Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrognosis
IN THE NEWS

Prognosis

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | June 28, 2012
The last play Stephen Banick made ended with the freshman attackman writhing on the turf at Sea Gull Stadium in the fourth quarter of Stevenson's eventual 7-2 loss to Salisbury in an NCAA tournament semifinal on May 20. Banick, who led the Mustangs in goals (36) and points (63), crumpled to the turf with 12:31 left in regulation after planting his left leg behind the cage and had to be carried off the field with the lower portion of that leg immobilized in a cast. As traumatic as that scene was, coach Paul Cantabene said Banick could return to the field as early as this fall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | June 24, 2012
If he's doing his job, an NFL official will largely go unnoticed. He will make sure the rules are followed, of course, yet blend into the background as much as possible. Tony Corrente is anything but invisible. The longtime NFL referee learned that as he battled throat cancer last fall, a football season that was the worst - and somehow the best - of his life. "I've got big boxes filled with letters, cards and trinkets people sent me," said Corrente, 60, a retired high school teacher from La Mirada, Calif., who has worked NFL games since 1995 and doubles as the officiating coordinator for the Pac-12 Conference.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | June 28, 2012
The last play Stephen Banick made ended with the freshman attackman writhing on the turf at Sea Gull Stadium in the fourth quarter of Stevenson's eventual 7-2 loss to Salisbury in an NCAA tournament semifinal on May 20. Banick, who led the Mustangs in goals (36) and points (63), crumpled to the turf with 12:31 left in regulation after planting his left leg behind the cage and had to be carried off the field with the lower portion of that leg immobilized in a cast. As traumatic as that scene was, coach Paul Cantabene said Banick could return to the field as early as this fall.
NEWS
By Mark Pazniokas and Mark Pazniokas,HARTFORD COURANT | December 28, 2004
HARTFORD, Conn. - Gov. M. Jodi Rell underwent a mastectomy and reconstructive surgery yesterday at Danbury Hospital, less than a week after previously undisclosed tests confirmed breast cancer. Because the cancer was detected early and had not spread to her lymph nodes, the governor is not expected to need radiation or chemotherapy, said a spokesman, Rich Harris. "Doctors say the procedure went very well, and she is resting comfortably," Harris said. Rell, 58, intends to leave the hospital tomorrow and return to the Capitol next week to deliver the State of the State address when the General Assembly opens its 2005 session Jan. 5. The disclosure of her illness and surgery was a jarring coda to a tumultuous year in which her predecessor, John G. Rowland, resigned in July in the face of an impeachment inquiry, then pleaded guilty Thursday to a federal tax charge.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | September 14, 2008
Matt Cassel, Patriots Replaces: Tom Brady (knee) Faces: Jets at Meadowlands Prognosis: Let the rest of the AFC East gloat. If Cassel couldn't play, the Patriots would have dumped him already. He won't produce Brady-like plays, but the former Southern California quarterback will be competent. Kerry Collins, Titans Replaces: Vince Young (knee) Faces: Bengals in Cincinnati Prognosis: If it wasn't Young's knee, it would be his head that sent him to the sideline. Collins won't run like Young, but he'll pass better.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
POTOMAC -- With sparse crowds and a low-profile leader board, the Booz Allen Classic is living up, or down, to its pre-tournament prognosis of an event on its last, shaky legs. But those with a chance to win will be carrying some pretty good story lines, not to mention recent struggles, into the weekend at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel. Booz Allen Classic Through tomorrow; TPC at Avenel, Potomac; daily tickets start at $40 TV: 3 p.m., chs. 2, 7
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
At this time of year, predicting whether or not a team will overcome its flaws and bully its way into the NCAA men's basketball tournament is kind of like making a medical diagnosis. You can have all the information at your fingertips, and still, at best, you're making an educated guess. The mysteries of modern medicine and the mysteries of men's basketball don't always follow a predictable pattern. Some hopes die for inexplicable reasons while others miraculously live on. Still, with conference tournaments set to begin, we decided to put on our stethoscope, listen closely for a heartbeat and give you our best diagnosis of the teams in the area.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
PSINet Inc., the Internet company that bought naming rights to Baltimore's football stadium in 1999 when the Ravens were desperate for cash, now finds itself in even more dire straits. The company, based in Ashburn, Va., announced the sale Tuesday of a profitable credit-card transaction business for $300 million and a systems maintenance company for an undisclosed price. In spite of those deals, the company acknowledges that it will need to renegotiate or restructure its debt to survive.
NEWS
July 12, 2007
As the latest nominee for surgeon general prepares to face a Senate committee today, it's hard to know which is in worse condition: Dr. James Holsinger's prospects for confirmation or the future of the job itself. Dr. Holsinger arrives with the baggage of some controversial positions on homosexuality and stem cell research that have alienated interest groups on the left and the right. And he's coming days after his predecessor, Richard H. Carmona, gave Congress an outraged account of how the Bush White House muzzled his views on such critical issues as mental health and secondhand smoke, forcing him instead to address medical topics from a politically censored script.
HEALTH
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | June 24, 2012
If he's doing his job, an NFL official will largely go unnoticed. He will make sure the rules are followed, of course, yet blend into the background as much as possible. Tony Corrente is anything but invisible. The longtime NFL referee learned that as he battled throat cancer last fall, a football season that was the worst - and somehow the best - of his life. "I've got big boxes filled with letters, cards and trinkets people sent me," said Corrente, 60, a retired high school teacher from La Mirada, Calif., who has worked NFL games since 1995 and doubles as the officiating coordinator for the Pac-12 Conference.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | dan.connolly@baltsun.com | April 10, 2010
As Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts attempted to come back from a herniated disk in his back this spring, he said his final test would be stealing a base and emerging 100 percent. He has stolen two in two games this week and hurt himself on each attempt, including Friday, when he didn't return after the first inning because of an abdominal strain. He slid headfirst into second, later scored the Orioles' first run in their 7-6 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays and then didn't return to the field in the top of the second.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
The chairman of a commission charged with awarding Maryland's five casino licenses said Tuesday that "there's more optimism" these days for a gambling-related windfall to state coffers despite a recession and lackluster initial interest from the private sector. Donald C. Fry, a former Harford County delegate who heads the politically appointed panel, said he based his hopeful prognosis on new expectations that a full-scale casino will come to downtown Baltimore and on preliminary feedback from consultants hired to advise the commission.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
John Harbaugh said his team will improve next season and it will have nothing to do with free agency or the draft. The Ravens coach is looking at the return of such injured starters as nose tackle Kelly Gregg, guard Marshal Yanda and safety Dawan Landry to help the team take the next step to the Super Bowl. In research compiled by The Dallas Morning News, the Ravens won 11 games and earned a playoff berth despite their starters missing the equivalent of 64 games to injuries. That was the fourth-highest total in the NFL and first among teams in the postseason.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Edward Lee and Ken Murray and Edward Lee,ken.murray@baltsun.com and edward.lee@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
Ravens cornerback Samari Rolle appears doubtful for tomorrow night's AFC championship game in Pittsburgh after missing his third straight practice of the week with an unspecified groin injury. Reserve cornerback Frank Walker said he hasn't been told he will start in place of Rolle against the Steelers, "but it's looking like that." "We're hoping that Samari can get back, but if not, I'll be stepping in for Samari," Walker said. Rolle injured his groin late in the second half of last week's game against the Tennessee Titans and did not return.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | September 14, 2008
Matt Cassel, Patriots Replaces: Tom Brady (knee) Faces: Jets at Meadowlands Prognosis: Let the rest of the AFC East gloat. If Cassel couldn't play, the Patriots would have dumped him already. He won't produce Brady-like plays, but the former Southern California quarterback will be competent. Kerry Collins, Titans Replaces: Vince Young (knee) Faces: Bengals in Cincinnati Prognosis: If it wasn't Young's knee, it would be his head that sent him to the sideline. Collins won't run like Young, but he'll pass better.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
The chairman of a commission charged with awarding Maryland's five casino licenses said Tuesday that "there's more optimism" these days for a gambling-related windfall to state coffers despite a recession and lackluster initial interest from the private sector. Donald C. Fry, a former Harford County delegate who heads the politically appointed panel, said he based his hopeful prognosis on new expectations that a full-scale casino will come to downtown Baltimore and on preliminary feedback from consultants hired to advise the commission.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 16, 1991
Whoever put the canned laughter in the first two episodes of "STAT," the new ABC sitcom, should have his or her hearing checked. The laugh track slobbers all over the actors' lines, getting in the way of what might be pretty funny stuff -- if we could hear it.Outside of that large lapse of sensibility and judgment, the latest comedy from Danny Arnold, the creator of "Barney Miller," is both sweet and irreverent, an Arnold trademark.The series -- about life in the emergency room of a big city hospital -- premieres at 9:30 tonight on WJZ-TV (Channel 13)
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
At this time of year, predicting whether or not a team will overcome its flaws and bully its way into the NCAA men's basketball tournament is kind of like making a medical diagnosis. You can have all the information at your fingertips, and still, at best, you're making an educated guess. The mysteries of modern medicine and the mysteries of men's basketball don't always follow a predictable pattern. Some hopes die for inexplicable reasons while others miraculously live on. Still, with conference tournaments set to begin, we decided to put on our stethoscope, listen closely for a heartbeat and give you our best diagnosis of the teams in the area.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2007
Surgery to repair Ravens quarterback Steve McNair's partially torn rotator cuff went well yesterday with no complications, coach Brian Billick said. McNair partially dislocated his left, nonthrowing shoulder and tore the rotator cuff in the team's loss to the Cincinnati Bengals on Nov. 11. The Ravens placed McNair on injured reserve just hours before Monday night's 27-24 loss to the New England Patriots. "[The surgery] was needed," Billick said after practice yesterday. "There was some ... labrum [damage]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.