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NEWS
April 2, 2003
BECAUSE THE General Assembly and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. have rejected significant tax increases, valuable programs will undergo deep budget cuts this year. Among the targets: children's health insurance, higher education and mental health - all worthy of preserving at the current level of support. Even more damage can be avoided if the Assembly addresses a variety of issues still pending in one or both houses. They range from charter schools to historic preservation tax credits to gun violence.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
To Mozetta Smith, the mug shot on the orange flier that police handed out looked familiar. Still, after scouring her memory, Smith could not quite remember where she had seen convicted felon Collin Hawkins - but for sure, she was pleased he was off the street. Hawkins, 26, is a drug dealer and carjacker who was acquitted last month in the attempted murder of an off-duty city police officer. But Hawkins was also sentenced recently to 30 years in federal prison for a handgun violation - a conviction local and federal authorities held up as a success story in a two-year-old partnership.
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NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - President Bush announced yesterday that he plans to expand to all 50 states an anti-gun initiative that places more gun crimes under federal jurisdiction, meaning tougher sentences for offenders but also the potential for more crowded caseloads in the federal courts. "Those who commit crimes with guns will find a determined adversary in my administration," Bush declared in an address to several dozen uniformed police officers in Philadelphia. For his first major presidential speech on crime, Bush promoted a policy that is heavy on tougher enforcement measures and enjoys wide support.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
If the current trend continues through the end of the year, federal authorities in Baltimore believe that they will prosecute at least one-third more gun cases than they did last year in the city. The projected increase comes from an analysis of the first four months of Baltimore's new Project Exile program, which shows additional state gun cases as well. Under the program, federal prosecutors have agreed to take more gun cases in the city and use the threat of federal indictment to cajole other defendants into pleading guilty in state court.
NEWS
October 29, 1999
IF Baltimore's next mayor wants to crack down on inner-city crime -- and both candidates say that's a top priority -- he might look to replicate a program started by U.S. Attorney Lynn A. Battaglia that seeks long prison terms for gun violators. Ms. Battaglia's efforts led this week to the conviction and sentencing of two Baltimore thugs on gun-carrying offenses. Each man faces at least 15 years behind bars -- with no parole. Under federal law, just carrying a gun lands felons in prison for a long time.
NEWS
February 13, 2000
Project Exile is a gun-control strategy that attacks the demand for guns. Its unlike gun-control proposals which seek to reduce the massive supply of weapons on urban and suburban streets. If Project Exile becomes Maryland law, two Anne Arundel County legislators from District 31 will be able to take much of the credit. Del. Joan Cadden and Sen. Philip C. Jimeno, Democrats who represent northeastern Arundel, are chief sponsors of Marylands Project Exile legislation in their respective chambers.
NEWS
By Bob Kemper and Bob Kemper,Chicago Tribune | April 16, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- The fact that the drug dealer was packing a gun along with his 10 ounces of crack cocaine the night police stopped him on the streets of this historic city was no surprise to Lt. Michael J. Shamus. What struck him were the first words out of the dealer's mouth. "He shouted, 'Hey, all the dope is mine! The dope is mine!' " Shamus recalled, laughing at the memory. "Then he said, 'But that gun, that gun's not mine.'" Richmond police have dozens of such stories they tell of street toughs willing to say or do anything these days -- even volunteering their guilt for drug dealing -- to avoid being charged with carrying an illegal gun. Dope means doing time.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | June 6, 2008
To Mozetta Smith, the mug shot on the orange flier that police handed out looked familiar. Still, after scouring her memory, Smith could not quite remember where she had seen convicted felon Collin Hawkins - but for sure, she was pleased he was off the street. Hawkins, 26, is a drug dealer and carjacker who was acquitted last month in the attempted murder of an off-duty city police officer. But Hawkins was also sentenced recently to 30 years in federal prison for a handgun violation - a conviction local and federal authorities held up as a success story in a two-year-old partnership.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
If the current trend continues through the end of the year, federal authorities in Baltimore believe that they will prosecute at least one-third more gun cases than they did last year in the city. The projected increase comes from an analysis of the first four months of Baltimore's new Project Exile program, which shows additional state gun cases as well. Under the program, federal prosecutors have agreed to take more gun cases in the city and use the threat of federal indictment to cajole other defendants into pleading guilty in state court.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
MARYLAND judges seem unwilling or unable to grasp this reality: a gun in the hands of a criminal is a murder or armed robbery waiting to happen. When judges fail to use the sanctions available to them, they are licensing a murderous traffic that rends the fabric of a community. Taxpayers flee toward safety in the suburbs. With weapons at hand, young men kill each other -- and bystanders -- to acquire money, maintain respect or to protect turf. Even when guns are used in the commission of brutal crimes, a recent article by The Sun's Caitlin Francke shows, some judges shy away from a Maryland law that requires a five-year, no-parole sentence.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
BECAUSE THE General Assembly and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. have rejected significant tax increases, valuable programs will undergo deep budget cuts this year. Among the targets: children's health insurance, higher education and mental health - all worthy of preserving at the current level of support. Even more damage can be avoided if the Assembly addresses a variety of issues still pending in one or both houses. They range from charter schools to historic preservation tax credits to gun violence.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
The General Assembly appears headed toward rejecting all major firearms-related legislation this year, despite calls throughout the 2002 gubernatorial campaign and sniper crisis for tougher measures to combat gun crime. One of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s priorities, Project Exile - a program to toughen punishment for gun-related crimes - is among the legislation likely to fail this year because an influential committee chairman says he won't let it be considered unless it's attached to stricter gun control measures.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio has agreed to launch a Virginia-style Project Exile gun prosecution program in Baltimore and Prince George's County, helping fulfill a key campaign promise made by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. After resisting such a move for a year, DiBiagio informed the state's attorneys in two jurisdictions by letter this month that Project Exile would now be implemented in Maryland. Praised in Virginia for removing criminals from the streets, the program targets gun-possession cases.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Vowing to go after "gun bangers," Republican gubernatorial candidate Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.pledged yesterday to strictly enforce the state's gun laws and work with federal prosecutors to ensure that felons who carry guns go to prison for at least five years with no chance for parole. "When I am elected governor, the word goes out to criminals," Ehrlich said while standing on the steps of the Eastern District police headquarters in Baltimore surrounded by police and state's attorneys. "Modify your behavior, don't carry a gun on the street because the rules have changed in Baltimore and in the state."
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - President Bush announced yesterday that he plans to expand to all 50 states an anti-gun initiative that places more gun crimes under federal jurisdiction, meaning tougher sentences for offenders but also the potential for more crowded caseloads in the federal courts. "Those who commit crimes with guns will find a determined adversary in my administration," Bush declared in an address to several dozen uniformed police officers in Philadelphia. For his first major presidential speech on crime, Bush promoted a policy that is heavy on tougher enforcement measures and enjoys wide support.
NEWS
By Bob Kemper and Bob Kemper,Chicago Tribune | April 16, 2000
RICHMOND, Va. -- The fact that the drug dealer was packing a gun along with his 10 ounces of crack cocaine the night police stopped him on the streets of this historic city was no surprise to Lt. Michael J. Shamus. What struck him were the first words out of the dealer's mouth. "He shouted, 'Hey, all the dope is mine! The dope is mine!' " Shamus recalled, laughing at the memory. "Then he said, 'But that gun, that gun's not mine.'" Richmond police have dozens of such stories they tell of street toughs willing to say or do anything these days -- even volunteering their guilt for drug dealing -- to avoid being charged with carrying an illegal gun. Dope means doing time.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
The General Assembly appears headed toward rejecting all major firearms-related legislation this year, despite calls throughout the 2002 gubernatorial campaign and sniper crisis for tougher measures to combat gun crime. One of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s priorities, Project Exile - a program to toughen punishment for gun-related crimes - is among the legislation likely to fail this year because an influential committee chairman says he won't let it be considered unless it's attached to stricter gun control measures.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2003
U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio has agreed to launch a Virginia-style Project Exile gun prosecution program in Baltimore and Prince George's County, helping fulfill a key campaign promise made by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. After resisting such a move for a year, DiBiagio informed the state's attorneys in two jurisdictions by letter this month that Project Exile would now be implemented in Maryland. Praised in Virginia for removing criminals from the streets, the program targets gun-possession cases.
NEWS
February 13, 2000
Project Exile is a gun-control strategy that attacks the demand for guns. Its unlike gun-control proposals which seek to reduce the massive supply of weapons on urban and suburban streets. If Project Exile becomes Maryland law, two Anne Arundel County legislators from District 31 will be able to take much of the credit. Del. Joan Cadden and Sen. Philip C. Jimeno, Democrats who represent northeastern Arundel, are chief sponsors of Marylands Project Exile legislation in their respective chambers.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
MARYLAND judges seem unwilling or unable to grasp this reality: a gun in the hands of a criminal is a murder or armed robbery waiting to happen. When judges fail to use the sanctions available to them, they are licensing a murderous traffic that rends the fabric of a community. Taxpayers flee toward safety in the suburbs. With weapons at hand, young men kill each other -- and bystanders -- to acquire money, maintain respect or to protect turf. Even when guns are used in the commission of brutal crimes, a recent article by The Sun's Caitlin Francke shows, some judges shy away from a Maryland law that requires a five-year, no-parole sentence.
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