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Project Labor Agreement

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NEWS
By Mark Ayers | January 30, 2012
There has been a lot said and written about a project labor agreement (PLA) being implemented for the proposed Maryland offshore wind energy project. When the time arrives for investments to be made in the construction of this critical project, there will be essentially two business models from which the state of Maryland can choose to place its scare resources. The first is a business model that is epitomized by the use of PLAs. PLAs are a market-based tool that offer increased job-site efficiencies, productivity, and on-time, on-budget results through a steady, local supply of the world's safest, most highly trained and productive skilled craft workforce - a workforce that has been developed through almost $1 billion a year in private investments in craft apprenticeship programs.
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NEWS
By Vance T. Ayres | November 13, 2012
The case often argued against project labor agreements (PLAs) - that they are somehow exclusionary, allegedly favor union contractors and union workers, etc. - misses the mark. The true test of PLAs, which are single-site craft labor agreements used for large construction projects, should not focus on contractors or workers. The true worth and value of PLAs must be examined through the viewpoint of the project owner. After all, the owner is the one paying tens of millions of dollars (or hundreds of millions or even billions)
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
As the Glendening administration considers whether to impose pro-union work rules on one of the biggest construction projects in Maryland history, it is relying on the advice of a consultant known to advocate such requirements. The consulting firm, Parsons Corp. of Pasadena, Calif., will help the state decide contract terms for the $2 billion replacement of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge. Those terms could discourage many of Maryland's nonunion contractors from competing for the work.
NEWS
By Pless B. Jones Sr | August 7, 2012
It seems you can't turn on the television or the radio this summer without hearing some voice extolling the virtues of bringing a sixth casino to Maryland - this one to be built inPrince George's County. And while there is an active public dialogue on the issue of expanded gaming, it is important for Marylanders to understand what is being promised and what may underlie the rhetoric. One particular element of the proponents' campaign deserves clarification - the jobs promised. As The Baltimore Sun reported on July 13 ("National Harbor ad claims not supported by state analysis")
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
After months of contention, the Glendening administration reached an agreement with Maryland-area building trade unions yesterday on imposing pro-union work rules on the $2.2 billion Woodrow Wilson bridge replacement project. Contractor groups had opposed the administration's decision to negotiate what is known as a "project labor agreement," or PLA, for the job. Replacing the bridge across the Potomac River from Oxon Hill to Alexandria, Va., is one of the largest construction projects in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Pless B. Jones Sr | August 7, 2012
It seems you can't turn on the television or the radio this summer without hearing some voice extolling the virtues of bringing a sixth casino to Maryland - this one to be built inPrince George's County. And while there is an active public dialogue on the issue of expanded gaming, it is important for Marylanders to understand what is being promised and what may underlie the rhetoric. One particular element of the proponents' campaign deserves clarification - the jobs promised. As The Baltimore Sun reported on July 13 ("National Harbor ad claims not supported by state analysis")
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Marcia Myers and Michael Dresser and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
Defying opposition from Republicans and the state of Virginia, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has decided to work out a deal with organized labor to set work rules for the $2.2 billion project to replace the Woodrow Wilson Bridge. Glendening administration officials dismissed studies commissioned by nonunion contractors predicting that a so-called "project labor agreement," or PLA, would add $150 million to the cost of the bridge, which carries Interstate 495 across the Potomac River in suburban Washington.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
The two biggest bridge-building contractors in Maryland say they won't bid for work on the $2.2 billion Wilson Bridge replacement if the Glendening administration imposes pro-union work rules on the job. Officials of McLean Contracting, a Glen Burnie company with more than 300 workers, and Cianbro Corp., which employs about 400 people from its regional headquarters in Baltimore, say it would be costly and impractical for nonunion firms like theirs to operate under such rules. "It makes it impossible for us to bid that work," said Charles E. Hewett, a Cianbro vice president.
NEWS
By Vance T. Ayres | November 13, 2012
The case often argued against project labor agreements (PLAs) - that they are somehow exclusionary, allegedly favor union contractors and union workers, etc. - misses the mark. The true test of PLAs, which are single-site craft labor agreements used for large construction projects, should not focus on contractors or workers. The true worth and value of PLAs must be examined through the viewpoint of the project owner. After all, the owner is the one paying tens of millions of dollars (or hundreds of millions or even billions)
NEWS
November 29, 2000
A VERY expensive project just got even more expensive for Maryland taxpayers. That's because Gov. Parris N. Glendening will require union work rules for construction of a new Woodrow Wilson Bridge. The price tag on this twin-span replacement bridge over the Potomac River has already risen to $2.2 billion. Maryland could wind up paying all the added expenses of unionizing this massive construction project. Virginia's transportation secretary made that clear when she said her state "has no intention of paying ... for Maryland's decision to inflate labor costs."
NEWS
By Mark Ayers | January 30, 2012
There has been a lot said and written about a project labor agreement (PLA) being implemented for the proposed Maryland offshore wind energy project. When the time arrives for investments to be made in the construction of this critical project, there will be essentially two business models from which the state of Maryland can choose to place its scare resources. The first is a business model that is epitomized by the use of PLAs. PLAs are a market-based tool that offer increased job-site efficiencies, productivity, and on-time, on-budget results through a steady, local supply of the world's safest, most highly trained and productive skilled craft workforce - a workforce that has been developed through almost $1 billion a year in private investments in craft apprenticeship programs.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
After months of contention, the Glendening administration reached an agreement with Maryland-area building trade unions yesterday on imposing pro-union work rules on the $2.2 billion Woodrow Wilson bridge replacement project. Contractor groups had opposed the administration's decision to negotiate what is known as a "project labor agreement," or PLA, for the job. Replacing the bridge across the Potomac River from Oxon Hill to Alexandria, Va., is one of the largest construction projects in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Marcia Myers and Michael Dresser and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
Defying opposition from Republicans and the state of Virginia, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has decided to work out a deal with organized labor to set work rules for the $2.2 billion project to replace the Woodrow Wilson Bridge. Glendening administration officials dismissed studies commissioned by nonunion contractors predicting that a so-called "project labor agreement," or PLA, would add $150 million to the cost of the bridge, which carries Interstate 495 across the Potomac River in suburban Washington.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
The two biggest bridge-building contractors in Maryland say they won't bid for work on the $2.2 billion Wilson Bridge replacement if the Glendening administration imposes pro-union work rules on the job. Officials of McLean Contracting, a Glen Burnie company with more than 300 workers, and Cianbro Corp., which employs about 400 people from its regional headquarters in Baltimore, say it would be costly and impractical for nonunion firms like theirs to operate under such rules. "It makes it impossible for us to bid that work," said Charles E. Hewett, a Cianbro vice president.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2000
As the Glendening administration considers whether to impose pro-union work rules on one of the biggest construction projects in Maryland history, it is relying on the advice of a consultant known to advocate such requirements. The consulting firm, Parsons Corp. of Pasadena, Calif., will help the state decide contract terms for the $2 billion replacement of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge. Those terms could discourage many of Maryland's nonunion contractors from competing for the work.
NEWS
September 20, 2000
GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening could be jeopardizing a new Woodrow Wilson Bridge over the Potomac River by seeking pro-union work rules on this $2 billion project. The Glendening proposal has enflamed passions in Virginia, a right-to-work state that is splitting $400 million in bridge-replacement costs with Maryland. Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore III has criticized Mr. Glendening and warned that his state won't pay added expenses that could come with the work rules. There's a bigger concern, though.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
A federal court gave fresh momentum yesterday to Gov. Parris N. Glendening's fight for a "project labor agreement" requiring contractors to follow union work rules as they build the new Woodrow Wilson Bridge. The ruling, issued by U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan of the District of Columbia, overturned an executive order signed by President Bush this year prohibiting such agreements for federally funded projects across the country. Replacing the bridge, which carries Interstates 95 and 495 across the Potomac River between Oxon Hill and Alexandria, Va., is one of the largest construction projects in Maryland history and the state's No. 1 transportation priority.
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