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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, contending that he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs. Brandon Jenkins, who is being represented by the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice, said in the lawsuit that when asked what was most important to him during an interview with CCBC officials as part of the application process last spring, he responded: "My God. " Shortly afterward, he was denied admission into the radiation therapy program, and he asked the program coordinator for an explanation in an email.
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NEWS
August 3, 2005
Paul B. Wolfe, a microbiologist and program director at the National Institutes of Health, died of esophageal cancer Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Catonsville resident was 54. The Cleveland native earned his doctorate in microbiology from the Johns Hopkins University in 1981. After running a medical research laboratory in downtown Baltimore, he joined the NIH in Bethesda and was program director of grants at his death. "He was shy and stoic, and had his own sense of humor with a charming dignity," said his oldest son, Christian James Wolfe, an actuary for a federal agency.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Monsignor Roland Pierre Bordelon, a retired Catholic Relief Services director, died of dementia Dec. 18 at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Vernon resident was 87. Born in Bordelonville, La., he was the son of Russell and Lillian Dupuis Bordelon. Family members said his hometown was named for an ancestor, a French captain who came to America with the Marquis de Lafayette during the Revolutionary War. He was ordained a priest in 1950 and joined Catholic Relief Services a decade later.
NEWS
December 12, 2002
Francis T. Hoban Sr., retired NASA program director, research professor and director of George Mason University's Continuing Career Program, died of heart failure Dec. 5 at Gettysburg Hospital in Pennsylvania. He was 67 and lived in Taneytown. Mr. Hoban was born and raised in Eastern Pennsylvania. After graduation from Minersville High School there, he enlisted in the Army and served with the 11th and 82nd Airborne Divisions stateside and in Europe. He earned his bachelor's degree from St. Louis University in 1960 and a master's degree from George Washington University.
NEWS
March 15, 2006
Dorothy B. G. George, former director of youth development programs for the old Baltimore Urban Services Agency, died of pancreatic cancer March 4 at Catonsville Commons Nursing Home. She was 77. She was born and raised Dorothy Belle Gibbs in New Bern, N.C., and earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1951 from what is now Morgan State University in 1951. Mrs. George moved to the Virgin Islands and became a welfare caseworker. After returning to Baltimore in the mid-1950s, she became an adoption caseworker for the Baltimore Department of Social Services.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
A prospective student at the Community College of Baltimore County sued school officials in federal court this week, contending that he was denied admission to an academic program based on an expression of his religious beliefs. Brandon Jenkins, who is being represented by the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice, said in the lawsuit that when asked what was most important to him during an interview with CCBC officials as part of the application process last spring, he responded: "My God. " Shortly afterward, he was denied admission into the radiation therapy program, and he asked the program coordinator for an explanation in an email.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Jean Gartlan, a retired journalist and a Catholic Relief Services program director who worked in 1960s refugee relief in southern Africa, died of cancer Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88 and lived in Mount Vernon. "She was really a Renaissance woman," said Ken Hackett, former Catholic Relief Services president. "She was literary and traveled the world. She did some remarkable behind-the-scenes things, and ... you never knew she was there. " Born in New York City and raised in Washington Heights, she earned an English degree at the College of Mount St. Vincent and a second bachelor's degree, in journalism, from Columbia University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
WBAL radio Monday named Merrie Street as news director replacing Mark Miller, who resigned last month. Street, whose resume includes news director and anchor duties at WLIF and WPOC, starts Monday, according to an email from Ed Kiernan, station general manager. "I have to say I was really impressed with her," Kiernan said in a follow-up telephone interview. "WBAL is one of the premier news organizations in the country," Street said in a telephone interview Monday. "This is just a great opportunity and I look so forward to it. " In addition to her career in radio, Street has also been involved in politics running for such offices as Harford County register of wills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Dave Hill program director at 98 Rock, said Thursday afternoon that the station had “parted ways” with afternoon disc jockey Stephen G. Smith, known to listeners as Stash. Smith has not been on the air since an automobile accident in Harford County Sunday that sent five people to the hospital for treatment of minor injuries and resulted in 48-year-old disc jockey being charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, negligent driving and other traffic offenses, according to police.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Pamela Audrey Hall, a former radio station program director who was active nationally in jazz and contemporary gospel music circles, died of cancer Jan. 21 at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 57 and lived in Ellicott City. She was named Black Radio's Music Director of the Year in 1992. Billboard Magazine also nominated her as music director of the year. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Dr. William Martin Hall, a gynecologist at Sinai Hospital and the old Lutheran and Provident hospitals, who was a founder of the Garwyn Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
The campaign to change the name of Wasington's professional football team will be coming to Baltimore in a "small" way Friday via ads on WBAL radio. WBAL progran director Dave Hill confirmed that Oneida Indian Nation has bought advertising time on the Baltimore radio station to advance its effort to change the name of the Washington Redskins. "We are carrying the ads on WBAL," Hill said in an email response.  "It is a small buy and is not during any Ravens programming. " It was incorrectly reported on at least one national sports website that the ads were running on Thanksgiving.
BUSINESS
The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Amy Michelle Gross has been appointed to replace Robert W. Schaefer as executive director of the France-Merrick Foundation, the Baltimore-based charity announced Tuesday. Schaefer is retiring after 17 years leading the area's fourth largest charitable organization with more than $200 million in assets. Established in 1959, the foundation is charged with improving Baltimore's quality of life. "It is a bittersweet time for our foundation," said Wally Pinkard, president of the France-Merrick Foundation, in a statement.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Inside a classroom at Howard Community College's new health sciences building are computerized mannequin patients, a replica ambulance and other devices that place students in simulated life-and-death situations. The facilities are part of the school's emergency medical service/paramedic program, which trains students to respond to the situations they'll face on emergency calls. But for Cory Boone and Nick Frazier, there's nothing like the real thing. They would know. Early this year, the Ellicott City residents, both students in the program, applied the skills they learned in class and while volunteering with the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue to assist victims of cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By Nicholas DiPasquale | February 24, 2013
For 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay Program - a partnership including the six bay states, the District of Columbia, the Chesapeake Bay Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies - has been measuring and assessing the bay's health and working to restore the ecosystem. In many of those years, the health findings were troubling. This year, as we release our annual Bay Barometer summarizing the bay's condition and our restoration progress, there remain many results related to water quality that reinforce our need for continued action.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2013
Dr. Clifford H. Turen, an internationally know traumatologist and former chief of orthopedics who had worked at Maryland Shock Trauma Center for two decades, was killed Jan. 13 when the private single-engine plane he was flying crashed in dense fog into trees east of Dover, Del. The Clarksville resident was 55. According to published news reports, Dr. Turen was en route from Sandersville, Ga., to Summit Airport in Middletown, Del., in his...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
The campaign to change the name of Wasington's professional football team will be coming to Baltimore in a "small" way Friday via ads on WBAL radio. WBAL progran director Dave Hill confirmed that Oneida Indian Nation has bought advertising time on the Baltimore radio station to advance its effort to change the name of the Washington Redskins. "We are carrying the ads on WBAL," Hill said in an email response.  "It is a small buy and is not during any Ravens programming. " It was incorrectly reported on at least one national sports website that the ads were running on Thanksgiving.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
An article in Tuesday's Sun incorrectly reported that renovations costing $165,000 to the Basilica of the Assumption were made in preparation for Pope John Paul II's visit Oct. 8. According to the Rev. Michael White, program director for the papal visit, the maintenance and renewal projects had been long planned and were not related to the visit.The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Dave Hill program director at 98 Rock, said Thursday afternoon that the station had “parted ways” with afternoon disc jockey Stephen G. Smith, known to listeners as Stash. Smith has not been on the air since an automobile accident in Harford County Sunday that sent five people to the hospital for treatment of minor injuries and resulted in 48-year-old disc jockey being charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, negligent driving and other traffic offenses, according to police.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2012
A job at the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation comes with a truly unique annual benefit, one that turns employees into grant givers. Its 16 eligible employees will each award a $10,000 grant to the nonprofit of their choice. The staff members will announce their selections and reasons for the choice at the sixth annual Employee Giving Program luncheon Tuesday at the Hotel Monaco on North Charles Street. Ivy West, a program director assistant, calls the gift "a supreme benefit" of her job and an awesome responsibility "to step into somebody's life and help them.
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