Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProfessional Women
IN THE NEWS

Professional Women

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The Business and Professional Women of Maryland's annual conference is May 17 and 18 at the Holiday Inn Laurel-West, 15101 Sweitzer Lane. The theme of the conference is "The Power of YOU - Equality, Advocacy, Development!" Several conference events are open to the public, including the kick off luncheon with a focus on women in the military; the Individual Development Program sessions on public speaking and goal setting; and the Saturday luncheon with a panel discussing human trafficking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Stephanie Beran | March 2, 2014
I must start with a confession: This scares me. When the Baltimore Sun offered me the chance to contribute a series of six columns "focusing on issues of women in business ... offering analysis, insight and advice," I wondered: Can I do it? As an accountant and risk manager who has risen to be a managing director with Legg Mason, I am entirely confident with business writing: memoranda, planning documents, notes to financial statements. I'm good at that sort of thing. Writing for a newspaper is different.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
To Judy Westphal, helping to create a mammography program for co-workers at North Arundel Hospital was "just doing a part of my job."It was taking care of family, explained the 54-year-old nurse. "We just felt like you need to look after your own family, and, of course, this was our work family."But to the Glen Burnie Business and Professional Women's Association, it was an effort that led them to name her Woman of the Year for 1996. She was selected for the award based on co-workers' nominations.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The Business and Professional Women of Maryland's annual conference is May 17 and 18 at the Holiday Inn Laurel-West, 15101 Sweitzer Lane. The theme of the conference is "The Power of YOU - Equality, Advocacy, Development!" Several conference events are open to the public, including the kick off luncheon with a focus on women in the military; the Individual Development Program sessions on public speaking and goal setting; and the Saturday luncheon with a panel discussing human trafficking.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
The women who came to Catonsville Community Park yesterday were small in number but big in determination. Ten women showed up to try out for the newly formed National Women's Football League. Battling chilly temperatures - and a healthy dose of skepticism from those who believe a viable female football league is about as possible as the Colts coming back - the women passed, blocked and chased their dream. "I've always wanted to play football," said Dawn Muscato of Glen Burnie. "I was beyond psyched when I heard about this."
NEWS
January 3, 2010
Loretta Warfield-Davis has been appointed manager at Howard Bank's Maple Lawn branch. She holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Baltimore and is a member of the Maryland Bankers Association, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., Notary Public of Baltimore, the Prestigious Business Network and the National Association of Professional Women.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 13, 1993
Women who are teachers, religion workers or librarians have a significantly greater chance of dying from breast cancer than homemakers or other women in nonprofessional occupations, according to a federal study to be released today.The study, which has already prompted special campaigns from two major teachers' groups, is the first to link breast cancer deaths with occupation on a large scale.Carol Hogfoss Rubin, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said her findings do not indicate that the occupations themselves are causing breast cancer, but rather that other outside factors associated with them -- such as delayed childbearing -- may be to blame.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 31, 1994
Among recent black college graduates, women now earn more than men, according to census figures, and some sociologists say that may be an economic disincentive to marriage.In fact, black college-educated women have made such financial strides since 1980 that many now earn as much or more than white women with similar education and similar work experience.The big wage gains for black professional women came in the 1980s as the salaries of white professional women rose slightly and those of black men eroded.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 13, 1993
Women who are teachers, religion workers or librarians have a significantly greater chance of dying from breast cancer than homemakers or other women in nonprofessional occupations, according to a federal study to be released today.The study, which has already prompted special campaigns from two major teachers' groups, is the first to link breast cancer deaths with occupation on a large scale.Carol Hogfoss Rubin, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said her findings do not indicate that the occupations themselves are causing breast cancer, but rather that other outside factors associated with them -- such as delayed childbearing -- may be to blame.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 20, 1992
Professional women who are married and have children do not sacrifice their careers by pursuing the "mommy track," according to the authors of a new study about women and work.On the other hand, women who single-mindedly devote themselves to work have not guaranteed themselves a place on the fast track, the Canadian study found.Comparing single women without children, married women without children, and married women with children, researchers found that although childless women spent significantly longer hours on the job than working mothers, they did not make more money in their chosen fields.
NEWS
January 3, 2010
Loretta Warfield-Davis has been appointed manager at Howard Bank's Maple Lawn branch. She holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Baltimore and is a member of the Maryland Bankers Association, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., Notary Public of Baltimore, the Prestigious Business Network and the National Association of Professional Women.
NEWS
By JANENE HOLZBERG | October 30, 2008
As a couple of dozen women trickled into a popular lakefront restaurant in Columbia, the noise level jumped a notch or two. Conversation usually trumps wine-drinking whenever Girls Who Swirl gets together, though not by much. Part networking opportunity, part unofficial sorority and part gathering of wine aficionados, the eclectic women-only group had come to Clyde's on Monday evening to take advantage of half-price wine night. "Simply put, we are a very enthusiastic group of professional women who love to drink wine," said organizer Jody Aud of the Howard County portion of Mount Airy.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 8, 2007
In a city where African-American women represent the largest bloc of primary voters, the prospect of keeping Baltimore's top four elected offices filled by black women never strays far from the campaign conversation. So, on a stage in Druid Hill Park one recent Saturday afternoon, a group of elected officials - all women, all but one of them African-American - stood side by side and celebrated their joint success. "There is a feeling all over this city that it is definitely ... the women's time to take over," said City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2003
After nearly four decades of worship in an open sanctuary, men and women at Beth Tfiloh Synagogue - one of the nation's largest Orthodox congregations - will soon have a symbolic wall to separate them. Responding to a tilt toward tradition among a younger generation of Orthodox Jews nationwide, Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg plans to install a mechitzah, or partition in Hebrew - which divides the sexes and has its roots in the days of Jerusalem's ancient temple. As a gesture to the congregation's many professional women - some of whom oppose a mechitzah - Wohlberg has also proposed more female participation in the otherwise male-dominated Orthodox service.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 4, 2002
ECONOMIST Sylvia Ann Hewlett is the author of a new book chronicling the unhappiness of successful women who postponed childbearing for the sake of their careers only to learn that they had waited too long. Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children has received lots of attention: 60 Minutes, Oprah, the morning news shows and newspaper and magazine ink. But the book itself isn't selling and that, more than the specter of power-suited women weeping over empty cradles, is the phenomenon: How is it possible the public isn't slapping down $22 in the face of this publicity juggernaut?
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
You could tell it wasn't a typical "career day" at St. Paul's School for Girls when a student asked the four visiting women if they were wearing guns - and three of them said yes. More than 200 girls at the private school in Brooklandville heard how a lawyer from a small town in California became head of the FBI's Baltimore office and how a former airline employee became a firearms instructor and spokeswoman for the Baltimore County police. They heard from a veteran Baltimore police detective about the dangers - and dirt - she encountered while working undercover buying drugs.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | May 15, 1991
CHICAGO -- When male workers proudly tell employers and colleagues that they're about to become fathers, the usual response is joyful congratulations.But when female workers proudly make the same announcement -- or word gets out -- often the response is that, figuratively, everyone breaks out in a sweat."Pregnancy for the professional too often is considered abnormal or malignant," said Karen Larson, head of the anthropology and sociology departments at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minn.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | June 4, 2002
ECONOMIST Sylvia Ann Hewlett is the author of a new book chronicling the unhappiness of successful women who postponed childbearing for the sake of their careers only to learn that they had waited too long. Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children has received lots of attention: 60 Minutes, Oprah, the morning news shows and newspaper and magazine ink. But the book itself isn't selling and that, more than the specter of power-suited women weeping over empty cradles, is the phenomenon: How is it possible the public isn't slapping down $22 in the face of this publicity juggernaut?
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
The women who came to Catonsville Community Park yesterday were small in number but big in determination. Ten women showed up to try out for the newly formed National Women's Football League. Battling chilly temperatures - and a healthy dose of skepticism from those who believe a viable female football league is about as possible as the Colts coming back - the women passed, blocked and chased their dream. "I've always wanted to play football," said Dawn Muscato of Glen Burnie. "I was beyond psyched when I heard about this."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 2, 1998
BOSTON -- This is not a sexy story. Which is, after all, the whole point.For the past many weeks and months, we've been awash in so many tales about sex in the workplace that it's been nearly impossible to get any work done.First Paula Corbin Jones had everyone talking about the line between an unwanted sexual advance and sexual harassment. Then Monica Lewinsky opened up endless corporate speculation on whether and when sex between a male boss and a female underling is consensual and when it's abusive.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.