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By Aaron Oster | April 13, 2014
I spent most of this week thinking about what I wanted to say in this column. But then I realized I honestly couldn't say anything better than what the Ultimate Warrior said in his final appearance on WWE Raw on Monday, just 24 hours before his death. For those who didn't see the show, or don't remember the words, here's what he said: “No WWE talent becomes a legend on their own. Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breathe their final breath. And if what that man did in his life makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them bleed deeper, than something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory of those who honor him and make the running the man did live forever.
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By Aaron Oster | April 13, 2014
I spent most of this week thinking about what I wanted to say in this column. But then I realized I honestly couldn't say anything better than what the Ultimate Warrior said in his final appearance on WWE Raw on Monday, just 24 hours before his death. For those who didn't see the show, or don't remember the words, here's what he said: “No WWE talent becomes a legend on their own. Every man's heart one day beats its final beat, his lungs breathe their final breath. And if what that man did in his life makes the blood pulse through the body of others, and makes them bleed deeper, than something larger than life, then his essence, his spirit, will be immortalized by the storytellers, by the loyalty, by the memory of those who honor him and make the running the man did live forever.
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By THOM LOVERRO | August 11, 1991
Professional wrestling has lost its credibility.That premise may sound ludicrous, but it was the conclusion I -- along with several patrons of a local bar -- came to after talking about the glory days of wrestling.We talked about Cowboy Bill Watts, and I told them how I once saw him fight Bruno Sammartino for the world championship in the old Madison Square Garden, sharing a truly nostalgic memory that only another wrestling fan could appreciate.We spent some time reminiscing about others wrestlers who found a place in the hearts and mind of our youth -- Killer Kowalski, who once tore the ear off Yukon Eric in match; Dick the Bruiser, who fought Alex Karras in a bar the night before they were to meet in the ring; the Sheik, the mysterious Arab who shot fire out of his fingers; and Wild Red Berry, the cane-wielding manager who wore a jacket with the words on the back "I Am Right!"
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | March 30, 2014
The final member of the 2014 WWE Hall of Fame class was announced last week, and while many people expected Scott Hall to be inducted, what they didn't necessarily expect is that it's specifically Razor Ramon receiving the honor. Scott Hall certainly deserves to be in the Hall of Fame. Factual or not, he's widely considered to be the first true “Cool Heel” as Razor Ramon. He was part of the first WWF ladder match against Shawn Michaels and was one of the greatest Intercontinental champions ever.
FEATURES
By KEVIN ECK and KEVIN ECK,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Years before professional wrestling became a pop culture phenomenon punctuated by pay-per-view extravaganzas and pyrotechnics, Wayne Coleman was clearly ahead of his time. Performing as Superstar Billy Graham, with tie-dyed attire, bleached-blond hair and a chiseled, bronze physique, and spouting Muhammad Ali-inspired jive talk, Coleman provided a vivid diversion during wrestling's era of dimly lit arenas and grainy UHF stations in the 1970s. Capitol Wrestling Legends Fanfest Tomorrow through Sunday; Doubletree Hotel, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville; 30 professional wrestling legends are scheduled to appear.
NEWS
November 6, 2007
LILLIAN ELLISON, 84 Wrestling's Fabulous Moolah Lillian Ellison, professional wrestling's Fabulous Moolah, died Friday in Columbia, S.C. Mary Lillian Ellison was dubbed the Fabulous Moolah after saying she wrestled "for the money ... for the moolah." She was a longtime champion and the first woman inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame. Her autobiography, The Fabulous Moolah: First Goddess of the Squared Circle, was published in 2003.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | May 19, 2007
If there's one subject I never get tired of talking about, it's professional wrestling. Unfortunately, I don't always have a lot of people to discuss it with. Yes, some of my friends are wrestling fans, but most are not as hardcore as I am. And my wife will listen politely, nod and utter the occasional "that's interesting," but I know she really doesn't care when I tell her that Shawn Michaels and John Cena had an awesome match on Monday Night Raw. That's why I am excited about joining baltimoresun.
NEWS
November 22, 1998
WHILE WE'RE negotiating for billions from the tobacco industry to be rid of Joe Camel, maybe we can divert some of the payout to exterminate another nasty influence on youth: professional wrestling.Do we really need violence -- faked though it is -- made more appealing to children?Professional wrestling, in the midst of a resurgence, isn't as campy as it was in the 1970s. It's darker. It's edgier. It's bloodier.Wrestling has always drawn a large proportion of young fans, but in today's niche marketing, the focus has been sharpened.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Congress, which has examined steroid policies in baseball, football and basketball in the past few years, must now address allegations of "rampant" steroid use in professional wrestling, says a Florida lawmaker. "Between 1985 and 2006, 89 wrestlers have died before the age of 50," Republican Rep. Cliff Stearns said yesterday. "Of course, not all of these deaths can be attributed to steroid use. However, this abnormally high number of deaths of young, fit athletes should raise congressional alarms."
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | June 22, 1999
LIKE it or not, professional wrestling, or what passes for it, is popular again. The "sport" is a key attraction worldwide on cable television, drawing an estimated 35 million viewers.What viewers see is wrestling-as-show-business, a sort of burlesque. These so-called wrestlers fake everything about the competition -- the holds, the pain, the wins, the losses.But we shouldn't be too quick to deride them or their game. Baltimore has a history of staging versions of this kitsch to packed houses.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | August 27, 2013
A new comic book based on pro wrestling is seeking funding via Kickstarter . The project, entitled "Headlocked: The Last Territory," will be about a man (Mike Hartmann) trying to achieve his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. I recently caught up with one of the comic's creators, Michael Kingston, to talk about the project. Tell me about "Headlocked" In one sentence, it's a wrestling cable drama in a comic book. Headlocked is the story of Mike Hartmann, a college theater major that unexpectedly falls in love with professional wrestling, and his journey through the underbelly of the wrestling business as he tries to get to the bright lights and the big stage of the WFW. It's one part coming-of-age-story and one part examination of the craft of wrestling through the eyes of a performance artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Elvis will not be leaving the building Saturday. Nor will any of the other contestants in Elvis' Birthday Fight Club, a combination battle-to-the-finish boxing grudge match and burlesque show where past champions have included a chicken and a vibrating robot. "We like to think of ourselves as either burlesque-plus or theater-minus," explains Elvis' Birthday Fight Club (we'll go by EBFC from here on) founder-promoter-participant Jared Davis, who is bringing his creation to Highlandtown's Creative Alliance at the Patterson for the second straight year.
NEWS
By Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 26, 2011
He could be brought to tears by the plight of a citizen down on his luck. He could be made to laugh when his idiosyncrasies were made the topic of (even public) discussion. He would forgive and forget even the most egregious acts — if he believed the offender had operated from the heart. He would play the fool in the interest of erecting buildings or helping the downtrodden — the only two things he really cared about anyway. He could not (and would not) stand for acts of ugly partisanship, for he did not see Republicans or Democrats — only whether you were with him or against him. He could be downright mean and ill-tempered when public servants failed in their daily tasks.
NEWS
November 6, 2007
LILLIAN ELLISON, 84 Wrestling's Fabulous Moolah Lillian Ellison, professional wrestling's Fabulous Moolah, died Friday in Columbia, S.C. Mary Lillian Ellison was dubbed the Fabulous Moolah after saying she wrestled "for the money ... for the moolah." She was a longtime champion and the first woman inducted into the World Wrestling Entertainment Hall of Fame. Her autobiography, The Fabulous Moolah: First Goddess of the Squared Circle, was published in 2003.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | July 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Congress, which has examined steroid policies in baseball, football and basketball in the past few years, must now address allegations of "rampant" steroid use in professional wrestling, says a Florida lawmaker. "Between 1985 and 2006, 89 wrestlers have died before the age of 50," Republican Rep. Cliff Stearns said yesterday. "Of course, not all of these deaths can be attributed to steroid use. However, this abnormally high number of deaths of young, fit athletes should raise congressional alarms."
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | June 28, 2007
I suppose because professional wrestling isn't considered a real sport, Congress will ignore what's happening in the squared circle and continue to obsess over steroid use in baseball. That's a shame. I'll admit that I haven't done any research on the topic, but I'm guessing more "wrestlers" have dropped dead from abusing 'roids, which enlarge their bodies to cartoonish proportions - including their hearts - than major league players. But hey, why bother to react to the tragic events that unfolded inside Chris Benoit's home when you can fire more questions at Jason Giambi?
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 18, 1999
IF THERE'S ONE question that troubles every thinking person, it's this: Does cheating go on in professional wrestling?In an effort to find an answer, I recently attended a tournament sanctioned by Florida Championship Wrestling. I chose FCW for two solid journalistic reasons:* It is a venerable circuit in the minor leagues of professional wrestling, where the potential stars of tomorrow learn the ground rules, the do's and don't's, that make up the ethical standards of the sport.* It is near my house.
FEATURES
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2003
An evening of professional wrestling will be presented at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie tonight, but there won't be any father vs. daughter matches on the card. Nor will there be comedy skits, scantily clad women or outlandish story lines. It certainly doesn't sound like a World Wrestling Entertainment event - and that's the point. Ring of Honor, a small independent wrestling company based in Philadelphia and making its Maryland debut tonight, was formed nearly two years ago to provide an underground alternative to WWE's slick brand of sports entertainment.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | May 19, 2007
If there's one subject I never get tired of talking about, it's professional wrestling. Unfortunately, I don't always have a lot of people to discuss it with. Yes, some of my friends are wrestling fans, but most are not as hardcore as I am. And my wife will listen politely, nod and utter the occasional "that's interesting," but I know she really doesn't care when I tell her that Shawn Michaels and John Cena had an awesome match on Monday Night Raw. That's why I am excited about joining baltimoresun.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | September 28, 2006
Teddy Stigma is smiling, which is a peculiar thing to do after a sunset flip powerbomb. He is flat on his back; his legs, encased in cherry red Spandex, are spread wide. Most of his body rests on a thin but ostensibly protective floor mat; his head, however, is on the rock-hard tile. He must have misjudged the height of the wrestling ring, or the strength of his own legs as they launched the airborne backward somersault that landed him here moments ago with a resounding smack. The mistake doesn't matter - in fact, Teddy thinks, it sweetens the performance.
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