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By JEFFREY M. LANDAW | November 21, 1993
"Vice is a monster of so frightful mienAs to be hated needs but to be seen;Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,first endure, then pity, then embrace."-- Alexander Pope, "Essay on Man."The next time somebody complains -- accurately -- that professional sports promoters don't respect their paying customers, ask why they should.They extort, they blackmail, they debase their product, they blame us for their failures, they lie, they cheat, they steal, they kick us in the teeth for sheer fun. And back we come every time, like Oliver Twist asking for more.
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NEWS
September 23, 2013
If University of Maryland Athletic Director Kevin Anderson happened to pick up Time magazine's Sept. 16th issue, he must have choked on his coffee. The cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes," represented a huge leap forward for the movement to professionalize big-time college football and men's basketball programs, and that's bad news for the University of Maryland and many other schools like it. Should this come to pass, Maryland will find itself on the bottom floor of a two-tiered caste system with no means of improving its lot. "What's wrong with a top football player receiving an extra $50,000 a year?"
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NEWS
By Sheldon Richman | December 2, 1997
NO SOONER did Wayne Huizinga's Florida Marlins win the World Series than he repeated his hope that the city of Miami would build the team a new baseball park. Mr. Huizinga is a successful businessman who is convinced that the city will not finance the park if he is connected with the team. So he is willing to sell his World Champions if necessary to ensure that the park is built.The idea that the taxpayers should pay for professional sports facilities is a rather dramatic illustration of how far we have drifted from the founding ideals of this country.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Major League Baseball will announce Tuesday a new policy to protect players from discrimination and harassment based on sexual-orientation, according to a report from The Associated Press . Per MLB's new guidelines, which strengthen existing policies, the league will develop a workplace code of conduct, create a centralized system for reports of harassment and offer new training sessions to major league and minor league athletes. The league plans to announce its policy during Tuesday's All-Star Game festivities in New York.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 24, 1998
I COULD TELL you how revolted I was by last week's spectacle of Dem O's and those revolting New York Yankees setting back the pugilistic sciences in what has laughingly been called their fight. I could tell you that, but you know I'd be lying.Oh, we've all heard the condemnation of the violence. The brawl was a disgrace. Armando Benitez has been described as only a notch above the Antichrist for hitting Tino Martinez with a pitch.What was my reaction to Martinez getting hit?"He's a Yankee," I proclaimed to anyone who would listen.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 29, 2003
UNCASVILLE, Conn. - Breaking a longtime taboo, a WNBA team became the first major professional sports organization owned by a casino. The Mohegan Sun, an Indian casino that grosses about $1 billion annually, bought the Orlando Miracle yesterday for a price reported to be between $5 million and $10 million. This summer, the rechristened Women's National Basketball Association team - the Connecticut Sun - will play in a 10,000-seat arena adjacent to the Mohegan Tribe's hotel and casino, one of the world's largest, with 300,000 square feet of gambling space.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 25, 2008
Times have been tough for Baltimore's two major professional sports franchises, but if you're looking for sympathy from South Florida, you might want to think again. Here's the main sports headline in the South Florida Sun-Sentinel yesterday: Welcome to Loserville The sports centerpiece included a photo montage of the four professional teams in the Miami area. The NFL's Miami Dolphins are coming off a 1-15 season. The NBA's Miami Heat is 9-44. Baseball's Florida Marlins were 20 games under .500 last year.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
In the whitewashed basement of a church in Annapolis, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson rallied his supporters last night to rebuild the Maryland Rainbow Coalition.The day after he withdrew from the race to succeed the Rev. Benjamin L. Hooks as head of the NAACP, Mr. Jackson made it clear that he had not lost stature as a powerful leader.His hourlong speech on racism in professional sports was interrupted numerous times by applause and shouts of approval from a crowd of more than 60 at Mount Olive African Methodist Episcopal Church in Maryland's capital.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
In the whitewashed basement of a church in Annapolis, the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson rallied his supporters last night to rebuild the Maryland Rainbow Coalition.The day after he withdrew from the race to succeed the Rev. Benjamin L. Hooks as head of the NAACP, Mr. Jackson made it clear that he had not lost stature as a powerful leader.His hour-long speech on racism in professional sports was interrupted numerous times by applause and shouts of approval from a crowd of more than 60 at Mount Olive African Methodist Episcopal Church in Maryland's capital.
NEWS
November 27, 2002
AS A STAR tight end for the Cleveland Browns, Ozzie Newsome redefined the position. Great hands, it was said about him. But the Hall of Famer had something else, a focus more cerebral than physical. He carried that focus into the personnel offices of the Baltimore Ravens, building a Super Bowl championship team with relative unknowns and under tight fiscal constraints. Now, as the team's new general manager, fans can expect the same level of skill, professionalism and passion from Mr. Newsome.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
This time, it played out in real life -- not on the pages of Sports Illustrated, but on the pitch. When openly-gay midfielder Robbie Rogers trotted onto the field for the LA Galaxy in this weekend's match against the Seattle Sounders, he made history "as the 1st openly gay athlete to play in American professional sports," as the Galaxy's official Twitter feed read. There is video: The teammate Rogers subs in for, Juninho, gives him double high-fives. Another teammate gives him a friendly slap as he runs into position.
NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
SPORTS
February 19, 2013
Cuban plays hard Ben Bolch Los Angeles Times The NBA still has the best owner in pro sports even after the passing of Jerry Buss. His name is Mark Cuban. Not only do his teams win (with the notable exception of this season), but he pampers his players, speaks his mind and always is looking for ways to improve and innovate. Besides, what other owner has appeared on "Entourage" and "The Colbert Report" and starred in his own reality show, "Shark Tank"? Cuban is a man of the people despite his extreme wealth.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 26, 2012
It's tempting to look at the way the Orioles have been struggling at the plate over the past couple of weeks and chalk it up to the normal ebb and flow of the 162-game major league season. After all, the Orioles somehow managed to win four of the nine games leading into Tuesday night's series opener against the Angels without averaging two runs per game, which could be construed as another sign that this is some kind of magical season in which the normal relationship between performance and result does not apply.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 3, 2010
The book on new Orioles manager Buck Showalter is a fairly easy read. He's known as a master of preparation, a student of the game, a micromanager and a guy who can see the big picture and the small picture at the same time. That was on display at his introductory news conference Monday afternoon at Camden Yards. He talked about the Orioles' proud history. He was deferential to outgoing interim manager Juan Samuel. He deftly navigated inquiries about the sensitive, uncharted territory he will inhabit alongside Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail and owner Peter Angelos.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. - - Bob Clark is standing a few hundred feet from Gillette Stadium, home of the New England Patriots, when he predicts that the team he has supported for decades will lose Sunday's playoff game against the Ravens. It doesn't faze Clark offering up such doomsday conjecture. He knows that the end of football season marks the unofficial beginning of hockey and basketball seasons. And the teams representing Boston in those sports have as much - if not more - of a shot than the Patriots to bring the area its sixth professional sports championship since 2001.
NEWS
December 29, 2008
The proposals for a new Baltimore arena envision a sporting and entertainment venue unlike any in the city: a seven-screen movie theater, a rooftop park, a 1,000-seat concert hall, hotels and, of course, an 18,500-seat sports arena in combination with some or all of the above. But what's missing is any reasonable idea of who's going to pay to build a $300 million-plus complex in this economy, and without that element, the arena proposals remain little more than grand dreams of a re-imagined civic center.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
This time, it played out in real life -- not on the pages of Sports Illustrated, but on the pitch. When openly-gay midfielder Robbie Rogers trotted onto the field for the LA Galaxy in this weekend's match against the Seattle Sounders, he made history "as the 1st openly gay athlete to play in American professional sports," as the Galaxy's official Twitter feed read. There is video: The teammate Rogers subs in for, Juninho, gives him double high-fives. Another teammate gives him a friendly slap as he runs into position.
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