Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProhibition
IN THE NEWS

Prohibition

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 4, 2014
Rep. Andy Harris offered up the prohibitionist's minority point of view regarding marijuana ( "Marijuana decriminalization: up in smoke," April 1). Fact is, if he represents his constituents, he will support ending cannabis prohibition immediately since the majority of Americans no long support it or want to pay for it. Cannabis prohibition has been one of America's worst policy failures in history, dependent on lies, half-truths and propaganda which are being exposed like never before.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The Baltimore County school board gave Superintendent Dallas Dance a $5,000 a year pay increase this week, part of several changes to his four-year employment contract. The increase raises his annual salary to $265,000. School officials said the percentage increase was equivalent to the 1.9 percent average increase teachers will get, in addition to a 3 percent bonus. The contract also will be amended so that Dance will not be allowed to take any outside consulting jobs. The board's ethics panel found him in violation of its rules in taking a part-time job with a professional development company last year.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 11, 2011
In response to Kevin A. Sabet's recent opinion piece ("Drug legalization: Wrong lesson of Prohibition," Oct. 9), I don't know which is more abhorrent - that a Baltimore newspaper would run an op-ed championing Prohibition as "not as bad as you remember" or that the piece was penned by a former senior adviser in the White HouseOffice of National Drug Control Policy. A city that gave birth to the fictional place known as Hampsterdam, and all the benefits it provided, ought to know better.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
I'm not a cigarette smoker, although I did try to get myself addicted when I was a kid. I smoked Camel no filters for a year but I never liked them. They stank, they tasted bad and the "high" was terrible - if you can call wanting to throw up a "high. " I eventually gave them up out of disgust, and I still can't stand the smell. In fact, I can't think of anything good to say about tobacco at all. But having said all that, I still have to stand up for the rights of smokers to kill themselves if they want to. When I read in your paper that some employers will not hire smokers, that's going way to far ( "In Maryland, smoking could cost you job," July 5)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 30, 2010
There was one mistake Baltimore never made. Baltimore, and the state of Maryland, never endorsed Prohibition. We were known as the wettest state, where beer and liquor was freely available before and after the Volstead Act's repeal in 1933. Our resistance to Prohibition was in complete violation of a constitutional amendment and federal ordinance. Like many born in the 1950s, my view of Prohibition was shaped by the television series of that era, "The Untouchables," with actor Robert Stack as agent Eliot Ness.
NEWS
By Betty Buck | December 4, 2013
Every day, Maryland beer distributors safely and efficiently deliver thousands of labels of beer to local retail stores, restaurants and bars for Marylanders to purchase and enjoy - from the Baltimore Harbor to the Eastern Shore to the Washington Metropolitan Area. But the success of our local businesses today results from lessons learned years ago when this nation banned alcohol, drove it underground and released a torrent of unintended consequences. On Thursday, while many prepare for holiday festivities, we celebrate another milestone in our country's history: the 80th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
It was March 30, 1923, and Carroll County, like the rest of the nation, was in the depths of Prohibition. Prohibition, known as the Volstead Act, did not go into effect throughout the nation until Jan. 20, 1920. But Carroll Countians had voted to outlaw the sale of alcohol in the county six years earlier, in 1914, according to research by historian Jay Graybeal for the Historical Society of Carroll County. Prohibition remained the law of the land until the passage of the 21st Amendment on Dec. 5, 1933.
NEWS
June 4, 1991
Opponents of legal abortion claim they are within easy reach of the necessary 33,373 petition signatures to place Maryland's new abortion law before the voters in 1992. That's good, because there is every reason to be confident that Maryland voters, speaking en masse, will ratify the measure already approved by their elected representatives in the General Assembly this year.But by the time the referendum takes place, the abortion issue could well be on its way to resolution -- not by laws or great moral debates or even by popular votes, but rather by women exercising free choice in determining whether to bear a child.
NEWS
By FROMA HARROP | August 27, 1995
Providence, Rhode Island. -- Hatchets in hand, Carry Nation and her anti-booze associates smashed bar stools, mirrors, whiskey bottles and plate-glass windows as they stormed through America's saloons nearly a century ago. They were stopped.A constitutional amendment in 1919 prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages. In 1933, it was overturned.Despite these setbacks, the Temperance movement lives on. Today's means of attack are more refined than Carry Nation's ''hatchetations'' or Prohibition's outright ban. Modern prohibitionists assail alcohol with excise taxes, advertising restrictions, litigation and moral censure of social drinking.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers/Solis-Cohen Enterprises | June 13, 1993
Q: Years ago a friend gave me an unopened bottle of "Old Mock Whiskey" made in 1916 according to its still-intact federal tax stamp. It was bottled in 1933 during Prohibition. Both its bright green and red box and tax stamp are clearly marked "Medicinal Use Only," the only way to legally acquire whiskey during Prohibition. Who might want it and how much is it worth?A: It's unusual to find an unopened Prohibition-era whiskey bottle with its box in such good condition. But you might not be able to sell it in some states without a liquor license.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
The consumption of alcohol at this year's Baltimore Pride festivities will be confined to two designated beer gardens within the larger event footprint, organizers said Thursday. "City officials are trying to crack down on alcohol consumption," said Kelly Neel, executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore, or GLCCB, which organizes the events. "They told us we had to fence in the entire perimeter of everything and have it manned by police, or have the beer gardens, which was their preference.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Marijuana decriminalization keeps in place the tax-free, gangster-subsidizing, anarchistic black market for pot ("O'Malley signs 'Jake's Law,' marijuana decriminalization," April 14). Only complete legalization deprives the gangsters of the $193.1 million a year that retail pot sales are worth in Maryland. That's based on Colorado's $14 million first-month retail sales of pot. The actual gateway to pot for kids is the existing prohibition. Politicians who support the continued prohibition of pot, including decriminalization, are only supporting the gangsters and abusers having unfettered, tax-free access to kids on the street.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
Rep. Andy Harris offered up the prohibitionist's minority point of view regarding marijuana ( "Marijuana decriminalization: up in smoke," April 1). Fact is, if he represents his constituents, he will support ending cannabis prohibition immediately since the majority of Americans no long support it or want to pay for it. Cannabis prohibition has been one of America's worst policy failures in history, dependent on lies, half-truths and propaganda which are being exposed like never before.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
It was March 30, 1923, and Carroll County, like the rest of the nation, was in the depths of Prohibition. Prohibition, known as the Volstead Act, did not go into effect throughout the nation until Jan. 20, 1920. But Carroll Countians had voted to outlaw the sale of alcohol in the county six years earlier, in 1914, according to research by historian Jay Graybeal for the Historical Society of Carroll County. Prohibition remained the law of the land until the passage of the 21st Amendment on Dec. 5, 1933.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Welcoming bars are nothing new in downtown Annapolis, and restaurants that celebrate southern food and Prohibition's repeal are nothing new anywhere anymore. But Dry 85, which opened on Main Street on the first day of 2014, combines all those things, creating something that is fun and surprisingly fresh. With a smart drinks list and food that is, for the most part, very good, it's a welcome addition the street. Scene & Decor The name Dry 85 refers to Washington D.C.'s 85 booze-free days between the repeal of Prohibition and the repeal of the Sheppard Act, which outlawed alcoholic beverages in the capital.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Despite all the opinions I have read recently, I was still stunned by the anti-marijuana-legalization screed in your paper arguing we should continue marijuana prohibition because alcohol prohibition was so successful ("Supporters of marijuana legalization misread history," March 11). Say what? Do the editors even read the stuff your op-ed writers send in before you publish it? Because I can't think of one other person who has ever argued that Prohibition was a success. And I'm not talking about starry eyed liberals.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | December 3, 2003
THIS WEEK marks the 70th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition, so to celebrate I recently mixed up a batch of speakeasy cocktails. The recipes for concoctions called Horse's Neck, Flu Cocktail and Rock and Rye came from Manhattan Oases, a book originally published in 1932 that was written and illustrated by Al Hirschfeld, the noted theatrical caricaturist who died in January at the age of 99. As a young man about town, Hirschfeld toured dozens of...
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins | July 1, 1992
THE Supreme Court's strange decision on abortion Monday -- upholding the "core" right of women to terminate pregnancy while at the same time upholding state laws sharply limiting the exercise of that right -- may well have set the stage for a repeat of the prolonged political firestorms generated by Prohibition in the early part of the century.There is, fortunately, a way to avoid replication of that lamentable experience if voters will only take matters into their own hands.The most cursory review of the history of Prohibition produces a sense of deju vu when we survey the abortion issue today.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 28, 2014
Playing poker or bridge at home with cash stakes would become legal under a bill approved this week by the Senate. Though rarely enforced, it is a misdemeanor in Maryland for individuals to gamble, even in the privacy of their own homes. Sen. Nancy J. King, a Montgomery County Democrat and the bill's chief sponsor, called it a "common sense" bill that would allow family and friends to play games at home without fear of arrest or prosecution. Under the bill passed unanimously on Thursday, wagering may not be done over the Internet, and game hosts may not receive any compensation beyond whatever they might win.
NEWS
By Barry Considine | February 24, 2014
In 1982, the late Gov. William Donald Schaefer was running for his last term as mayor. He held one of those big dinners that politicians are famous for at P.J. Crickets on Pratt St. All the political leaders were there. I was the chef that evening and can honestly tell you this: When I arrived at the restaurant that afternoon, I climbed in to the back of my blue VW Mini-Camper and smoked a bowl of marijuana. That evening many of the attendees stuck their heads into the kitchen to thank the chef for the wonderful meal they had enjoyed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.