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By Staff Report | December 29, 1992
Charles Frederick Millard, who worked as a project engineer for Whitman Requardt and Associates, died Dec. 20 of cardiac arrest at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 75.Born in Dunmore, Pa., in 1917, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Bucknell University in 1940.During World War II, he served with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the European and Asian theaters. After the war, he worked for the Corps of Engineers, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District in Oakland, Calif.
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FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Take 10 is a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. Having - and sharing - adventures is the main theme in the life of Jim Seay, the 53-year-old president and owner of Premier Rides, a Baltimore-based company that makes theme park rides. The items he treasures most reflect that, whether it's one of his many past Super Bowl tickets or the photo commemorating the time he spent floating in zero gravity with famed physicist Stephen Hawking.
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EXPLORE
February 14, 2012
Bob and Maureen Huether, of Stoneleigh, announce the engagement of their daughter, Maggie Huether, to Chuck Anton, son of Tom and Judy Anton, of Westminster. The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, and graduated from Loyola University with a bachelor's degree in marketing in 2005. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in education at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. She is a teacher and coach at Notre Dame Preparatory School. The prospective groom is a 2000 graduate of Francis Scott Key High School, and graduated from Bridgewater College with a bachelor's degree in business management, in 2005.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
EDITOR'S NOTE: What follows is a text-only version of this Hidden Maryland story. To view the full feature version, which includes photos, video and graphics, go here .  Once you've passed through a vestibule, an air shower, a changing room and three more doors separating the grime of life from the "clean room" where NASA is building the James Webb Space Telescope, a gust of 72-degree filtered air greets your face. That's the only exposed skin allowed inside. To prepare for the room, shoe-covering booties and a hair net go on first.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
The apparent low bid for the first phase of the Carroll County airport expansion project came in about 35 percent below the engineer's estimate when bids were opened yesterday.The bid was about $3 million less than the estimated $8.74 million projected cost."We got some beautiful prices," said J. Michael Evans, the county general services director. "There's some good bargains here, it looks like."The bids were for the first phase of the airport expansion project, which includes lengthening a runway from 3,200 feet to 5,100 feet and the relocation of Meadow Branch Road.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
William S. Aiken Jr., former NASA director of aeronautics who earlier in his career had worked on the X-1, the first supersonic aircraft, died May 27 of a blood disorder at St. Agnes Hospital. The Charlestown retirement community resident was 90. The son of a gas company executive and a homemaker, Mr. Aiken was born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J. He was a 1938 graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., in 1942.
NEWS
June 4, 1991
Warren N. Wills, a civil engineer who worked on large construction projects, died Saturday at the Anne Arundel Medical Center of complications from a stroke. He was 83 and had a home in Riviera Beach from his childhood.Services for Mr. Wills will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the McCully Funeral Home, 3204 Mountain Road in Pasadena.He retired about 10 years ago after working as a project engineer for various contractors.From the late 1950s through the 1960s, he served as an estimator on space projects for the Martin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 1, 2011
William E. Wentworth, a retired W.R. Grace project engineer who survived the sinking of a Liberty Ship in a World War II kamikaze attack, died of cancer Jan. 22 at his Timonium home. He was 87. Born in Detroit, he moved with his parents to Carroll County and was a 1940 graduate of Hampstead High School. He later resided on Belleville Avenue and became an apprentice machinist with the old Bartlett-Hayward Co. in Southwest Baltimore before World War II. In an autobiographical sketch, Mr. Wentworth wrote that he joined the Navy as a machinist.
NEWS
August 31, 2003
Marshal McCord, an engineer on several major civil projects who served as the state's chief of engineering and construction, died Thursday of Parkinson's disease at the Gilchrest Center for Hospice Care in Towson. A resident of the Glen Meadows Retirement Community in Glen Arm, he was 86. Mr. McCord grew up in the Pimlico area of Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute. He went on to earn a degree in civil engineering at the Johns Hopkins University, where he was a member of ROTC.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 24, 2013
Another segment of Wheel Road near Bel Air is scheduled to be closed to through traffic this week, as the final phase begins on the major reconstruction of the road that links several communities south and east of the county seat. The Harford County Department of Public Works said it will begin Phase 2B of the Wheel Road Improvements Project on or around this Wednesday, June 26. The affected portion of Wheel Road is the segment between Cedar Lane and Glenangus Drive. The county posted signs along the road last week that state the closure was to begin Monday, although a later media advisory stated the start date for the work would be Wednesday.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 24, 2013
Another segment of Wheel Road near Bel Air is scheduled to be closed to through traffic this week, as the final phase begins on the major reconstruction of the road that links several communities south and east of the county seat. The Harford County Department of Public Works said it will begin Phase 2B of the Wheel Road Improvements Project on or around this Wednesday, June 26. The affected portion of Wheel Road is the segment between Cedar Lane and Glenangus Drive. The county posted signs along the road last week that state the closure was to begin Monday, although a later media advisory stated the start date for the work would be Wednesday.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
As traffic whizzed by on West Street, Nancy Patterson and her service dog, Mahler, rolled smoothly past homes and car dealerships until a utility pole jutted from the center of the brand-new sidewalk. Patterson negotiated her wheelchair around the pole, wincing as she got close to the road, and kept rolling, too excited to pay the obstacle much mind. "I haven't been able to walk on West Street, ever, before today," Patterson said. "It's a huge freedom for people with disabilities.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Over the last two weekends of October, highway crews will replace two bridges over the Baltimore-Washington Parkway that serve the airport and hotel district by rolling the old ones out and rolling the new ones in. The "bridge on wheels" swap, used in other states but making its debut in Maryland, saves time and money, reduces traffic disruptions and cuts the potential for work-zone accidents, State Highway Administration officials said. "We looked at traditional methods and with the traffic level there, closing the bridges wasn't an option for an extended period," said Jeff Robert, a state project engineer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
Robert M. Stock, a retired electrical engineer and FBI fingerprint pioneer whose work led to the establishment of the Automated Fingerprint Identification System, died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at his Severna Park home. He was 83. The son of a restaurant purveyor and a homemaker, he was born and raised in Syracuse, N.Y., where he graduated from Eastwood High School in 1946. He served in the Army Signal Corps from 1946 to 1949, and then enrolled at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., in a five-year program that allowed him to earn both his bachelor's and master's degrees in 1954 in electrical engineering.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | March 13, 2012
Reaching the 100-year mark is obviously a milestone in and of itself. But not everyone is feted with the sort of grand, two-day celebration that marked the centennial of Lutherville resident and retiredU.S. Army Corps of EngineersCol. Erland Tillman. Not only was Tillman joined by family members from as far away as Sweden and Norway; he was also presented with a medal from the Minister of Defense of the Czech Republic for his role as commander of the U.S. Army 322nd Engineer Battalion of the 97th Infantry Division during the liberation of Czechoslovakia in the final months of World War II. At a celebration last month at the Brightwood Retirement Community, Tillman also received kudos from theU.S.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
When it opens next year, the Great Mall of China near Beijing will be the biggest retail and entertainment center in the world, with 15 million square feet of shops, a theme park, a water park — and the world's tallest indoor roller coaster, imported from Baltimore. The still-unnamed "super launch" coaster will be designed and built by Premier Rides, a company that specializes in roller coasters, water rides and other amusement park attractions. The mall's developer, the Berjaya Great Mall of China Co. Ltd., commissioned Premier to work on the project earlier this year after meeting the firm's president, Jim Seay, last June during a Maryland trade mission to China.
EXPLORE
February 14, 2012
Bob and Maureen Huether, of Stoneleigh, announce the engagement of their daughter, Maggie Huether, to Chuck Anton, son of Tom and Judy Anton, of Westminster. The bride-to-be is a 2001 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School, and graduated from Loyola University with a bachelor's degree in marketing in 2005. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in education at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. She is a teacher and coach at Notre Dame Preparatory School. The prospective groom is a 2000 graduate of Francis Scott Key High School, and graduated from Bridgewater College with a bachelor's degree in business management, in 2005.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
William S. Aiken Jr., former NASA director of aeronautics who earlier in his career had worked on the X-1, the first supersonic aircraft, died May 27 of a blood disorder at St. Agnes Hospital. The Charlestown retirement community resident was 90. The son of a gas company executive and a homemaker, Mr. Aiken was born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J. He was a 1938 graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., in 1942.
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