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NEWS
September 6, 2002
Veronica Edith Stanton, a computer programmer, died of cancer Sunday at her mother's home in West Arlington. She was 39. For the past 14 years, she had been a programmer at Avaya Communications, a Halethorpe business formerly known as Lucent Technologies and AT&T. Born in Baltimore, she was a 1980 Forest Park High School honors graduate. She also studied at Baltimore City Community College and at ITT Institute, a technical school. She enjoyed reading and traveling in the Caribbean. Services will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Payne Memorial AME Church, 1714 Madison Ave., where she was a member.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A few months ago, Gov. Martin O'Malley grew frustrated with state government's lack of creativity on the environment. He challenged his staff to look for new ideas to help the Chesapeake Bay. In response, 80 bright minds from around the state — from precocious high-schoolers to CEOs of technology companies — hunkered down over the weekend at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater for a Chesapeake-oriented marathon programming competition,...
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NEWS
February 27, 2003
Mary J. Roemer, 80, computer programmer Mary J. Roemer, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. computer programmer, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 80 and had lived in Dundalk for nearly a half-century. The former Mary J. Sewell was born and raised in Tonkawa, Okla., and lived in Texas City, Texas, before moving to Dundalk in 1954. She worked as a barmaid before going to work at the Sparrows Point plant of Beth Steel as a keypunch operator in 1956.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Nearly 17,000 Broadstripe cable TV subscribers could lose channels such as MTV, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, VH1 and BET if the Anne Arundel County cable provider and Viacom fail to reach an agreement by Tuesday. The dispute centers on monthly per-subscriber fees the cable company pays to carry Viacom's 23 networks. Such cutoffs typically are short-lived, lasting until the companies reach agreement. Millersville-based Broadstripe, which serves 16,684 customers in northern Anne Arundel County and part of Baltimore, said Viacom wants to substantially boost fees to renew its contract.
NEWS
December 27, 2003
Clayton A. Cunningham, a retired railroad computer programmer, died Wednesday of complications from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease at Franklin Square Hospital Medical Center. The Rosedale resident was 81. Born in West Russell, Ky., he attended the University of Arkansas. During World War II he was an Army staff sergeant and medical records clerk who served in France. In his 38 years with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, he worked in various capacities and retired in 1979 as a computer programmer.
NEWS
February 26, 2005
Michael H. Higgins Jr., a retired computer programmer and rail and streetcar buff, died of heart failure Feb. 16 at a hospital in Carlisle, Pa. The former Northeast Baltimore resident was 65. Mr. Higgins was born in Baltimore and raised on Kirk Avenue. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, he served in the Air Force in the late 1950s and 1960s. He earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Baltimore in 1972, and a year later began working for the state government as a computer programmer.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 1, 1999
An education programmer at the Children's Museum of Indian-apolis has been named the new curator of Annapolis' Banneker-Douglass Museum, state officials said yesterday.Marian Carpenter, who also has served as assistant program archivist for African-American history at the Indiana Historical Society, was selected last week for the newly created position at the museum, which has lacked leadership since its director was fired four months ago after less than a year on the job.A curator "is something that's been needed," said Carroll Hynson Jr., chairman of the Commission on African-American History and Culture.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
A 20-year-old Calvert County computer programmer was sentenced yesterday in federal court to 15 months in prison for sabotaging an Internal Revenue Service computer after learning that he was about to be fired from his contractor job. Claude R. Carpenter II of Sandy Wash Court in Lusby also was ordered to pay $108,000 in fines by U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow after he pleaded guilty in Greenbelt to causing damage to a federal computer....
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
You know The Fan. You've sat near him at a game, maybe had some of his beer slosh on you, even felt his sweaty, unsolicited hug when the Orioles scored. If you have children, you might have switched seats with them to put as much distance as possible between them and The Fan.Before the end of the first inning of Thursday night's game against the Boston Red Sox, a group of ushers was already descending upon Section 96, row N, with a stern warning: Any more incidents, and you're out. This lecture wasn't delivered directly to Mike Waldhauser, who happened to be perched in Seat 14 -- the spot The Sun has been periodically checking in on since Opening Day.No, it was Mike's buddy who had leapt into the air to cheer, spilling some beer on a young girl seated behind him. Mike, a clean-cut guy of 28, was instantly, magnanimously apologetic.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
When historians someday dissect the long chain of missteps that allowed the year 2000 computer bug to flourish, they will undoubtedly linger over the tale of a little-known programmer named Bob Bemer.For decades, Bemer has been an unheard prophet, warning anybody who would listen that using two-digit dates in computers was a prescription for trouble.Thirty years ago he lobbied government agencies to require four digits. He was snubbed. Twenty years ago, he published articles predicting that software polluted with shortened dates would haunt society at century's end. Programmers did it anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Downloading movies and watching them on a computer is not for George Figgs, who has spent the better part of three decades affording Baltimore cinephiles the chance to experience films the way God intended - in the dark, projected onto a bigger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a bunch of people whose only commonality is an urge to see how the on-screen story plays out. "I think people are tired of going to Netflix or Google or whatever, and...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Robert F. "Hop" Crooks, a retired Social Security Administration computer programmer, died Monday of complications from a massive epileptic seizure at Marshall Medical Center in Placerville, Calif. The longtime Oella and Catonsville resident was 65. Born in Baltimore and raised in Arbutus, Mr. Crooks was a 1964 graduate of Catonsville High School, where he had been an indoor and outdoor track star. After graduating from high school, he attended what as then Catonsville Community College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
A legendary set of call letters returned to the Baltimore airwaves Monday when CBS radio launched alternative rock station HFS at 97.5 on the FM dial. But competitors, like Dave Hill, the head of programming at 98 Rock (97.9 FM), dismissed the new HFS as a sorry imitation of the landmark rock station that in the 1970s and early '80s built a passionate following with its progressive, free-form programming. The HFS identity expanded in the 1990s with the annual HFStivals music fests.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
Geoffrey W. Moore, a former computer programmer and linguist, died Friday from complications of cystic fibrosis at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Lake-Walker resident was 36. Mr. Moore was born in Detroit and moved in 1976 with his family to the city's Lake-Walker neighborhood. He attended Loyola High School and graduated in 1996 from Towson Catholic High School. He attended the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. G. William Moore, a pathologist with the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, said his son had a talent for languages and was fluent in Japanese, German and Latin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
The Parkville boy's parents had deemed him too young for "Tron" when it played in theaters in 1982. But he loved it when he saw it several years later on a neighbor's VHS tape. Soon, he wanted to join the new frontier of electronic bulletin boards. To post, he had to pick a moniker. "A lot of people chose aliases like Dark Knight or Thunder Hawk," he said recently. "I logged on for a week as Tron. " By the end of the week he realized there were seven or eight people in Baltimore alone using Tron.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 5, 2010
John Joseph "Jody" Ferguson, a longtime computer programmer and talented athlete who regularly ran marathons and enjoyed swimming, died Friday at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center from complications of a seizure suffered last month. The Parkville resident was 39. Mr. Ferguson had suffered a seizure Sept. 15 while swimming at North Arundel Aquatic Center and was unconscious when removed from the pool by lifeguards. He had been in a coma since that time, said his brother, Terence T. Ferguson of Boston.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
Marcus Henry doesn't have to be a boxer - not with the looks of a model and his job as a computer programmer. But the Parkville resident says he's "in it for the love of the sport," which is why he swaps hours of excellent pay for trading blows during the grueling sparring sessions it takes to be an amateur boxer who travels nationwide and abroad while working toward becoming a professional world champion. U.S. vs. Belarus exhibition Tonight, 8, Michael's Eighth Avenue, Glen Burnie
NEWS
July 10, 1991
Graveside services for Douglas H. Carstens, who had been a restaurant manager and computer programmer, will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Loudon Park Cemetery, 3801 Frederick Ave.Mr. Carstens, who was 37 and lived in Snow Hill, died of a progressive neurological disease Saturday at the McCready ,X Memorial Hospital in Crisfield.Disabled because of his illness since the mid-1980s, he had managed the Carriage House Restaurant in Ellicott City during the late 1970s and the restaurant at the Ocean Pines Yacht Club during the early 1980s, then worked for a short time as a computer programmer for Atlantic Information Inc.Born in Baltimore and reared in Ellicott City, he was a 1971 graduate of the McDonogh School and a 1975 graduate of Auburn University.
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