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By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | December 24, 1994
Everybody likes the idea of saving energy costs, but even the most dedicated penny-pinchers may find their eyes glazing over when the talk turns to R values, degree-days and British thermal units.But suppose there were a simple device that you could put in your home that would monitor your heating and cooling, adjust it to fit the way you live, save energy -- and even, in some cases, save you big bucks. Suppose it was also inexpensive, easy to install, and once it's set up, utterly forgettable.
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NEWS
March 15, 2014
A Smart Meter was recently installed on my house. I was skeptical as to whether this would help me save energy. As it turns out, I think it is. I live in a house with heat pumps and programmable thermostats. I have long been leery of claims that a programmable thermostat would save me money. The theory is that if I turn down my heat at night I'll save money. The problem with this reasoning is that I have to turn the heat back up the next day, and I've always suspected that this process of reheating the house would use more energy than I saved by turning the heat down.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | February 17, 2008
My home heating bills are going up fast. What is the best way to save money on home heating? Some say it is better just to leave the thermostat at the same temperature all the time, as it costs so much to bring a cold house up to temperature. Others say to use a programmable thermostat. Still others feel you should set the thermostat down to 50 degrees at night and while at work. What do you suggest? There is no one-size-fits-all solution for keeping your home comfortable cheaply. If you want to save a significant amount on your heating bills, you could set back the thermostat to 60 degrees Fahrenheit for the entire heating season while you're awake, and then to 50 degrees when you are asleep.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | February 17, 2008
My home heating bills are going up fast. What is the best way to save money on home heating? Some say it is better just to leave the thermostat at the same temperature all the time, as it costs so much to bring a cold house up to temperature. Others say to use a programmable thermostat. Still others feel you should set the thermostat down to 50 degrees at night and while at work. What do you suggest? There is no one-size-fits-all solution for keeping your home comfortable cheaply. If you want to save a significant amount on your heating bills, you could set back the thermostat to 60 degrees Fahrenheit for the entire heating season while you're awake, and then to 50 degrees when you are asleep.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | July 24, 2005
Many parts of the country have endured brutally hot weather in recent days, and more is likely on the way as August approaches. It's important to stay cool at home, but consumers are wasting a lot of money because of misconceptions about how to do it properly. The money involved could be significant. The average U.S. household spends more than $200 a year on cooling, while hotter regions could be paying double that, according to the Alliance to Save Energy. Here are some myths that may be costing you money: Fans cool the house.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
A Smart Meter was recently installed on my house. I was skeptical as to whether this would help me save energy. As it turns out, I think it is. I live in a house with heat pumps and programmable thermostats. I have long been leery of claims that a programmable thermostat would save me money. The theory is that if I turn down my heat at night I'll save money. The problem with this reasoning is that I have to turn the heat back up the next day, and I've always suspected that this process of reheating the house would use more energy than I saved by turning the heat down.
NEWS
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,Sun Staff | October 27, 2002
If your idea of preparing your home for winter is taking out the front screen door and putting in the storm door, it's pretty obvious that you're in need of some serious advice. While no one is saying you have to build a fortress around your place to keep the cold away, there are a number of important steps that you should take to winterize your property. Mike Wixted, a Towson-based merchandising manager for Home Depot, says that if homeowners do nothing else to prepare for winter, they should do these three things: Stop cold air from getting into the home, make sure their heating system is in top-notch condition and get a programmable thermostat.
BUSINESS
By WILL MORTON and WILL MORTON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Fed up with paying nearly $500 a month for electricity and wood to heat his Joppa home, Jim Noonkester cut his heating bill in half when he installed a geothermal heat pump a decade ago. When he sold his 5,000- square-foot English Tudor house last year to buy a smaller home in Bel Air, he refused to go back to electric. "I told the Realtor, don't take me to a house unless it's got geothermal," said Noonkester, 62, a retired supermarket employee. Most people don't want to spend more than $20,000 to install geothermal systems, which use the Earth's interior heat to warm a home at about half the annual cost of oil or natural gas. But with the gulf hurricanes pushing up this year's already higher prices, the looming winter heating season takes on added urgency.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 11, 2005
Like many Marylanders, the recent heat wave sent me scurrying to the controls of the air conditioner. Early in the week, the weather switched from behaving like delightful April temperatures to a sweltering mid-August mode. I consoled myself with the thought that my home's cooling equipment was ready to spring into action. Or so I thought. A new thermostat had been hooked up to my home's central air-conditioning system. But as I got acquainted with the device, it became apparent to me that chilling out was not going to be as simple as it once was. My old thermostat had limited choices.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2007
Around the house Check out the Earth-friendly LED lights, or light-emitting diodes, which burn brighter than regular holiday lights and consume 80 percent to 90 percent less energy. Although buying a programmable thermostat may cost upward of $100, homeowners can save about 10 percent on heating and cooling bills by purchasing one. It could possibly pay for itself in only a year. The device will turn down the heat during the hours that no one is at home, and turn it back up before people return - just make sure to program it correctly.
BUSINESS
By WILL MORTON and WILL MORTON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Fed up with paying nearly $500 a month for electricity and wood to heat his Joppa home, Jim Noonkester cut his heating bill in half when he installed a geothermal heat pump a decade ago. When he sold his 5,000- square-foot English Tudor house last year to buy a smaller home in Bel Air, he refused to go back to electric. "I told the Realtor, don't take me to a house unless it's got geothermal," said Noonkester, 62, a retired supermarket employee. Most people don't want to spend more than $20,000 to install geothermal systems, which use the Earth's interior heat to warm a home at about half the annual cost of oil or natural gas. But with the gulf hurricanes pushing up this year's already higher prices, the looming winter heating season takes on added urgency.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | July 24, 2005
Many parts of the country have endured brutally hot weather in recent days, and more is likely on the way as August approaches. It's important to stay cool at home, but consumers are wasting a lot of money because of misconceptions about how to do it properly. The money involved could be significant. The average U.S. household spends more than $200 a year on cooling, while hotter regions could be paying double that, according to the Alliance to Save Energy. Here are some myths that may be costing you money: Fans cool the house.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 11, 2005
Like many Marylanders, the recent heat wave sent me scurrying to the controls of the air conditioner. Early in the week, the weather switched from behaving like delightful April temperatures to a sweltering mid-August mode. I consoled myself with the thought that my home's cooling equipment was ready to spring into action. Or so I thought. A new thermostat had been hooked up to my home's central air-conditioning system. But as I got acquainted with the device, it became apparent to me that chilling out was not going to be as simple as it once was. My old thermostat had limited choices.
NEWS
By Helen B. Jones and Helen B. Jones,Sun Staff | October 27, 2002
If your idea of preparing your home for winter is taking out the front screen door and putting in the storm door, it's pretty obvious that you're in need of some serious advice. While no one is saying you have to build a fortress around your place to keep the cold away, there are a number of important steps that you should take to winterize your property. Mike Wixted, a Towson-based merchandising manager for Home Depot, says that if homeowners do nothing else to prepare for winter, they should do these three things: Stop cold air from getting into the home, make sure their heating system is in top-notch condition and get a programmable thermostat.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | December 24, 1994
Everybody likes the idea of saving energy costs, but even the most dedicated penny-pinchers may find their eyes glazing over when the talk turns to R values, degree-days and British thermal units.But suppose there were a simple device that you could put in your home that would monitor your heating and cooling, adjust it to fit the way you live, save energy -- and even, in some cases, save you big bucks. Suppose it was also inexpensive, easy to install, and once it's set up, utterly forgettable.
NEWS
By Stephanie Tracy and Stephanie Tracy,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is offering energy-conservation tips for the winter and is encouraging its limited-income customers to take advantage of assistance offered by the company to ease the burden of increasing energy costs. Among its conservation tips, BGE suggests installing a programmable thermostat that will keep the house comfortable during the day and cooler at night and when no one is home. Changing furnace filters monthly and closing heating registers and doors in unused rooms will also help conserve energy.
NEWS
February 19, 2009
For years, you have been spending more than you should on your house, car and fancy vacations. Now the economic bubble has burst, your 401(k) is tanking, your planned early retirement is a distant memory and you have rediscovered the virtue of saving. It's an understandable move in hard times - pragmatic, reassuring and wrong. Any economist will tell you that too much saving can be just as dangerous as too much spending - it's hard to spur a limp economy back to life. What you really should do is spend in ways that will pay you real dividends and also feed the economy.
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