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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2004
When school opens in September, Baltimore students will find at least two more students in every class than they had this year. If they are behind academically, they won't have had the chance to attend summer school to catch up. And if they are in a low-performing school with an inexperienced teacher, chances are the teacher won't have a mentor to help with that hard first year of teaching. These are a few examples of the costs Baltimore schools will pay as they come to terms with a $58 million deficit.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2001
In September, during the first few weeks of the school year, Shannon Flowers would hand out homework assignments to the 20 fourth-graders in her class, and about six would complete them. Now, almost all do. "All you can see is improvement, right?" she says. "That's what I'm looking toward. All this [effort] I'm putting in right now, there will be a light at the end of the tunnel." It is a new year at Furman L. Templeton, one of three elementary schools in Baltimore being run by a for-profit company, Edison Schools.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
An executive committee of the Carroll Cable Regulatory Commission plans to meet today with representatives of Adelphia Communications Corp. in an attempt to resolve long-standing issues - under the threat of a lawsuit by the county group. The meeting was scheduled after the cable commission voted 5-0 last week to take legal action by the end of this month if the members were not satisfied with their progress, said Ken Decker, chairman since 2001 of the eight-member cable commission, which includes the county and seven of its eight incorporated towns (all but Manchester)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | March 29, 2012
Johns Hopkins' 11-10 overtime win against Virginia vaulted the Blue Jays to the top of many polls and rankings. But being No. 1 is not something that is weighs on the players or coaches, according to coach Dave Pietramala. “It doesn't matter,” he said Wednesday. “You could pick a lot of teams for No. 1. UMass is 8-0, Loyola is 8-0. Part of that is just where you were ranked originally. I would tell you that being No. 1 doesn't mean anything right now.” Johns Hopkins (8-0)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
His parents see the change every time he plops down on the floor with a book. His teacher notices it when he eagerly raises his hand to sound out an unfamiliar word. Even Wade realizes that something has happened to him in Room 8 this school year."I'm reading," he says, flashing a crooked grin as he looks up from a book about dinosaurs. "I know the words."It's a brand new world for 6-year-old Wade Humphrey.Suddenly, almost as if by magic, the letters all around are starting to make sense.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Three years into national education reforms that strive to close achievement gaps, the rate of academic progress among special-education pupils and English language learners continues to pose a challenge for Carroll County schools officials. In Carroll, one elementary school and two middle schools failed to make the mark this year, mainly because of weak performances in reading and math among special-education pupils on the Maryland State Assessments, according to preliminary data released last week.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 1, 2012
A week ago, the Ravens' top two tight ends returned to the team's practice field for the first time in almost a month, reducing doubt that Ed Dickson and Dennis Pitta would be unable to suit up for the regular-season opener against the Cincinnati Bengals on Sept. 10. Since that Saturday, Dickson - who sprained his right shoulder while catching a 9-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Joe Flacco in the second quarter of an eventual 31-17 win against the Atlanta Falcons on Aug. 9 - and Pitta - who broke a bone in his right hand during practice July 30 - have increasingly raised their level of participation in practice.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock, and Jay Hancock,,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 10, 2000
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. -- Israeli and Syrian diplomats, winding down a week of peace talks, have agreed to use a U.S. working document as a "starting point" for a peace agreement but are still far apart on critical issues, including security and borders, U.S. officials said yesterday. President Clinton, who presented the seven-page document Friday, returned late yesterday afternoon to underscore the latest steps taken in this picturesque town and set the stage for further negotiations. Today is to be another "full working day" for the negotiators, but it was not immediately clear if all the committees on the most critical issues, including security and borders, would meet, as they did yesterday in what was seen as another positive sign.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - Two months after the terrorist assaults on America, President Bush called for a resurgence of volunteerism to strengthen local communities against possible attacks in the future. Bush made no new announcements last night about the progress of his anti-terror campaign, which has produced no arrests at home and slower-than-expected results in Afghanistan. Instead, the president tried to lift the spirits of public safety officials on the front lines of the fight against domestic terrorism, while seeking to bolster the resolve of ordinary Americans.
SPORTS
May 4, 2007
Heather A. Dinich explains how the Maryland men's basketball team could lose scholarships if it doesn't raise its Academic Progress Rate. Go to baltimoresun.com/dinich.
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