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By Michael Dresser | May 7, 2014
Apparently following its head rather than its heart, the activist group Progressive Maryland threw its support behind Lt. Anthony G. Brown in the Democratic raceĀ for governor -- passing on the chance to embrace the liberal candidacy of Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County. Elbridge James, chairman of the group, said Progressive Maryland decided to endorse Brown after "a lot of discussion and re-discussion. " "We love Heather," said James, but at the end of the day the group's 24-member vote decided that Brown was the most viable candidate.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | May 7, 2014
Apparently following its head rather than its heart, the activist group Progressive Maryland threw its support behind Lt. Anthony G. Brown in the Democratic raceĀ for governor -- passing on the chance to embrace the liberal candidacy of Del. Heather R. Mizeur of Montgomery County. Elbridge James, chairman of the group, said Progressive Maryland decided to endorse Brown after "a lot of discussion and re-discussion. " "We love Heather," said James, but at the end of the day the group's 24-member vote decided that Brown was the most viable candidate.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
Hoping to shift the debate over how to balance the state budget, a liberal advocacy group released a plan yesterday to close the deficit without legalizing slot machines, cutting programs or raising taxes for most Maryland residents. Progressive Maryland said the state can save $1.7 billion if lawmakers close tax "loopholes" and raise taxes for businesses and the wealthiest residents. Several Democratic legislators -- including the House majority leader, Del. Kumar P. Barve of Montgomery County -- embraced the proposal, but Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. immediately dismissed it. The Republican also made clear that he does not plan to work with or take advice from Progressive Maryland, made up of dozens of community groups and 10,000 state residents interested in social justice.
NEWS
By Matthew H. Joseph | October 17, 2011
Maryland schools are spending a fortune to raise achievement - $60,000 for each additional student who becomes proficient. It's too high a price for the results we have been getting. We need to do better. Between 2003 and 2009, Maryland increased school funding by nearly 50 percent, or more than $3.5 billion a year. The impact can be measured by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Fourth- and eighth-graders in each state are tested in reading and math. Proficiency on these tests is, according to the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation, the clearest indicator of whether a student has the minimum skills needed to succeed in the international economy.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | December 2, 2006
The Maryland director for Common Cause, a national government watchdog group, said she resigned this week amid a dispute over whether she should pursue a campaign finance complaint against an allied group. But a spokeswoman for the national organization said yesterday that it has never seen any documentation for the complaint the former state director, Bobbie Walton, made against Progressive Maryland this week. The complaint - and a news release highlighting Common Cause's role in pursuing it - were the "renegade actions of a former employee," said the spokeswoman, Mary Boyle.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2002
With Maryland facing a $1.2 billion budget hole next year, the time has come to end tax breaks for ski mountains, country clubs and purchasers of bulk gold and platinum, says a group that has scoured the state tax code for loopholes. Progressive Maryland, an alliance of labor unions, faith-based organizations and community groups, said yesterday it has identified 52 tax exceptions that primarily benefit corporations and the wealthy. Their elimination would generate at least $421 million for the state budget, meaning vital services to children and seniors could be spared cuts, the report concludes.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
The current bill making its way through the Baltimore City Council to require retailers with gross sales over $10 million to pay their employees a living wage is an important piece of legislation which was unnecessarily maligned by columnist Marta Mossburg ("Baltimore can't live with this 'living wage' bill," July 20). Every study which has been conducted on living wage laws has shown they do not increase the cost to employers, because the higher wages paid lead to decreased turnover, which lowers the costs of hiring and training as well as reducing workplace errors.
BUSINESS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2004
Small businesses would gain if Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. allows Maryland to become the first state in the nation with a "living wage" requirement, minority business leaders said yesterday in urging the governor to reconsider a pledge to veto the initiative. A minimum $10.50 wage for employees participating in state contracts would provide more money for lower-class workers to spend, boosting the economy and offsetting costs associated with the proposal, said business group leaders who gathered in Annapolis to support the legislation.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
Public financing of state political campaigns would offset business lobbyists' financial advantages over advocates for nonprofit organizations and social causes in the Maryland General Assembly, according to a report released yesterday by a nonprofit group. The report by Progressive Maryland, a liberal advocacy group, argues that removing the influence of campaign contributions would end the "sense of quid pro quo" that ensures corporate lobbyists' access to lawmakers. "Typically, you look at proliferating lobbyists, and most people focus on that as the problem.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
A liberal advocacy group has asked the attorney general's office to investigate whether the governor had a conflict of interest in vetoing a tax bill that could have cost his wife's employer money. Tom Hucker, executive director of Progressive Maryland, said yesterday the group wants Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. to examine Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s veto of a bill that would have prevented corporations from shifting assets to Delaware to avoid taxes. Records show that Comcast Cable Communications Inc. has hundreds of subsidiaries incorporated in Delaware, and first lady Kendel Ehrlich is a part-time Comcast employee.
NEWS
February 8, 2011
They're at it again, trying to bump up the minimum wage in Maryland from $7.25 to $10 per hour in 2013 ("Raising the standard," editorial, Jan. 21). Happily, even some of the Democrats recognize that if we want to create jobs then we shouldn't go around making it more expensive to employ people. I give Sen. Thomas Middleton (Democrat of Charles County) credit for pointing out that, "We're trying to create jobs. We're trying to hold on to what we've got. I think raising the minimum wage goes against that.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
Measuring economic growth is fairly straightforward work and shows that America's lot has steadily improved over the past seven decades. But with crime, climate change and longer commutes, are we really better off? Maryland's state government is attempting to answer that question by quantifying in dollars the big influences on our well-being that seemingly defy calculation, such air quality and traffic congestion. Its new Genuine Progress Indicator is part of a growing movement to stop using gross domestic product, the closely tracked yardstick of goods and services produced, as a simplified stand-in for measuring quality of life.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
The current bill making its way through the Baltimore City Council to require retailers with gross sales over $10 million to pay their employees a living wage is an important piece of legislation which was unnecessarily maligned by columnist Marta Mossburg ("Baltimore can't live with this 'living wage' bill," July 20). Every study which has been conducted on living wage laws has shown they do not increase the cost to employers, because the higher wages paid lead to decreased turnover, which lowers the costs of hiring and training as well as reducing workplace errors.
NEWS
May 7, 2010
The Sun was wrong in 2005 which it opposed making large employers pay for their employees' health care, and The Sun is wrong now in opposing requiring large employers to pay a living wage to their employees ("Another Wal-Mart bill?" May 5). In fact, Maryland's action then put it on the forefront of the national movement toward the recently-passed health reform. Similarly, the Baltimore City legislation proposed by Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke would put the city back on the forefront of localities raising the standard of living of low-wage workers.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
An influential state senator who has been the subject of a federal corruption probe used campaign contributions to pay $41,500 in apparent criminal defense legal fees over the past year, despite a 2008 Maryland attorney general's advice letter that bars such spending. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat who heads the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, declined to answer questions about the payments to a prominent criminal defense attorney recorded on his annual campaign finance report.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
We need the public option For The Sun to say that we should ditch the public option to avoid an "ugly debate" is to give veto power to those willing to turn the debate ugly, by whom I mean the ranting and raving right-wingers with their shameless nonsense about death panels and National Socialism ("Wise compromise," Dec. 10). Talk about rewarding bad behavior. The public option may be, as you say, a "means to an end," but it's not just any means toward the ends of competition and cost control - it's by far the best means, according to the Congressional Budget Office and other objective observers.
NEWS
February 8, 2011
They're at it again, trying to bump up the minimum wage in Maryland from $7.25 to $10 per hour in 2013 ("Raising the standard," editorial, Jan. 21). Happily, even some of the Democrats recognize that if we want to create jobs then we shouldn't go around making it more expensive to employ people. I give Sen. Thomas Middleton (Democrat of Charles County) credit for pointing out that, "We're trying to create jobs. We're trying to hold on to what we've got. I think raising the minimum wage goes against that.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Claiming Maryland's tax code is full of "fiscal wet kisses" for corporations and the wealthy, an advocacy group issued a report yesterday identifying 28 exemptions that it says cost the state $162 million a year with scant public benefit. The report by Progressive Maryland - an umbrella group of labor unions, churches and other organizations - says the state loses $34.8 million a year by exempting health maintenance organizations from paying taxes on their premiums, $15.4 million from credits compensating utilities and telecommunications companies for local property tax increases, and $650,000 for letting country clubs claim "open space" property tax status.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
For The Sun to say that we should ditch the public option to avoid an "ugly debate" is to give veto power to those willing to turn the debate ugly, by whom I mean the ranting and raving right-wingers with their shameless nonsense about death panels and National Socialism ("Wise compromise," Dec. 10). Talk about rewarding bad behavior. The public option may be, as you say, a "means to an end," but it's not just any means toward the ends of competition and cost control - it's by far the best means, according to the Congressional Budget Office and other objective observers.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
A proposal for public financing of General Assembly campaigns appears dead this year after a fiery debate in the Maryland Senate over the idea of using taxpayer dollars for political activities. Senators made several changes to the bill, argued over its necessity and complained that the full implications were unclear before voting, 27-20, Wednesday to send the bill back to committee. The procedural move means that further work on the bill is unlikely this legislative session, which ends in less than three weeks.
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