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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2011
In a spring of transition for the Maryland football team, first-year coach Randy Edsall and his staff are working hard to raise the quality of his team's performance on and off the field. While Edsall has seen progress on both fronts, there's a long way to go before the team meets his lofty standards. "The spring is never going to meet the expectations that I'm looking for because you're not going to be the finished product," Edsall said in a conference call with reporters Monday.
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NEWS
August 9, 1994
Negotiations resumed yesterday between representatives of the baseball players and owners, but no movement occurred.In fact, with three days left before Friday's strike deadline, the two sides didn't even address the sticking point in the talks -- the owners' proposal to institute a salary cap."No progress was made on the critical economic issue," owners negotiator Richard Ravitch said.Meanwhile, the Orioles must consider their progress. And if there is a strike, columnist Ken Rosenthal says, the Orioles should have a new manager whenever play resumes.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | September 27, 2006
Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro's left hind foot continues to make steady progress, but he still has a long way to go, according to his surgeon, Dr. Dean Richardson at the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital, where Barbaro remains in stable condition. "The left hind hoof on Barbaro has grown about 18 millimeters in the heel area," said Richardson, describing the progress being made in the foot that lost 100 percent of its hoof wall when laminitis, a severe inflammation, developed from overuse six weeks after the Derby champion broke his leg in the May 20th Preakness.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | August 22, 2007
It is not just in Iraq that the political left has an investment in failure. Domestically as well as internationally, the left has long had a vested interest in poverty and social malaise. The old advertising slogan, "Progress is our most important product," has never applied to the left. Whether it is successful black schools in the United States or Third World countries where millions of people have been rising out of poverty in recent years, the left has shown little interest. Progress in general seems to hold little interest for people who call themselves "progressives."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Thirty years ago, after the historic Kerner Commission predicted a deepening racial divide in the United States, an offshoot group is lamenting how true that prediction turned out to be.That's a mistake, in my humble view. I think they should be celebrating how wrong the prediction turned out to be.The Kerner Riot Commission was created by President Lyndon B. Johnson and headed by former Illinois Gov. Otto Kerner during a period when the nation was having about 100 civil disturbances a year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 18, 2001
Baltimore's air quality has greatly improved during the past 20 years, as the average number of days in which smog exceeded federal standards dropped from 24.7 a year in the early 1980s to 9.7 a year in the late 1990s, according to a business advocacy group report to be released today. The city ranks in the nation's top 20 for progress in cleaning its air, according to the report by the Foundation for Clean Air Progress, which advocates for energy, manufacturing, transportation, farming and tourism businesses.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The annual winter meetings usually contain more style than substance, hyped in the days leading up to the event and ultimately ending with most teams making few moves. While the Orioles spent this week in the Gaylord Opryland Hotel at the root of many trade and free-agent rumors that led to few actual transactions, executive vice president Dan Duquette was pleased with the moves the club made. The Orioles arrived at the winter meetings looking to trade for a power hitter, a goal that didn't happen this week, but will be something to monitor as the offseason progresses.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | July 2, 1991
The strike by 3,200 workers at the General Motors Corp.'s Southeast Baltimore minivan assembly plant moved into its second week yesterday with the union reporting only slight progress in talks.Rodney A. Trump, president of Local 239 of the United Auto Workers union, said there was "minuscule progress" at yesterday's short meeting of the union's and company's main negotiating teams."I'd call it a baby step [toward settlement]," he added.It was the second consecutive day in which the union reported progress toward settlement.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | October 11, 2006
The Ravens don't need to search for an offensive identity because they found a new one yesterday. Let's call them No. 29. That's where their offense was ranked among the 32 NFL teams. A week ago, they were No. 28. And if you look at the team's recent history and some of the offensive personnel in 2006, there probably won't be significant progress during the season. They could be No. 30 next Monday. They could be No. 27 in two weeks, and No. 25 a week later. That won't change the perception of this team.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2000
A Verizon Communications executive said yesterday that "very significant progress" had been made in the talks between the company and its union workers - on the fifth day of their strike - and expressed hope that a new collective bargaining agreement could be reached very soon. Union officials characterized the progress with a bit more reserve. About 87,000 workers from the Communications Workers of America and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers went on strike at 12:01 a.m. Sunday, just after their two-year contracts expired.
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