Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProgram For Children
IN THE NEWS

Program For Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 20, 1996
|TC Astronomer David Leisawitz will present a program about modern astronomy for children ages 6 and older from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. March 5 at the central Howard County public library.The library will accept registration starting tomorrow.Information: 313-7880.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Michael Laban Malin, a manager for a Kennedy Krieger Institute program for autistic children who was recalled for his outgoing personality, died of brain cancer Tuesday at his mother's North Baltimore home. He was 34 and lived with his family in Canton. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of David Hirsh Malin, a co-founder of the Jemicy School, and Judith Ann Malin, an administrator at St. Elizabeth's School in Northeast Baltimore. He attended the Baltimore Montessori School and was a 1998 graduate of Friends School, where he played soccer and lacrosse and sang in the school chorus.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 1999
SUMMER BRINGS changes in just about everyone's schedule, especially if you have school-age kids. If you haven't enrolled your pride and joy in a summer program, you still have time.The county Department of Recreation and Parks will be sponsoring summer activity centers again this year. Centers for children in kindergarten through sixth grade will be at George Fox Middle and Bodkin, High Point, Jacobsville, Lake Shore, Solley and Sunset elementary schools.The program runs from 8 a.m to 2: 30 p.m. on weekdays from June 28 through Aug. 6. The cost is $130.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 19, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore will launch a Montessori program, its first, at St. Pius X Catholic School in Rodgers Forge in 2011, Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien announced Wednesday. O'Brien said St. Pius X will partner with Loyola University Maryland, which has a graduate program in Montessori education. As the archdiocese describes it, the Montessori method "allows children to proceed at their own pace and focuses on all aspects of human development — intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual — to make learning an exciting process of discovery."
NEWS
August 8, 1999
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and to assist in related projects.Among them is:A Whole New World, the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Internet program for children ages 9 to 14. Volunteers are needed at the central library and several branches to teach children how to use the Internet and e-mail. Training for volunteers will be provided. Contact: Marion Hirsch, 410-396-9940.If your school or organization is seeking volunteer reading tutors and would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial, 410- 783-1800, and enter code 6130.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
The United Way of Central Maryland has awarded a $1,500 grant to support Food and Fun, a summer program for children who live in the Bishop Garth apartment complex in Westminster.The program will provide lunch and regularly scheduled activities to children in kindergarten through fifth grade."We are grateful and excited that the United Way has chosen to support this program," said the Rev. Marjorie Decker of Westminster United Methodist Church, a volunteer who helped organize the program.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
The Helping Hands Summer Program for children entering kindergarten through sixth grade will be offered from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday, July 1 to Aug. 8, at Phelps Luck Elementary School. Extended care is available.The program is designed to supplement summer school programs and recreational and day-care activities.Courses offered include language arts, mathematics, conversational Spanish for beginners, hands-on science, computer know-how, math for problem solvers, African-American history, language enrichment and sports.
NEWS
March 19, 2000
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults to improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: A Whole New World, the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Internet program for children ages 9 to 14. Volunteers are needed at several branches around the city to teach children how to use the Internet and e-mail. Training for volunteers will be provided. Contact: Marion Hirsch, 410-396-9940. Paul's Place Outreach Center, 1118 Ward St., in Baltimore's Pigtown neighborhood, for an after-school program including homework and training in life skills for children ages 10 to 13, weekdays from 2: 45 p.m. to 5: 30 p.m.; a "Kids Place" program with activities teaching values from 9: 30 a.m. to 12: 15 p.m. Saturdays for children ages 6 to 11; and "Learning Corner" adult literacy program, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
NEWS
September 21, 2008
Children's classes at the Savage branch library, 9525 Durness Lane, include "Play Partners," a 20- to 30-minute program for infants through toddlers (age 23 months) with an adult, held at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 1 through Nov. 19. Registration is not needed. "3, 2, FUN!" for ages 2 to 3 with an adult is offered at 10 a.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 7 through Nov. 18. Registration is not needed. "Picture Book Parade!" for the same age group, with an adult, will be offered at 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 7 through Nov. 18 (there will be no class Oct. 28)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
NEW YORK - It's 7:30 a.m., and Altheo Serrao's family has just arrived in Harlem from Staten Island, a two-hour journey by bus, ferry and subway. They do this every school day to be part of a program that isn't available anywhere else in New York City - or, for that matter, anywhere else in the country. Ezekiel, 8; Isaiah, 6; and Sarah, 5, are enrolled in the Harlem Children's Zone, an ambitious project that has staked out 97 blocks of Central Harlem and seeks to draft every single family into its tight network of health, parenting and educational services that extend from infancy to college.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 21, 2008
When Marin Alsop began her tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last year, she put a high priority on developing educational projects that could bring together the institution and the surrounding community, especially those parts not being reached by the orchestra. Yesterday, Alsop announced the launch of OrchKids, an after-school music program spearheaded by the BSO, in conjunction with a partnership of city organizations, and pledged $100,000 of her own money to support it. Inspired by the success of the countrywide El Sistema program in Venezuela, which provides musical training and social outlets for several hundred thousand low-income children, OrchKids will begin as a pilot program with about 25 first-graders at Harriet Tubman Elementary in West Baltimore, starting in September.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
The Columbia Association will celebrate the opening of the renovated Mini WaterPark with a party from noon to 4 p.m. May 31. The Swansfield Mini WaterPark features a 104-foot-long water slide, 1,500-square-foot SplashPad and several Funbrellas around the pool. The grand opening celebration will include music, games, food and give-aways and is open to everyone. A ribbon cutting, face painting, tug of war, moon bounce, carnival games and swimming are also planned. Each person who attends will receive a ticket for a free hot dog, snow cone, popcorn or soda.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2007
Melissa Calleri Recreation coordinator Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks Salary --$37,500 Age --27 Years on the job --Two How she got started --"It was a fluke," said Calleri, who attended Green Mountain College in Vermont. "I was there for graphic design." But after working with a friend at a nearby summer camp for children and adults with special needs, she knew she would pursue recreation as a career. Calleri graduated with a degree in therapeutic recreation. From there, she moved back to Maryland and completed her internship working with the City of Greenbelt's therapeutic recreation program.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
As House and Senate negotiators sit down this month to hammer out a compromise on renewing the popular health insurance program for children of the working poor, President Bush has made sure he gets a seat at the table. Not content with veto power alone, the Bush administration has unilaterally tightened the rules for a program Congress hopes to expand. He wants to drop thousands of children from the benefit rolls, including 3,700 in Maryland. If lawmakers fail to reach agreement before the State Children's Health Insurance Program is set to expire Sept.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | July 1, 2007
In February, when Tracy Feld, owner of the Howard County KidzArt franchise, approached Alison Gunner about holding classes at Harmony Hall, the activities coordinator was skeptical. Residents of the assisted-living center are elderly and suffer from dementia, and it was hard for Gunner to imagine them staying focused long enough to benefit from art instruction. She also wondered whether an art program designed for children would be suitable for her clients, she recalled.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.