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Programming For Children

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NEWS
August 4, 1993
For adult television viewers, commercials are an interruption in regular programming, a time to break away for a trip to the refrigerator or an invitation to channel surf. For children, a commercial is part of the show. Studies indicate children under 7 pay as much attention to commercials as regular programming. Few kids understand the purpose of a commercial; they don't watch TV with the critical eye of older viewers.Helping children become critics of what they see on the small screen is a goal of the Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV, which released its first "report card" on local TV. "Report Card '93" is the work of community teams, each of which adopted a station in order to monitor the quality, quantity, timing and variety of its programming for children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Michael Laban Malin, a manager for a Kennedy Krieger Institute program for autistic children who was recalled for his outgoing personality, died of brain cancer Tuesday at his mother's North Baltimore home. He was 34 and lived with his family in Canton. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of David Hirsh Malin, a co-founder of the Jemicy School, and Judith Ann Malin, an administrator at St. Elizabeth's School in Northeast Baltimore. He attended the Baltimore Montessori School and was a 1998 graduate of Friends School, where he played soccer and lacrosse and sang in the school chorus.
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NEWS
September 24, 1995
COMMERCIAL TELEVISION stations in the Baltimore-Washington area have improved their programming for children in the past year -- but only slightly. The Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV gave an overall grade of "C" to the stations' performance, up from "C-" last year. Even so, there is a long way to go, in quantity, quality and timing. When stations do provide good programs for children, too many of them get buried in very early morning slots when most young viewers are still asleep.Despite these signs of progress, it's easy to understand the frustration that has prompted Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt to propose tougher regulations.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 19, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore will launch a Montessori program, its first, at St. Pius X Catholic School in Rodgers Forge in 2011, Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien announced Wednesday. O'Brien said St. Pius X will partner with Loyola University Maryland, which has a graduate program in Montessori education. As the archdiocese describes it, the Montessori method "allows children to proceed at their own pace and focuses on all aspects of human development — intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual — to make learning an exciting process of discovery."
NEWS
July 28, 1993
It took a decade of lobbying by child advocacy groups to win passage of a law addressing the dismal state of television programming for children. It may well take another decade to ensure that stations comply with the law. The first "report card" for commercial stations serving Maryland viewers has bad news -- and good.The bad news is that commercial stations in the area so far have been "seriously deficient" in their efforts to comply with the law, earning only a D+. But the good news for Marylanders is the grass-roots interest that produced the report.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- With a second White House TV "summit" set for tomorrow, the White House has been laboring furiously to bring the networks to a compromise on providing three hours of educational programming for children per week.President Clinton has made children's television a campaign issue, and White House officials had hoped that the summit would be a high-profile celebration of the creation of government guidelines on children's television by the Federal Communications Commission.But the FCC, under Chairman Reed Hundt, a Clinton appointee, has been locked in a stalemate over the children's TV requirements.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
Television stations across the state will get report cards beginning early next year grading how well they have implemented the federal Children's Television Act of 1990, as part of a new Maryland Campaign for Kids' TV.Launched in Baltimore last night with a preview screening of tonight's PBS program "On Television: Teach the Children" (at 9 p.m., Maryland Public Television), the campaign also plans to publish a guide to help parents develop responsible viewing in their children."Television is too pervasive to just say you're going to censor it," said Charlene Uhl, coordinator of the community-based project.
NEWS
October 8, 1990
Couch potatoes come in all ages. But the youngest ones are often those most pummeled by television advertising. They are also the most susceptible to the lures of snappy advertising and least able to distinguish commercials from real programs.Children in this country simply watch too much television -- 25 hours a week on average -- and since 1984, when the FCC rescinded guidelines limiting commercials during children's shows, kids have been subjected to more than their share of commercials -- including whole shows designed around specific toys, making them, in effect, program-length commercials.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,New York Daily News | January 9, 1992
Action for Children's Television, which for 23 years fought for better TV programming for children, will go out of business by the end of the year, president Peggy Charren announced yesterday.The organization, which Charren founded in her Cambridge, Mass., living room, is closing up because it achieved one of its main goals with the passage of the 1990 Children's Television Act, whose guidelines took effect Jan. 1, 1992.The new law limits the number of ads broadcasters may run in children's shows and requires local stations to air educational programs in order to get their licenses renewed.
FEATURES
By Marc Gunther and Marc Gunther,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1994
Critics who want television to provide more educational programs for children won support yesterday from the government's top broadcast regulator, who said "the business of educating kids should be part of the TV business."Reed Hundt, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, opened the FCC's first hearing on children's programming in 10 years by urging the industry to serve children better."There's a battle going on for the hearts and minds of our children," Mr. Hundt said. "TV is the battleground.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 21, 2008
When Marin Alsop began her tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last year, she put a high priority on developing educational projects that could bring together the institution and the surrounding community, especially those parts not being reached by the orchestra. Yesterday, Alsop announced the launch of OrchKids, an after-school music program spearheaded by the BSO, in conjunction with a partnership of city organizations, and pledged $100,000 of her own money to support it. Inspired by the success of the countrywide El Sistema program in Venezuela, which provides musical training and social outlets for several hundred thousand low-income children, OrchKids will begin as a pilot program with about 25 first-graders at Harriet Tubman Elementary in West Baltimore, starting in September.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2007
Melissa Calleri Recreation coordinator Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks Salary --$37,500 Age --27 Years on the job --Two How she got started --"It was a fluke," said Calleri, who attended Green Mountain College in Vermont. "I was there for graphic design." But after working with a friend at a nearby summer camp for children and adults with special needs, she knew she would pursue recreation as a career. Calleri graduated with a degree in therapeutic recreation. From there, she moved back to Maryland and completed her internship working with the City of Greenbelt's therapeutic recreation program.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | July 1, 2007
In February, when Tracy Feld, owner of the Howard County KidzArt franchise, approached Alison Gunner about holding classes at Harmony Hall, the activities coordinator was skeptical. Residents of the assisted-living center are elderly and suffer from dementia, and it was hard for Gunner to imagine them staying focused long enough to benefit from art instruction. She also wondered whether an art program designed for children would be suitable for her clients, she recalled.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Six years ago, Linda Turner's world was turned upside down when her 28-year-old husband, Kurt, was killed by a drunken driver. Turner, now 37, was unable to find sources of compassionate care outside of her family. "I felt like the youngest widow in the world," said Turner, whose son, Jonathan, is now almost 7 years old. "The whole trial thing was very difficult. [Survivors] don't know what to expect in the long term." Two years ago, Turner, who has a degree in marketing from the University of Maryland, decided that she could best use her experience in grief and healing by becoming a pastoral counselor and enrolled in Loyola College's Pastoral Counseling Program.
SPORTS
By Luke W. Broadwater and Luke W. Broadwater,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
In front of $15,000 worth of new boxing equipment, Mayor Martin O'Malley announced the start of the mayor's Youth Boxing Program yesterday at the Herring Run Recreation Center. Nearly 200 people listened as numerous guests, including world heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman, spoke on the positive influence the program could have on Baltimore. "Rahman told me that boxing saved his life," said O'Malley. The champ, who grew up in East Baltimore and now lives in Harford County, said the new program "represents a different avenue these children can travel."
NEWS
By DIANE MIKULIS and DIANE MIKULIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 2000
Buoyed by aggressive promotion - and a wave of interest in books generated by the fourth installment in the Harry Potter series - libraries statewide say they enjoyed significant gains in the number of children participating in their summer reading programs. In Baltimore County, participation was up 5 percent, to 27,194, with 10 of 16 branches reaching all-time highs. At the Catonsville branch, 29 percent more children participated this year than last. North Point had a 23 percent rise.
NEWS
January 11, 1993
As the New Year began, some of America's pre-school children got a nifty gift -- six hours of commercial-free programming scheduled to run each weekday. So now, if children live in a household with cable TV wired to systems that carry the Learning Channel and if an adult makes sure the set is tuned to that channel, these youngsters will be spared the endless commercials (12 minutes per hour on weekdays) and two dozen or so acts of violence per hour that characterize most television programming for children.
NEWS
By JAMES BOVARD | July 3, 1994
If someone proposed to solve the problem of children smoking cigarettes by forcing tobacco companies to create new low-nicotine brands especially for children, that person would be ridiculed even in Washington. Yet, if someone proposes to solve the problem of children going brain-dead from watching too much television by dictating federal standards for children's TV, that person is hailed as a social savior.As the Federal Communications Commission prepares to impose onerous burdens on the nation's broadcasters and cable companies, a re-examination of the Children's Television Act is long overdue.
TOPIC
By Lawrence Jackson | August 27, 2000
In late July, Jamie Clark, 16, became another victim of Baltimore's violence. Jamie got into a dispute with an older man in the 3500 block of Woodland Ave. and a fight ensued. During the struggle, a third man walked up to Jamie and shot him dead. No arrests have been made in connection with the killing. Jamie was known to family and friends for his poetry. His death is typical of the carnage that has claimed the lives of thousands of young black males in our city. Few of these deaths even make a ripple in the lives of the people who live in the other Baltimore, the glitzy town on the edge of the Inner Harbor.
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