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By Patricia Meisol | November 20, 1991
A panel of University of Maryland regents acted yesterday to restore money for 30 faculty and 675 students in the schools of law and social work in Baltimore next fall. The schools were slated for major reductions in a 1993 budget proposal that passed earlier.At the behest of Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg, the regents' finance committee approved a plan to redirect $3 million from building repairs, merit pay raises and an enhancement plan for the medical school to support already employed faculty and existing academic programs on the professional schools campus.
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NEWS
July 2, 2014
We are writing in response to the June 30 Baltimore Sun article "Equality's Struggles," featuring Esther McCready, a 1953 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The article's sub-head, "Setting the Foundation," could not be more appropriate. For the past 60 years, the foundation set by Ms. McCready's courage and fortitude has continued to open doors not only for African-American nursing students but for minority students in all the professional schools (dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy, and social work)
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NEWS
September 11, 2013
Your recent article on the difficulty President Obama is having persuading other nations to support a U.S. attack on Syria is the current retelling of Homer's "Iliad," in which two proud men have a foolish quarrel and many must die as a result ("Obama feels a chill in Russia," Sept 6). Sadly, as Benjamin Franklin wrote, experience is a dear teacher, but some will learn from no other. Professional schools' curriculums must include the classics because that is where to learn to understand how people respond to stress.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
Your recent article on the difficulty President Obama is having persuading other nations to support a U.S. attack on Syria is the current retelling of Homer's "Iliad," in which two proud men have a foolish quarrel and many must die as a result ("Obama feels a chill in Russia," Sept 6). Sadly, as Benjamin Franklin wrote, experience is a dear teacher, but some will learn from no other. Professional schools' curriculums must include the classics because that is where to learn to understand how people respond to stress.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
William J. Kinnard Jr., acting president of the University of Maryland at Baltimore, has resigned effective Monday because he was not offered the job on a permanent basis by the UM Board of Regents.Kinnard tendered his resignation to UM Chancellor Donald Langenberg last Friday after a search committee informed him that his candidacy to head the downtown Baltimore campus of UM professional schools was rejected.He is being replaced by Dental School Dean Errol L. Reese, a source said. Reese has been informed that the regents may take up to two years to fill the presidency because the national search so far has not yielded any candidates that are acceptable, a source said.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
We are writing in response to the June 30 Baltimore Sun article "Equality's Struggles," featuring Esther McCready, a 1953 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The article's sub-head, "Setting the Foundation," could not be more appropriate. For the past 60 years, the foundation set by Ms. McCready's courage and fortitude has continued to open doors not only for African-American nursing students but for minority students in all the professional schools (dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy, and social work)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
From his 14th-floor office on West Saratoga Street, Jay A. Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, surveys the urban campus on downtown's west side and envisions the future. Despite years of revitalization efforts, too many blocks near the growing campus of professional schools and medical facilities contain shuttered storefronts and vacant buildings. But Perman is not wringing his hands. Instead, he and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake are leading an effort to tackle the west side anew.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
H. Mebane Turner plans to retire in 2002, after more than three decades as president of the University of Baltimore. "I think that's a good time," Turner said yesterday. "I'll be 71 and a half. And fortunately, it's me setting the date, not someone else." Turner informed the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland of his intention in a recent letter. He noted that the fund-raising campaigns of UB and the system will end June 30, 2002. "It seems to me, with the Regents' concurrence, that I would like to relinquish my administrative duties anytime after that date when a suitable successor has been selected and can begin their duties," he wrote.
NEWS
By Darlene Brannigan Smith | May 20, 2013
Would it surprise you to learn that Fast Company magazine just ranked Maryland the third-most innovative state in the nation? Or that Maryland took the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's No. 1 spot for both innovation and entrepreneurship? It's a fact: In our state's dynamic mix of world-class universities and professional schools, institutes for advanced research, teaching hospitals, think tanks, hubs for start-up businesses and more, there exists this mysterious, economically essential activity known as innovation.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
Maryland universities' graduate and professional programs gained high rankings in U.S. News & World Report's review, an annual rite that offered few surprises.The magazine's March 20 issue rated the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine No. 2 in the nation. That's the third straight year Hopkins has finished second to Harvard University -- but it's heady company."Whenever anyone ranks you in the top cadre of medical schools, you're pleased to be there," said Dr. Michael E. Johns, dean of Hopkins' medical school.
NEWS
By Darlene Brannigan Smith | May 20, 2013
Would it surprise you to learn that Fast Company magazine just ranked Maryland the third-most innovative state in the nation? Or that Maryland took the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's No. 1 spot for both innovation and entrepreneurship? It's a fact: In our state's dynamic mix of world-class universities and professional schools, institutes for advanced research, teaching hospitals, think tanks, hubs for start-up businesses and more, there exists this mysterious, economically essential activity known as innovation.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
From his 14th-floor office on West Saratoga Street, Jay A. Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, surveys the urban campus on downtown's west side and envisions the future. Despite years of revitalization efforts, too many blocks near the growing campus of professional schools and medical facilities contain shuttered storefronts and vacant buildings. But Perman is not wringing his hands. Instead, he and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake are leading an effort to tackle the west side anew.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | September 17, 2009
The University of Maryland, Baltimore officially opened its $58 million student center on Wednesday, with hopes that the building will provide a unifying point for a campus long composed of highly independent schools. The Southern Management Corporation Campus Center includes dining areas, conference and study rooms, an indoor pool, basketball courts, an elevated track and a fitness room. UMB President David Ramsay called the seven-level brick-and-glass center a "transformational" building for his campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Sun Staff | June 5, 2005
Coach: Lessons on the Game of Life By Michael Lewis. W.W. Norton. 96 pages. $12.95. 3 Nights in August By Buzz Bissinger. Houghton Mifflin. 256 pages. $25. Like many who have coached youth baseball teams, I have often wondered how the professionals do the job. How did they get their players to perform, to do what they are told. Two recent books approach this question and produce thought-provoking if occasionally contradictory answers. In Michael Lewis' Coach, Billy Fitzgerald, the teacher and taskmaster who coached the baseball team at Isidore Newman school, a private school Lewis attended in New Orleans, aims for the heads of his players.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
H. Mebane Turner plans to retire in 2002, after more than three decades as president of the University of Baltimore. "I think that's a good time," Turner said yesterday. "I'll be 71 and a half. And fortunately, it's me setting the date, not someone else." Turner informed the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland of his intention in a recent letter. He noted that the fund-raising campaigns of UB and the system will end June 30, 2002. "It seems to me, with the Regents' concurrence, that I would like to relinquish my administrative duties anytime after that date when a suitable successor has been selected and can begin their duties," he wrote.
NEWS
December 15, 1998
SOME of Baltimore's most important universities find themselves in straitjackets placed on them by two governing boards that don't fathom their pivotal roles in regional development.Towson University, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the downtown professional campus known as the University of Maryland, Baltimore lag in getting the funds needed to excel at their missions. They are hindered by a mystifying web of bureaucracy and overlapping authorities with no strong advocates on Maryland's governing boards.
NEWS
February 14, 1998
THE UNIVERSITY of Maryland, Baltimore recently released details of a $38 million plan to double the size of its Law Library building at Baltimore and Paca streets. It was the latest expansion announcement at the downtown campus."The need for the building is critical and is caused by the dramatic changes in legal education over the past generation," law school Dean Donald G. Gifford explained in accepting a $2.5 million commitment toward the project from the France-Merrick Foundations. He said to day's law students and interns need more flexible clinic space.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | November 6, 1991
Academics at the University of Maryland's professional schools in Baltimore are waging a fierce campaign to change a proposed 1993 budget that -- among other things -- would slash by half the number of students who could enroll in law and social work.The plan to cut law and social work enrollments by 675 students, as well as cut faculty at the two schools by one-third, is contained in a budget submitted under protest by the president of the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Dr. Errol L. Reese.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
IT'S NO EASY JOB running the University of Maryland, Baltimore. When David J. Ramsay took the job of president nearly four years ago, fresh from the University of California at San Francisco, he'd been preceded by eight men in the previous decade.A Prince George's County state delegate had called UMAB "a collection of fiefdoms, populated with strong personalities."The British-born Ramsay vowed to halt the infighting and move the schools of dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work into the top ranks of their fields.
NEWS
February 14, 1998
THE UNIVERSITY of Maryland, Baltimore recently released details of a $38 million plan to double the size of its Law Library building at Baltimore and Paca streets. It was the latest expansion announcement at the downtown campus."The need for the building is critical and is caused by the dramatic changes in legal education over the past generation," law school Dean Donald G. Gifford explained in accepting a $2.5 million commitment toward the project from the France-Merrick Foundations. He said to day's law students and interns need more flexible clinic space.
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