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Profit Margins

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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Profit margins at Maryland hospitals slipped again last year, the fourth straight year of decline, according to figures released yesterday by the Maryland Hospital Association. Operating margins for the hospitals as a group, though tight, gained slightly in 2000, to 1.1 percent from 0.9 percent in 1999, according to the MHA. But total margins - including nonhospital items such as investment income - dipped to 2.4 percent from 2.5 percent in 1999. The profit squeeze prompted the MHA earlier this month to say that it would seek a larger than planned rate increase for the fiscal year beginning in July.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
Potential bidders for the license to run the slots casino proposed for Baltimore say the deal the state and city are offering would make it nearly impossible to make a profit. When state officials unveiled the terms late last month, they touted incentives that they said would draw more applicants to build and operate the casino — and prevent a repeat of the debacle that occurred the last time they sought an operator. But as the deadline for applications draws closer, some say the incentives are outweighed by the costs — including the rent they would have to pay the city for the site.
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NEWS
By Thomas A. Firey | April 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - The public won't pay much attention to one of the General Assembly's most consequential, long-running and disheartening political games: the ever-tightening restrictions on consumer choices in order to increase profit margins for politically favored businesses. The game works like this: A politically favored business group becomes worried that an innovative new competitor might open shop and offer consumers lower prices, better selection, higher quality or greater convenience.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 30, 2008
To understand the intense economic pressures sweeping the globe, you could earn a master's in business administration or convene a focus group of economists and Fortune 500 CEOs. Or you could look at McCormick & Co. The spice purveyor illustrates just about every kind of contemporary economic trauma: soaring crop prices, expensive energy, depressed consumers, inflation, tighter profit margins, layoffs, gyrating currency values and nutty credit markets. The Sparks-based company has coped very well, partly by raising prices and contributing to the nation's 4 percent-plus inflation rate.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 21, 1994
Despite falling profit margins in its industrial business and a drop in Mexican sales, McCormick & Co. Inc. boosted profits by 8.5 percent in its fiscal third quarter with increased retail sales in the United States and Europe."
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Net earnings were down 3.9 percent but profit margins were up as Lockheed Martin Corp. reported its third straight quarter of unspectacular financial results yesterday.The Bethesda-based defense and aerospace company posted $318 million in net earnings on sales of $6.3 billion for the third quarter, down from earnings of $331 million on $6.6 billion in sales for the same portion of last year.Thanks to healthier profit margins and less outstanding stock, though, fully diluted earnings per share rose to $1.67 from the $1.51 reported for last year's third quarter.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
In what could be its last financial report as an independent company, Giant Food Inc. said yesterday that higher profit margins and lower costs boosted first-quarter profits by 34 percent.For the 12-week period that ended May 23, Landover-based Giant reported net income of $19.9 million, up from $14.9 million in the year-ago period. Earnings per share increased 32 percent, from 25 cents to 33 cents."They were just slightly ahead of our expectations," said Kurt Funderburg, a Baltimore-based analyst for Ferris Baker Watts.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman, Milton Kent, Don Markus and Peter Schmuck | October 5, 1993
PETER G. ANGELOSAge: 63Residence: BaltimoreOccupation: Attorney.Why he's involved: He's a keen supporter of local ownership, and began thinking seriously about buying the Orioles when Eli S. Jacobs' financial problems became public last year. Early partners in the bid were novelist Tom Clancy and local contractor Henry J. Knott Sr.Baseball goals: "In any given year, you can't set out and say you're going to win the championship. You've got to be realistic. But winning that title is always the goal."
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
The Ryland Group Inc., continuing a financial turnaround, yesterday reported that its third-quarter net profit climbed 36 percent.The Columbia-based homebuilder attributed the increase in net income -- to $9.2 million, or 61 cents a share, from $6.7 million, or 42 cents a share -- primarily to improved sales in new communities, higher profit margins, lower interest rates and the effectiveness of its land-buying and new-product strategies.Ryland's revenue in the quarter was $462.2 million, a 10 percent gain from last year.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 1, 1994
The Kmart Corp. decided to clean house in the fourth quarter, writing off losses on two specialty store chains it sold and taking a big charge for renovations and other improvements in an effort to make its core discount-store business competitive.As a result, it reported a loss yesterday of $1.19 billion, or $2.61 a share.But analysts said that even without the string of one-time charges, Kmart's fourth-quarter results were disappointing. The retailer's sales growth was good but failed to translate into tTC better earnings, in part because of heavier than expected markdowns.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | September 6, 2006
Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank is scheduled to profile his company this afternoon at the Goldman Sachs retailing conference in New York, and the assembled investors will probably harp about profit margins. Margins - sales minus costs expressed as a percentage of sales - are the obsession of Under Armour analysts and seemingly the Achilles heel in Under Armour's armor. After one margin measure slipped 2 percentage points in the second-quarter report, the Baltimore company's stock went from $40 to $33 in two weeks.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | August 27, 2006
Is the ethanol boom about to run out of gas? Investors might want to consider the possibility. A recent shortage of the corn-derived gasoline additive, combined with record-high oil prices, has had refiners snapping up every gallon of ethanol they can get their hands on. In the process, they have bid ethanol prices up to record levels. Wowed by the substantial profits ethanol-makers are hauling in, Wall Street has been joyfully throwing money at companies that produce ethanol in a style that recalls the heyday of the dot-com era. The shares of industry leader Archer Daniels Midland Co. have nearly doubled over the past 12 months as investors cheer the surging profit in the company's ethanol segment.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | August 25, 2006
At the New Arts Foundry in Hampden, workers still follow the centuries-old process of casting bronze sculptures from molds of wax, rubber and ceramic. But owner Gary Siegel fears the business has irrevocably changed in a matter of months. Last year at this time, Siegel said, he was paying $1.60 a pound for the bronze alloy he uses, which is 95 percent copper. By May, it was $4.50 a pound - nearly triple what he had been paying. Metals prices have soared in the past year, and it's not only affecting foundries that make bronze sculptures, but manufacturers of products from power tools to tap shoes.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Squeezed by a slowing housing market and the rising cost for raw materials, Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. posted second-quarter results yesterday that missed forecasts and said earnings for the rest of the year will be lower than expected. Shares of Black & Decker fell to a 52-week low, shedding $5.22, or 6.8 percent, to $71.15. Earlier, shares were down nearly 10 percent. The nation's largest power tools maker reported slightly higher profit for the three months that ended June 30, thanks to manufacturing efficiencies, on flat sales.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
The company thought it had given investors all they could ask for: a nice bump in profits, better-than-expected sales of a key new product and an improved financial outlook for the rest of the year. But in the end, Under Armour's positives were overshadowed yesterday by investors' focus on slightly lower profit margins over the previous three-month period. It was another illustration of a lesson the Baltimore athletic-apparel company has learned since going public last year: An entrepreneurial spirit doesn't always mesh with the critical eye of Wall Street.
NEWS
By STACEY HIRSH AND ANDREA K. WALKER and STACEY HIRSH AND ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTERS | April 26, 2006
Each morning as Jeff Dolch drives down Ritchie Highway to get from his home in Arnold to the BP Amoco gasoline station he owns at St. Paul Street and Mount Royal Avenue in Baltimore, he pays close attention to the gas prices along the way. If they are different than during his commute the night before, Dolch knows his first order of business is checking whether his own prices must change. Before he makes a cup of coffee, Dolch checks an Internet site to see how much his distributor is charging for gasoline that day. Owners like Dolch then decide how much to charge their customers based on that figure and other factors, such as their competitors' prices, when their next shipment of gas is due and how much it will cost them to buy it. Gasoline prices are determined by a sequence of events that starts at the futures markets, as men and women on the trading floor yell and wave slips of paper in their hands, and ends in customers' wallets.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
Ryland Group Inc. reported sharply higher second-quarter earnings yesterday, reflecting a new strategy of concentrating on profit margins rather than volume.The Columbia-based homebuilder and finance company said consolidated earnings rose to $5.4 million, or 31 cents per share, compared with a loss of nearly $1 million, or 9 cents per share, in its continuing operations during the same period last year.For the first half of the year, consolidated earnings grew to $6.4 million, or 34 cents per share, after suffering a loss of $2.4 million, or 22 cents per share, from continuing operations in last year's first half.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc. reported yesterday that its earnings more than doubled in the first three months of this year to $10.1 million, on the strength of the largest quarterly sales volume in the company's 32-year history.The Columbia homebuilder's first-quarter profit rose to 67 cents per share vs. 30 cents per share in the comparable period a year ago.With the positive results, Ryland's board opted to extend the contract of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer R. Chad Dreier through at least 2003.
BUSINESS
By JOHN SCHMELTZER | January 31, 2006
CHICAGO -- Preparing for the day when it again will be an independent company, Kraft Foods Inc. announced yesterday that it would cut 8,000 more workers and close 20 more factories around the world. The cuts, which follow the 5,500 layoffs and 19 factory closings last year, are coming as the nation's largest food maker battles higher costs for ingredients and stiffer competition from generic store brands that have become more appealing to consumers watching their budgets. The manufacturer of Kraft cheese, Oscar Mayer hotdogs and Oreo cookies said it hoped the new cuts would help it save $750 million a year - in addition to the $450 million from earlier cuts.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2005
Farooq Zahid got the e-mail sometime after supper Tuesday night from his gasoline supplier, went to the BP station that he owns in Anne Arundel County to receive a new shipment and changed the numbers on the billboard sign at midnight. Then he braced himself. The sign read $3.18 for a gallon of regular. "This is a crazy business," Zahid said yesterday morning. "One lady called and cursed me out. Even my regular customers, those who came, they didn't say anything, but I felt it." While the average price of regular gasoline in Maryland was $2.66 a gallon yesterday, according to the AAA motor club, dozens of gas stations around Maryland and other states cracked $3 a gallon, up from just a handful across the nation earlier in the week.
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