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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 31, 1991
Tracy Punte wanted to go to Annapolis yesterday to tell Project Independence leaders about her problems with the program. But to get there, she needed to hike 1 miles, carrying her 5-month-old son, to reach the nearest bus stop in Glen Burnie.The same trouble with transportation has prevented the 19-year-old high school dropout from participating in Project Independence, Maryland's welfare-to-work training effort.As a teen mother, Punte belongs to one of the program's main target groups. Project Independence is required by federal law to spend 55 percent of its $19 million state budget on teen parents and long-term welfare recipients.
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NEWS
October 14, 1994
Good program needs to be kept goingCritics of "big" government, coming from various sides of the political spectrum, cite the inability or unwillingness of bureaucracies to live within their means as the major cause of swollen budgets and higher taxes.Because of that, perhaps my confusion as a new secretary of a large state agency can be understood, if not forgiven, when my )) first attempt to bring a program under fiscal control is blocked by a legislative committee and greeted by "shame on you" editorials in The Sun and The Evening Sun.The program in question is child care -- sometimes referred to as day care -- unquestionably one of the more crucial services provided by the Department of Human Resources.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Her husband had left her, she had two kids and no income and she dreaded the thought of welfare.But with no job skills and nowhere else to turn, Janet Brill stood in line at the Howard County Department of Social Services in Ellicott City, promising herself that welfare would not become a way of life for her family."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Her husband had left her, she had two kids and no income and she dreaded the thought of welfare.But with no job skills and nowhere else to turn, Janet Brill stood in line at the Howard County Department of Social Services in Ellicott City, promising herself that welfare would not become a way of life for her family."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
It all began, J. Randall Evans recalls, with the women who talked from behind their hands.Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, was touring the state to meet people in Project Independence, a job training program for welfare recipients.At a stop in Hagerstown, Evans noticed that the women he met held their hands to their mouths and seldom smiled. "After a while, I had to ask: Why are these people mumbling in their hands?" he said.The women told him they were embarrassed by their teeth, decayed and wrecked by neglect.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | November 21, 1991
Life began to change, Martha Caldwell said, when she received an "unwanted letter" from the Department of Social Services.A year ago, she was living in "a mouse-infested project in Cherry Hill," taking welfare payments, caring for her four children and three grandchildren.But the letter told her she had been selected to enroll in Project Independence, the federally mandated, state-run program meant to guidewelfare recipients off the dole and into jobs and self-sufficiency. She was not interested, she recalled, and resented being told what to do. But she was aware that failure to join the program meant a cut in her monthly check.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | October 31, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Paying the rent will be easier for 28 more Westminster families who will get federal housing subsidies now that the city has obtained more money from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).The subsidies amount to an estimated $882,240 over the next five years and will help two groups of people: those now in emergency shelters for the homeless, and those participating in Project Independence, a program designed to give welfare recipients job training and education.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1994
Beyond the rhetoric, the red tape, the government acronyms and the public debate over welfare are people like Debbie Force.Four generations of her family have been or are on welfare.Ms. Force, her mother and her grandmother have been on the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program, the public subsidy that accounts for about 70 percent of welfare payments nationally. Two of her daughters now receive AFDC.Ms. Force, 38, is no longer receiving welfare. In fact, she's making $20,000 a year plus benefits, and she's earning it."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | April 23, 1992
A study of California's effort to put welfare recipients to work says it resulted in lower welfare payments and higher earnings for the people enrolled in the program -- a finding that bodes well for similar job-training strategies in Maryland and other states.The study, which is scheduled for release today, is being hailed as an initial report card on the 1988 national welfare reforms approved by Congress.The federal Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training program provides up to $1 billion a year to states with programs designed to get people off welfare and into the work force.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 27, 1991
LaVerne Wright knows just how addictive soap operas can be. During the seven years she was on welfare, she spent most afternoons glued to the television for her daily fix.Six months ago, the 25-year-old mother of three quit cold turkey. Now, instead of spending her days following "The Young and the Restless," she is busy working as a secretary at the Department of Housing and Community Development in Annapolis."I felt it was time for me to get off my butt," Wright said. "I wanted to make something positive out of myself.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1994
Beyond the rhetoric, the red tape, the government acronyms and the public debate over welfare are people like Debbie Force.Four generations of her family have been or are on welfare.Ms. Force, her mother and her grandmother have been on the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program, the public subsidy that accounts for about 70 percent of welfare payments nationally. Two of her daughters now receive AFDC.Ms. Force, 38, is no longer receiving welfare. In fact, she's making $20,000 a year plus benefits, and she's earning it."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Wendy Miller's first concern was that, if publicized, her success in the state's welfare-to-work program might come across as a sob story splashed all over the newspaper.But the Manchester resident, one of seven people recognized at last week's Governor's Workforce Investment Board annual awards luncheon for her performance in Maryland's Project Independence program, also wanted to tell others that they can succeed.Project Independence is a job training and placement program coordinated with Social Services for people who receive federal Aid to Families with Dependent Children.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | April 23, 1992
A study of California's effort to put welfare recipients to work says it resulted in lower welfare payments and higher earnings for the people enrolled in the program -- a finding that bodes well for similar job-training strategies in Maryland and other states.The study, which is scheduled for release today, is being hailed as an initial report card on the 1988 national welfare reforms approved by Congress.The federal Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training program provides up to $1 billion a year to states with programs designed to get people off welfare and into the work force.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
Program SuccessEditor: Your Jan. 5 article about the Pratt Library failed to mention that the literacy class Margaret Brown attended at the Broadway branch was operated by the city's Office of Employment Development as part of Project Independence.Project Independence is a state program that helps AFDC recipients gain the skills needed to achieve self-sufficiency through employment. It serves approximately 1,700 city residents a year in literacy programs. Most of them take part in employment training programs once they have gained the basic literacy and computational skills needed to be successful.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | November 21, 1991
Life began to change, Martha Caldwell said, when she received an "unwanted letter" from the Department of Social Services.A year ago, she was living in "a mouse-infested project in Cherry Hill," taking welfare payments, caring for her four children and three grandchildren.But the letter told her she had been selected to enroll in Project Independence, the federally mandated, state-run program meant to guidewelfare recipients off the dole and into jobs and self-sufficiency. She was not interested, she recalled, and resented being told what to do. But she was aware that failure to join the program meant a cut in her monthly check.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
It all began, J. Randall Evans recalls, with the women who talked from behind their hands.Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, was touring the state to meet people in Project Independence, a job training program for welfare recipients.At a stop in Hagerstown, Evans noticed that the women he met held their hands to their mouths and seldom smiled. "After a while, I had to ask: Why are these people mumbling in their hands?" he said.The women told him they were embarrassed by their teeth, decayed and wrecked by neglect.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 14, 1993
Wendy Miller's first concern was that, if publicized, her success in the state's welfare-to-work program might come across as a sob story splashed all over the newspaper.But the Manchester resident, one of seven people recognized at last week's Governor's Workforce Investment Board annual awards luncheon for her performance in Maryland's Project Independence program, also wanted to tell others that they can succeed.Project Independence is a job training and placement program coordinated with Social Services for people who receive federal Aid to Families with Dependent Children.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
Program SuccessEditor: Your Jan. 5 article about the Pratt Library failed to mention that the literacy class Margaret Brown attended at the Broadway branch was operated by the city's Office of Employment Development as part of Project Independence.Project Independence is a state program that helps AFDC recipients gain the skills needed to achieve self-sufficiency through employment. It serves approximately 1,700 city residents a year in literacy programs. Most of them take part in employment training programs once they have gained the basic literacy and computational skills needed to be successful.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | April 9, 1991
Rose Fletcher was sure that her new job as a maid at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel would be her first step toward getting off welfare forever.It might take a few months, she thought, but by the end of 1990 she expected to be self-reliant -- no more monthly welfare checks, no more food stamps, no more Medicaid.And maybe even a chance to move out of the George B. Murphy Homes public housing complex in West Baltimore.For a while, all seemed to be going as planned.The busy summer tourist season at the Sheraton meant that Rose often worked six days a week, earning overtime on top of her $5.80 per hour regular pay. In a few months, her own $234-a-week paychecks replaced her $477 monthly welfare checks.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 31, 1991
Tracy Punte wanted to go to Annapolis yesterday to tell Project Independence leaders about her problems with the program. But to get there, she needed to hike 1 miles, carrying her 5-month-old son, to reach the nearest bus stop in Glen Burnie.The same trouble with transportation has prevented the 19-year-old high school dropout from participating in Project Independence, Maryland's welfare-to-work training effort.As a teen mother, Punte belongs to one of the program's main target groups. Project Independence is required by federal law to spend 55 percent of its $19 million state budget on teen parents and long-term welfare recipients.
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