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By STEVEN MULLER | October 15, 1993
The ignominious end to the previously illustrious career ofCoach Don James at the University of Washington has once again kindled flaming outrage over the corruption of intercollegiate sports in general, and intercollegiate football in particular. The outrage will no doubt die down again, as it has before, until the next major scandal.Such efforts as have been made in the past to remedy the problem have largely served only to make it worse. Perhaps the time has come to consider a drastic but viable solution.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | February 4, 2014
How odd is it that the two contenders in the Super Bowl -- the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos -- hail from the two states in the union that have legalized sale and use of marijuana? Are there two activities more different than the amped-up aggression of professional football and the laid back mellowness of smoking a joint? I've got nothing against Denver -- a perfectly fine city, as far as I'm concerned. But, as many of my readers know, I am a Seattle boy. My great grandparents arrived in the muddy little town on the shore of Puget Sound in the 1880s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
America's Game: The Epic Story of How Pro Football Captured a Nation by Michael MacCambridge. Random House. 552 pages. $27.95. As a diehard baseball fan, I have died hard each of these past 30 years watching America's pastime wither under the blitz of professional football. Not that there's anything wrong with football. I spent many a joyful fall afternoon running the pointy-ended ball to daylight. It's what you did every year when the World Series ended. When baseball reigned supreme, however, you didn't find left fielders confronting right tackles with "Our game is better than yours."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The time has come for the NCAA to return the championship weekend to smaller stadiums and venues. Seventh-seeded Duke's 16-10 rout of top-seeded Syracuse in Monday's tournament final at Lincoln Financial Field was marred by an announced attendance of 28,224 - the smallest crowd to watch a title game since championship weekend was moved to professional football stadiums for the 2003 campaign and since 2002. The weekend attendance of 79,179 (28,224 for the Division I final, 22,511 for the Division II and III finals on Sunday and 28,444 for the Division I semifinals on Saturday)
NEWS
August 16, 1992
Former All-County lineman Mitch Suplee has been hired as one of South River High's assistant football coaches, said Athletic Director Jim Haluck.Suplee, who played four years at the University of Maryland and was a second-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference selection last fall, will split a contract with another assistant, Chuck Golch. Both men will work part time at the position."Neither one of them can put in a full amount of time to the position," Haluck said. "Mitch still has a desire to play professional football -- and I hope he does -- so he'll be trying out for things.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 2, 1993
On Sunday, there will be football games in all the old important places.In Patterson Park in East Baltimore, some 14-year-old will break through the line and run toward a makeshift end zone while pursued by three tacklers and a beagle who mistakenly thinks he's a defensive halfback. We've all seen it happen. It's more fun than pro football.In a huddle on Fort Avenue in South Baltimore, a 12-year-old will tell his three teammates, "You cut behind the blue Chevy, you go out to the manhole cover and button-hook, and you go long."
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | December 2, 1993
WHEN Baltimore got dissed again by the National Football League Tuesday, here was one Baltimorean who wasn't unhappy. I'd been rooting against an NFL franchise in Baltimore for some time, and I think many Baltimoreans agree with me. Here are some of the reasons:* NFL football isn't that exciting. Only a couple of teams stand out, and most games have the excitement of a TV test pattern. The most thrilling season of professional football here was 28 years ago. It's been anticlimactic ever since.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | June 2, 1998
It is not clear that any survey of the population would reveal a deep yearning for another professional football league, but it looks as though we may be getting one anyway.Aced out of their traditional role in televising NFL games in the last, breathtakingly costly round of bidding for those rights, NBC and Turner broadcasting have announced plans to create a league of their own so as not to deny their viewers the ration of football they have been conditioned to expect.The two mean to bring some 10 to 12 franchises on line, perhaps as early as the fall of 1999.
NEWS
By David Horsey | February 4, 2014
How odd is it that the two contenders in the Super Bowl -- the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos -- hail from the two states in the union that have legalized sale and use of marijuana? Are there two activities more different than the amped-up aggression of professional football and the laid back mellowness of smoking a joint? I've got nothing against Denver -- a perfectly fine city, as far as I'm concerned. But, as many of my readers know, I am a Seattle boy. My great grandparents arrived in the muddy little town on the shore of Puget Sound in the 1880s.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | April 26, 2007
At last, the National Football League draft! April 28 is about to arrive - the day big-time college football players finally can throw off their chains. Soon they'll have real money in the pockets of their jeans. At long last, they'll be getting paid. From letter-of-intent day, when they were high school seniors, until draft day, nobody has given them a paycheck. Coaches have made millions, players nothing. When, some February past, they signed that four-page contract with 20 stipulations, the athletes agreed to go unpaid and give their colleges a monopoly on their services.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
The ink was barely dry on the new agreement between National Football League owners and players when word came out of Ravens headquarters that the team was releasing four popular players, including their two top receivers. Already the day the deed was done is being called Black Monday. If the four month lockout did not drive home the message that professional football is all about money, then showing the door to Derrick Mason, Todd Heap, Kelly Gregg and Willis McGahee, some of the most beloved Ravens, certainly did. These veteran players had to go, Ravens general manger Ozzie Newsome said, to give the team the financial flexibility to sign younger, more sought-after players, especially offensive linemen.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | April 26, 2007
At last, the National Football League draft! April 28 is about to arrive - the day big-time college football players finally can throw off their chains. Soon they'll have real money in the pockets of their jeans. At long last, they'll be getting paid. From letter-of-intent day, when they were high school seniors, until draft day, nobody has given them a paycheck. Coaches have made millions, players nothing. When, some February past, they signed that four-page contract with 20 stipulations, the athletes agreed to go unpaid and give their colleges a monopoly on their services.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
America's Game: The Epic Story of How Pro Football Captured a Nation by Michael MacCambridge. Random House. 552 pages. $27.95. As a diehard baseball fan, I have died hard each of these past 30 years watching America's pastime wither under the blitz of professional football. Not that there's anything wrong with football. I spent many a joyful fall afternoon running the pointy-ended ball to daylight. It's what you did every year when the World Series ended. When baseball reigned supreme, however, you didn't find left fielders confronting right tackles with "Our game is better than yours."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The first real football action of Super Bowl week didn't draw much of a crowd. Only a few hundred fans showed up at Clearwater High School yesterday afternoon to watch Japan play Canada in the opening game of Global Jr. Championship V - an international teen-age tournament that has become an annual part of the NFL's championship celebration. It is a goodwill event aimed at bringing together young players (most are 18 or 19 years old) from various parts of the world to compete in the spirit of friendship and promote American-style football.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
The women who came to Catonsville Community Park yesterday were small in number but big in determination. Ten women showed up to try out for the newly formed National Women's Football League. Battling chilly temperatures - and a healthy dose of skepticism from those who believe a viable female football league is about as possible as the Colts coming back - the women passed, blocked and chased their dream. "I've always wanted to play football," said Dawn Muscato of Glen Burnie. "I was beyond psyched when I heard about this."
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | June 2, 1998
It is not clear that any survey of the population would reveal a deep yearning for another professional football league, but it looks as though we may be getting one anyway.Aced out of their traditional role in televising NFL games in the last, breathtakingly costly round of bidding for those rights, NBC and Turner broadcasting have announced plans to create a league of their own so as not to deny their viewers the ration of football they have been conditioned to expect.The two mean to bring some 10 to 12 franchises on line, perhaps as early as the fall of 1999.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The first real football action of Super Bowl week didn't draw much of a crowd. Only a few hundred fans showed up at Clearwater High School yesterday afternoon to watch Japan play Canada in the opening game of Global Jr. Championship V - an international teen-age tournament that has become an annual part of the NFL's championship celebration. It is a goodwill event aimed at bringing together young players (most are 18 or 19 years old) from various parts of the world to compete in the spirit of friendship and promote American-style football.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 16, 1997
In Landover, the team still known as the Washington Redskins played the first game in its new football stadium Sunday before 1,846 empty seats.In Baltimore, the team known as the Ravens suffered a television blackout when it failed to sell out Memorial Stadium a week ago. The week before that, which was Opening Day, it sold out only with last-second corporate help. In death, Jack Kent Cooke is starting to look like he understood something about the future.For a long time, Cooke, the late owner of the Redskins, was the great obstacle to pro football returning to Baltimore.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 16, 1997
In Landover, the team still known as the Washington Redskins played the first game in its new football stadium Sunday before 1,846 empty seats.In Baltimore, the team known as the Ravens suffered a television blackout when it failed to sell out Memorial Stadium a week ago. The week before that, which was Opening Day, it sold out only with last-second corporate help. In death, Jack Kent Cooke is starting to look like he understood something about the future.For a long time, Cooke, the late owner of the Redskins, was the great obstacle to pro football returning to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 30, 1996
MIAMI -- ''The pride and the presence of a professional football team is far more important than 30 libraries.''Art Modell, owner of the Baltimore Ravens (formerly the Cleveland Browns), said that in the September issue of Cleveland magazine.He said a lot more, too. Said that a team provides a town with a ''great social common denominator'' and has a ''tremendous binding effect on the public.'' He said he spoke with ''all due respect to the learning process.''Actually, he spoke with no respect at all. Or humility.
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