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NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
When Frederick L. Jennings' therapist told him there was a place in the city where he could hang out with other people who also suffered from mental illnesses and were homeless, he thought she was the one who needed therapy. "I couldn't believe such a place existed," Jennings said. It has been nearly a year since his initial referral to Project HOPE, the city's only daytime drop-in center for homeless men and women. For the first time in his life, the 59-year-old artist says he feels connected to a community that understands him. "Every caseworker here is a person you can talk to," said Jennings, who has bipolar disorder.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 26, 2011
Helen R. Walsh, a registered nurse who helped her physician husband establish Project HOPE in the 1950s, which brought health care to developing countries and offered disaster relief, died Thursday from congestive heart failure at her Bethesda home. She was 89. "Helen and Bill Walsh were larger-than-life figures who convinced President [Dwight] Eisenhower to give Project HOPE a ship that became an icon of America's humanity," Dr. John Howe, Project HOPE's current president and CEO, said Tuesday.
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NEWS
December 29, 1996
Dr. William B. Walsh, 76, founded, led Project HOPEDr. William B. Walsh, who founded and led Project HOPE, a nonprofit program that provides medical training, health education and humanitarian assistance around the world, died Friday of prostate cancer at his home in Bethesda. He was 76 and also lived in Tucson, Ariz.Since it was founded in 1958, Project HOPE (Health Opportunities for People Everywhere) has worked in more than 70 countries on five continents, including North America. More than 5,000 health professionals have donated services to the project, and it has trained more than 1.3 million health workers and provided aid to millions of people, project officials said.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | May 31, 2007
Avant-garde for all ages will be the watchword for the Theatre Project's 36th season. "It is a season that is very much intended to expose audiences to a wide variety of new work -- some highly accessible, such as Squonk Opera's Baltimore: The Opera; some far more cutting-edge, such as a largely nonverbal Bulgarian piece," said producing director Anne Cantler Fulwiler. Changes include more student matinees and restructured ticket pricing (general admission will go up $4, but student prices will be reduced $1)
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
A third of emergency room visits in Maryland are for health problems that didn't need immediate treatment or could have been dealt with in a doctor's office, according to a study presented yesterday to the Maryland Health Care Commission. "Most likely, they did not require an emergency department visit for appropriate care," said Penny Mohr, a senior research director of the Project Hope Center for Health Affairs and one of the authors of the report. The study is a follow-up to a task force report, released last year, which found emergency room visits in Maryland approaching 2 million a year - up 31 percent from 1990.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
The popcorn bowl was making the rounds and the air was filled with giggles as a question-and-answer party game hit full swing.Then someone blew up a condom like a balloon.But this was a party with serious overtones. The man and three women seated comfortably in this Towson apartment's small living room had gathered to participate in an HIV-AIDS outreach program run by Baltimore County's Office of Substance Abuse.Called Project Hope, the effort to deliver information about HIV -- thehuman immunodeficiency virus -- to black women began last year and by next month will have reached nearly 550 people.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
In the officer's barber shop aboard the USS Sanctuary, the shelves are stocked with combs and creams. A recent issue of Newsweek hangs on the magazine rack, ready for the next customer.They are somewhat wistful symbols of the optimism the Sanctuary's new owners hold about their efforts to return the rusty, naval hospital ship to active, humanitarian duty.The work will not be easy: the 46-year-old vessel has not sailed under its own power for 13 years, and putting it back into ship-shape will cost more than $10 million, not to mention a similar amount every year in operating costs.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | March 1, 1991
The controversial domed stadium and convention center project in downtown St. Louis got back on track in the Missouri legislature yesterday, boosting that city's hopes in the National Football League's expansion derby.By a voice vote, the House budget committee in the Missouri legislature approved the funding for the project. The overall budget bill, which included the project, was then approved by an 18-7 vote by the committee.Supporters of the project now are predicting that the project will be passed by the entire legislature.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | May 9, 1993
Move over, Ross Perot -- some Baltimore fifth-graders are now ready to start the climb from the lemonade stand to the board room.Yesterday, 145 city and county students attended the area's first seminar by Project H.O.P.E., a Wichita, Kan.,-based program that uses the concept of "entrepreneurship" to reinforce the importance of education.The concept is new, says Project H.O.P.E.'s founder, Fran Jabara, not only in grade schools, but in the country's business schools."Up until 15 years ago, we never talked about entrepreneurship.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
At 1 month old, Justin Marino may be the youngest library card holder in Carroll County.Yesterday, Justin and his mother, Jessica, were the first recipients of a "Books for Babies" reading packet at the Carroll County Health Department.Visibly unimpressed, Justin slept through the entire ceremony.Sponsored by the Carroll County Public Library, the Woman's Club of Westminster and The Sun in Carroll County, the "Books for Babies" project is intended to encourage parents to help their children become readers as early as possible.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
When Frederick L. Jennings' therapist told him there was a place in the city where he could hang out with other people who also suffered from mental illnesses and were homeless, he thought she was the one who needed therapy. "I couldn't believe such a place existed," Jennings said. It has been nearly a year since his initial referral to Project HOPE, the city's only daytime drop-in center for homeless men and women. For the first time in his life, the 59-year-old artist says he feels connected to a community that understands him. "Every caseworker here is a person you can talk to," said Jennings, who has bipolar disorder.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | March 20, 2005
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Three George Washington players and their coach, Karl Hobbs, all sat before the cameras Friday night and expressed virtually the same emotions about falling to Georgia Tech in the school's first trip to the NCAA tournament in six years. "I'm feeling a little overjoyed, and yet disappointed," said senior point guard T.J. Thompson. Conflicting as those feelings are, it's safe to say Thompson and the rest of the Colonials wouldn't trade them for what a bunch of teams between D.C. and the northern border of Maryland are feeling.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2003
A third of emergency room visits in Maryland are for health problems that didn't need immediate treatment or could have been dealt with in a doctor's office, according to a study presented yesterday to the Maryland Health Care Commission. "Most likely, they did not require an emergency department visit for appropriate care," said Penny Mohr, a senior research director of the Project Hope Center for Health Affairs and one of the authors of the report. The study is a follow-up to a task force report, released last year, which found emergency room visits in Maryland approaching 2 million a year - up 31 percent from 1990.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A long-awaited memorial for Baltimore police officers killed in the line of duty could come one step closer to reality tomorrow, when backers hope to raise about $50,000 at a bull roast. Friends of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Memorial Fund Inc. hopes to attract about 1,500 people to the event, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Martin's West, 6817 Dogwood Road. Profits will be given to the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Memorial Fund Inc. Trustees of the fund have said they need about $500,000 more to complete the nearly $1 million memorial, which would be built next to the Shot Tower.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
Plans for turning the hulking Montgomery Ward building in Southwest Baltimore into new office space have mushroomed to surrounding properties, raising hopes that the huge project will rejuvenate a depressed area of town. After initially announcing their plans for the 28-acre Ward site, Sam Himmelrich Jr. and David F. Tufaro quietly acquired by lease or purchase about 30 more acres, some with buildings. Now, in addition to turning the former catalog house into the largest office space in Baltimore, the developers might add restaurants, a big store such as a Target or Home Depot, and an extended-stay hotel.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Maria E. Johnson's new home will cost $60 million, and her bank is comfortable with that. Johnson plans to move into Centerpoint, an apartment complex being developed by Bank of America in old commercial buildings that constitute a block in downtown Baltimore's West Side. Her enthusiasm for the project is so strong that Johnson, a developer for the bank, decided to also be the first tenant. Centerpoint is one of about a dozen apartment projects planned in the central business district, fueling hopes that Baltimore can lure people back to the city.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A long-awaited memorial for Baltimore police officers killed in the line of duty could come one step closer to reality tomorrow, when backers hope to raise about $50,000 at a bull roast. Friends of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Memorial Fund Inc. hopes to attract about 1,500 people to the event, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Martin's West, 6817 Dogwood Road. Profits will be given to the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Memorial Fund Inc. Trustees of the fund have said they need about $500,000 more to complete the nearly $1 million memorial, which would be built next to the Shot Tower.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun theater critic | May 31, 2007
Avant-garde for all ages will be the watchword for the Theatre Project's 36th season. "It is a season that is very much intended to expose audiences to a wide variety of new work -- some highly accessible, such as Squonk Opera's Baltimore: The Opera; some far more cutting-edge, such as a largely nonverbal Bulgarian piece," said producing director Anne Cantler Fulwiler. Changes include more student matinees and restructured ticket pricing (general admission will go up $4, but student prices will be reduced $1)
NEWS
By Kurt Shillinger and Kurt Shillinger,BOSTON GLOBE | March 31, 2001
MASSAWA, Eritrea - Imagine a farm where water is never in short supply and each crop leaves the soil more fertile. Now imagine that farm offering a solution to the most vexing environmental issues of our times: global warming, declining water tables, loss of arable land, collapsing fisheries, and shrinking biodiversity. Finally, imagine that farm making money - real wealth, not just enough to pay the bills. After more than 30 years of research, Carl Hodges, an atmospheric physicist from the University of Arizona, no longer imagines such a farm.
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