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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Medifast Inc., an Owings Mills-based company specializing in weight loss programs, reported sharply higher revenue and profit in the first quarter. The company had profit of $4.9 million, or 33 cents per share, compard to $2.5 million, or 17 cents per share, in the year-ago quarter. Net revenue rose nearly 75 percent, from $35 million in the first quarter last year to $61 million this quarter. The company said it has 45 corporate and franchised weight-control centers, and plans to open another 13 to 15 new centers this year.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
McCormick & Co. Inc. saw increases in third-quarter sales and profits, led by greater demand from consumers in China and growth in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, the Sparks-based spice maker said Thursday. Income jumped 18 percent to $122.9 million, or 94 cents per share, in the three months ending Aug. 31, compared with $104.4 million, or 78 cents per share, a year earlier, helped by a lower tax rate. McCormick's sales rose 3 percent to $1.04 billion, the company said. The results sent shares of McCormick up nearly 3 percent on the New York Stock Exchange to close at $67.50 each.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Columbia-based MICROS Systems Inc., a provider of technology solutions for the hospitality industry, announced on Thursday that it had a $43.2 million profit in the third quarter and planned to buy a company in England. MICROS' net income rose $4.7 million in the quarter ended March 31 over the third quarter last year. On a per-share basis, the company earned 53 cents, a 6-cent increase from the year before. Revenue for the quarter reached $278 million, up nearly 10 percent from a year ago. The company also announced that it had signed an agreement to buy Torex Retail Holdings Ltd., in Dunstable, England, from two private equity firms.
NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
In his recent op-ed, Professor James Burdick of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine writes that the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the ACA was a step toward universal care for all ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). However, I find this assertion ironic because we are now further entrenched in a market system that does not embrace the idea of health care as a right. Dr. Burdick claims the inevitability of universal care, stating that partisan arguments will have to subside and that ultimately, the ACA reduces costs through cutting over-utilization.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. reported a first-quarter profit Wednesday, a turnaround from a first-quarter loss in 2009, as sales of television advertising improved. Sinclair, owner or programmer of 58 TV stations including Fox 45 in Baltimore, said it earned net income of $11.5 million, or 14 cents per share, in the three months that ended March 31. The broadcaster had posted a loss of $85.7 million, or $1.06 per share, in the first three months of 2009, largely due to an after-tax, $100.
NEWS
February 14, 2010
It's disappointing to hear so much rhetoric coming from members of the development community and some local politicians over new storm water rules in Maryland ("A threat to Smart Growth" Feb. 2). The plain truth is that developers appreciate a clean and healthy Chesapeake Bay when they can build waterfront homes or other development projects with real estate values boosted by water views. But when saving the bay requires them (and everyone else, by the way) to do more to protect it, they threaten to retreat to the sprawling suburbs again.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
MICROS Systems Inc., a Columbia-based provider of software for the hospitality industry, reported Thursday its profit in the fourth quarter rose 16 percent on higher sales revenues. The company, which makes point-of-sale software for hotels, restaurants and retailers, said its revenues climbed more than 10 percent, or $28.4 million, to $303 million in the quarter ending June 30. The higher revenues helped the company earn a profit of $48 million — an increase of $6.7 million, or 16 percent, over the similar period last year.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Driven by solid sales, improving margins and another quarterly profit, McCormick & Co. has raised its earnings guidance for the year. The Sparks-based spice maker announced Thursday that its yearly outlook will be a range of $2.67 per share to $2.71 per share, up from a previous guidance of $2.49 per share to $2.54 per share. The company reported a 36 percent increase in fiscal third-quarter profit. Net income for three months ending Aug. 31 was $102.4 million, or 76 cents per share, compared with $75.1 million, or 57 cents per share, in the corresponding period last year.
EXPLORE
September 30, 2013
Whether it's making gourmet jams or jellies, baking bread and cakes, catering festive events or creating and packaging special dinners for one, food related businesses are becoming increasingly popular as a way to earn a living (or to add to your income). The cook's creative flair, combined with business practicality, will succeed even in tough economic times, if the enterprise is given the appropriate research and planning before its launch. University of Maryland Extension's Food for Profit workshop takes its "students" step by step through the information necessary to start and run a small food product business.
NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | August 14, 2014
In the switch to "smart meters," BGE is inconveniencing its customers for something they probably don't even want and is somewhat suspect, anyway: Just imagine the information BGE will be able to glean from real-time utility usage data available with smart meters. It will likely be possible for the company to not only deduce the number of people living in your house, but also when they go to work, return home, eat, watch TV, go to bed and so on, because all of these activities involve turning on and off appliances of various kinds and using more or less electricity.
TRAVEL
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
A 12-foot tiger shark may have slipped past locals, but it made an appearance in Ocean City over the weekend according to a non-profit that studies sharks. Septima a 1,000-pound, 12-foot-8-inch female shark tagged by researchers at Ocearch surfaced twice in the Isle of Wight Bay, which empties into the Atlantic at the inlet, between 2:29 and 3:10 p.m. on Aug. 1, according to tracking equipment managed by the non-profit. Ocearch tagged the mature shark on May 30 this year and has tracked its movements since, with pings along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to the New Jersey area, where it was last recorded on Monday afternoon.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
A Major League Baseball panel's recent decision would rewrite the economics of the relationship between the Orioles and Washington Nationals, diverting tens of millions of dollars in annual profits from the regional television network that primarily benefit the Baltimore team, according to baseball sources. The private decision, made by three club owners selected by Commissioner Bud Selig, would diminish the amount of money the Orioles receive under a 2005 agreement establishing how money from Mid-Atlantic Sports Network is to be divided by the neighboring teams.
NEWS
By Kat Hyland | July 14, 2014
How competent is your 18-year old? Do you trust him or her with your credit card? How about the brand new family car? Better yet, do you think he is competent enough to take out several thousands of dollars of debt with a few pen strokes? Education has long enjoyed a prominent status as the keystone in the archway to American success. What supports this idea is the concept that the barriers to higher education are surmountable, and that people who cannot afford to pay for school out of pocket can borrow money as an investment toward their future.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In recognizing that for-profit corporations like Hobby Lobby can hold religious beliefs that trump secular laws like the Affordable Care Act's requirement that women have access to contraceptives without out-of-pocket costs, the Supreme Court has moved the nation in an unwelcome direction. Differentiating between religious organizations and private companies used to be a straightforward matter (and a practice dating back to English common law), but now that distinction is no longer so clear.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
NEWS
March 28, 2010
Maryland could be the first state in the nation to allow a new class of "for-benefit" corporations if a measure before the House of Delegates receives final approval. The designation, which has already been approved in the Senate, would allow the director of a company to weigh community, environmental and societal factors when making determining the "best interest" of the company. "It is evolving as a national movement," said Del. Brian J. Feldman, a Montgomery County Democrat, during a Saturday debate on the measure.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
I am writing in response to the letter written by Randall Miller in which he questioned why we went to war in Iraq and Afghanistan ( "Why did we go to war?" May 28). Perhaps the answer can be found in Major General Smedley Butler's book, "War is a Racket. " The military-industrial complex President Dwight Eisenhower warned about is thriving, and the cost is thousands of lives lost in two unnecessary wars. Tragically, we have no reason to hope there won't be another unnecessary war in the future as Republicans demand military intervention in response to any type of conflict in any country in the world.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
I am writing in response to the letter written by Randall Miller in which he questioned why we went to war in Iraq and Afghanistan ( "Why did we go to war?" May 28). Perhaps the answer can be found in Major General Smedley Butler's book, "War is a Racket. " The military-industrial complex President Dwight Eisenhower warned about is thriving, and the cost is thousands of lives lost in two unnecessary wars. Tragically, we have no reason to hope there won't be another unnecessary war in the future as Republicans demand military intervention in response to any type of conflict in any country in the world.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Under Armour has agreed to a multi-year partnership with Fight For Children, a non-profit working to improve early childhood and K-12 education. The Baltimore-based sports apparel brand said Tuesday it will serve as the presenting sponsor of the group's annual Fight Night fundraising event, now in its 25 t h year. The Washington fund-raiser attracts 2,000 attendees from business, government, entertainment and community service for a night of entertainment and professional boxing.
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