked as a carpenter for more than 40 years for Lehigh Portland Cement Co. in Union Bridge, until retiring in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
Louis J. Jerbi, a retired Social Security Administration adviser who parlayed his love of the sea and ships into being an active volunteer aboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Saturday of an aneurysm at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Phoenix, Baltimore County, resident was 60. Mr. Jerbi was stricken early Saturday morning while onboard the John W. Brown, which is docked at Pier 1, Clinton Street, in Canton, and died en route to the hospital, family members said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
DeLacy L. "Cookie" Cook, a World War II merchant mariner and retired port captain for United States Lines who later became chief engineer of the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Monday of sepsis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Lutherville resident was 85. Mr. Cook was born in Pasadena, Calif., and raised in Santa Ana, Calif., where he graduated from Santa Ana High School. "Why did I go to sea? I lived at the beach in California, spent a lot of time there growing up. I just fell into it," he told former Sun editor and John W. Brown volunteer Ernest F. Imhoff, whose book Good Shipmates chronicled the story of the reactivation in Baltimore of the World War II-era Liberty ship.
NEWS
October 22, 2004
Joseph C. Merrick, a retired Mack Trucks vice president and Project Liberty Ship volunteer officer who served in the Canadian navy, the U.S. merchant marine and the Army six decades ago, died from stroke complications Monday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 79. Mr. Merrick was born in Glendale, Calif., and raised there and in Victoria, British Columbia. He served in the Canadian navy from 1943 to 1944, when he left to join the merchant marine. "He left the Canadian navy after seeing the food that the U.S. merchant mariners were getting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2003
Maurice E. Lizotte, a retired ship's navigator and member of Baltimore's Project Liberty Ship, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Harbor Hospital Center. The Pasadena resident was 84. Mr. Lizotte, who was known as Mel, was born and raised in Detroit. He enlisted in the Navy before World War II, and served aboard a fleet oiler in the Pacific during the war years. "He really had a pretty interesting Navy career. His ship refueled the carrier Lexington before the great engagement in the Coral Sea where she was sunk in 1942," said Capt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Leo T. Vogelsang, a retired railroader and volunteer who helped restore the SS John W. Brown, died of brain cancer Monday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The Winfield resident was 75. Mr. Vogelsang was born and raised in Southwest Baltimore and attended city public schools. He was 17 when he joined the merchant marine during World War II, and became a fireman, oiler and water tender aboard the Liberty ship SS John S. Mosby and the tanker Gulfgem. Returning to Baltimore after the war, he was employed as a dock worker for the Western Maryland Railway from 1947 until enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1950.
NEWS
November 29, 1999
Liberty Ship project preserves city's past, enhances the harborThe Sun's editorial ("Success may kill unique Inner Harbor," Nov. 19) makes a valid point about exercising control over Baltimore's waterfront, but the future home of Liberty Ship John W. Brown is not a good example of unseemly growth.Baltimore is a historic port, seeking to celebrate its rich maritime heritage. Now, a nonprofit group, Project Liberty Ship, not only wants to contribute to that heritage, but help transform an eyesore in the industrial area of Key Highway.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Frederick A. "Fritz" Glos, a retired machinist and World War II veteran who volunteered onboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Friday of complications from leukemia at a stepdaughter's Perry Hall home. He was 89. Frederick Adam "Fritz" Glos was born in Baltimore and raised on North Port Street. He attended city public schools and then joined the merchant marine. He joined the Navy in 1942 at Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Cecil County and became a gunner's mate and later worked in aviation ordnance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.