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Programs For Children

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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
Hoping to demonstrate the need for Howard County's services for children with serious emotional and mental disorders, local advocacy groups last week took a group of state and county politicians on a tour of area programs."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Michael Laban Malin, a manager for a Kennedy Krieger Institute program for autistic children who was recalled for his outgoing personality, died of brain cancer Tuesday at his mother's North Baltimore home. He was 34 and lived with his family in Canton. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of David Hirsh Malin, a co-founder of the Jemicy School, and Judith Ann Malin, an administrator at St. Elizabeth's School in Northeast Baltimore. He attended the Baltimore Montessori School and was a 1998 graduate of Friends School, where he played soccer and lacrosse and sang in the school chorus.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
In its largest gift to support public schools in the mid-Atlantic region, NationsBank has given $250,000 to pay for Baltimore programs to improve children's health and fitness and increase parental involvement.The grant will allow two elementary and middle schools -- Westport Elementary/Middle School and Lakeland Elementary/Middle School -- to take advantage of well-proven programs from the Johns Hopkins University and the Harvard School of Public Health.Children will receive help from mentors, take part in drug abuse prevention programs and have opportunities to be part of Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Maryland.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 19, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore will launch a Montessori program, its first, at St. Pius X Catholic School in Rodgers Forge in 2011, Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien announced Wednesday. O'Brien said St. Pius X will partner with Loyola University Maryland, which has a graduate program in Montessori education. As the archdiocese describes it, the Montessori method "allows children to proceed at their own pace and focuses on all aspects of human development — intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual — to make learning an exciting process of discovery."
NEWS
By DIANE MIKULIS and DIANE MIKULIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 2000
Buoyed by aggressive promotion - and a wave of interest in books generated by the fourth installment in the Harry Potter series - libraries statewide say they enjoyed significant gains in the number of children participating in their summer reading programs. In Baltimore County, participation was up 5 percent, to 27,194, with 10 of 16 branches reaching all-time highs. At the Catonsville branch, 29 percent more children participated this year than last. North Point had a 23 percent rise.
NEWS
September 14, 1997
*TC AN ITEM in last week's column gave the wrong information number for the county Department of Recreation and Parks' liberal arts programs for children.The correct number is 410-222-7300.I'm sorry for the inconvenience.Pub Date: 9/14/97
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 1, 1997
WHITE MARSH -- An open house, featuring video identification and fingerprinting programs for children, will be VTC held Saturday at the Police Department's White Marsh Precinct, 8220 Perry Hall Blvd.The program, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., will also help precinct members celebrate their 10th anniversary. The event will feature demonstrations by SWAT team members, the Aviation Unit, police dogs and their handlers, and other specialty groups.Information: 410-887-5035.Pub Date: 10/01/97
FEATURES
March 14, 1991
"Extra! Extra! The Newspaper Exhibition" is a permanent exhibit at the Cloisters Children's Museum, 10440 Falls Road. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Special programs for children 2 to 12 years of age are planned on most weekends. Admission is $3; $2 for senior citizens; free to members and children younger than 2. For more information, phone 823-2550.
NEWS
October 23, 1995
North Carroll branch library will have several programs for children next month."Makin' Music," for infants to age 3, will be offered Nov. 6. Registration begins today."
NEWS
December 1, 2003
Gordon Mumpower to lead the Arc's Chocolate Ball Gordon M. Mumpower Jr., owner of Commercial Insurance Managers, will be chairman of the Arc of Howard County's Chocolate Ball for the seventh year. The ball will be from 7 p.m. to midnight March 20 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory's Kossiakoff Center. The event includes an auction, dinner catered by Putting on the Ritz and dancing to the music of Opus One. Tickets are $100. Mumpower's team for the Chocolate Ball includes Walter von Rauzenkranz, Chip McAuliffe, Kari Meachum, Pam Guzzone, Anne Ryan and Nancy McLay of the Arc. Last year's Chocolate Ball raised more than $75,000 for the Arc, which provides vocational and residential support and services, respite care, educational advocacy, and other programs for children and adults with developmental disabilities.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 21, 2008
When Marin Alsop began her tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last year, she put a high priority on developing educational projects that could bring together the institution and the surrounding community, especially those parts not being reached by the orchestra. Yesterday, Alsop announced the launch of OrchKids, an after-school music program spearheaded by the BSO, in conjunction with a partnership of city organizations, and pledged $100,000 of her own money to support it. Inspired by the success of the countrywide El Sistema program in Venezuela, which provides musical training and social outlets for several hundred thousand low-income children, OrchKids will begin as a pilot program with about 25 first-graders at Harriet Tubman Elementary in West Baltimore, starting in September.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | January 20, 2008
Tucked away in a meeting room in the back of the Abingdon YMCA, a group of children sat around a table, chatting and eating a quick dinner of chicken fingers, vegetables, fruit and a cookie for dessert. When the plates were cleared, the children directed their attention to the front of the room. "Why are we here today?" asked Patsy Astarita, a clinical oncology social worker. "Because one of our people in our family has cancer," answered Ned Maxwell of Hickory. "And we want to learn more about what cancer is."
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2007
Melissa Calleri Recreation coordinator Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks Salary --$37,500 Age --27 Years on the job --Two How she got started --"It was a fluke," said Calleri, who attended Green Mountain College in Vermont. "I was there for graphic design." But after working with a friend at a nearby summer camp for children and adults with special needs, she knew she would pursue recreation as a career. Calleri graduated with a degree in therapeutic recreation. From there, she moved back to Maryland and completed her internship working with the City of Greenbelt's therapeutic recreation program.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | July 1, 2007
In February, when Tracy Feld, owner of the Howard County KidzArt franchise, approached Alison Gunner about holding classes at Harmony Hall, the activities coordinator was skeptical. Residents of the assisted-living center are elderly and suffer from dementia, and it was hard for Gunner to imagine them staying focused long enough to benefit from art instruction. She also wondered whether an art program designed for children would be suitable for her clients, she recalled.
NEWS
August 13, 2006
The Columbia Association's Teen Advisory Committee will sponsor a Teen Showcase from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Aug. 22 at the Columbia lakefront. The concert will feature a break dance club, Anti-Lock Brakes, and four teen bands: Parking Lot Nights, American Diary, Hence Reverie and The Drop Out Year. Information: Carol Wasser, 410-715-5523. Registration is on for tot play groups The Town Center Community Association is accepting registration for its fall session of Parents & Tots Play Groups, which begin the week of Sept.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Six years ago, Linda Turner's world was turned upside down when her 28-year-old husband, Kurt, was killed by a drunken driver. Turner, now 37, was unable to find sources of compassionate care outside of her family. "I felt like the youngest widow in the world," said Turner, whose son, Jonathan, is now almost 7 years old. "The whole trial thing was very difficult. [Survivors] don't know what to expect in the long term." Two years ago, Turner, who has a degree in marketing from the University of Maryland, decided that she could best use her experience in grief and healing by becoming a pastoral counselor and enrolled in Loyola College's Pastoral Counseling Program.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
Harford Community College offering summer programs for children and teenagers Harford Community College is offering a variety of summer camps and programs for children and teens. A teen boat-building class is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 1-5 at the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum. Using precut parts, glue, nails and paint, participants will build double-paddle canoes. A fee of $390 is due at orientation. Information: 410-836-4376 or 410-679-8920, ext. 376. Olympic Games Camps for boys and girls in grades one through nine are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 8-12.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2001
Legislators sharply criticized top officials from several state agencies yesterday for ignoring the General Assembly's wishes in how Maryland should be helping young children. Members of the Joint Committee on Children, Youth and Families said that although the Assembly has decided that the state's top priority should be ensuring children enter school ready to learn, some agencies are acting too slowly and setting their own agendas. "We've been trying to get the subcabinet to focus on this priority as the wedge to crack the big problem open, which would help all of the other problems," said Del. Anne Healey, a Prince George's Democrat.
NEWS
August 7, 2005
Library offers workshops on effective home schooling Monthly workshops are available at the Harford County Public Library in Bel Air to help parents who are home schooling their children do so more effectively. A panel of home educators will discuss getting the year off to a great start at 6:30 p.m. Thursday. The workshop is open to new or experienced parents with children of any age. "The Beginning Years," a workshop for parents with children in prekindergarten to first grade, will be offered at 6:30 p.m. Sept.
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