Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProfessional Ethics
IN THE NEWS

Professional Ethics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 1994
Hillary Rodham Clinton handled her first full-scale White House press conference with remarkable aplomb. When her husband spent nearly 40 minutes answering mostly Whitewater-related questions last month, we said he displayed "a master's touch." In her 66 minutes of a similar grilling and response last Friday, she was at least as good. She was responsive, showed little or no bitterness or resentfulness at the press' skepticism and answered most of the questions as fully as could be expected.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
Luxury boxes at major sporting events. Sold-out concerts. Galas. Vegas shows. Baltimore's lawmakers often receive tickets for shows and other popular events from developers, business people, corporations and nonprofits as one of the perks of office. Over three years, elected officials in City Hall reported getting more than 170 tickets worth more than $15,000, according to the most recent filings available. City Hall has strengthened ethics laws after Mayor Sheila Dixon pleaded guilty to perjury charges two years ago and agreed to resign after failing to disclose gifts from a developer boyfriend.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2004
Drawing on timeless principles, three teams of college philosophers wrestled with contemporary moral dilemmas yesterday as they competed in the Baltimore region's second annual Ethics Bowl. The participants in the event, held at Howard Community College, discussed the ethical nature of "three strikes" laws for repeat felons, differed on whether they would advise a family member to go to China to receive organs harvested from an executed prisoner, and talked about where to lay blame for a drunken driving accident after one friend let another drive home.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake is proposing broad changes in the way the city handles ethics, an issue that came to the forefront during the corruption investigation that ultimately led to Mayor Sheila Dixon's resignation. The proposed changes, detailed in a bill slated to be introduced at Monday's council meeting, would "strengthen public trust" in city government, said Rawlings-Blake, who will take over as mayor Feb. 4. "We're trying to do as much as we can to encourage impartiality," she said.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | September 25, 1990
During the buyout furor of last decade, morality in business reached a low point. Yet, while companies, instead of building themselves, were buying other companies or perishing in the effort, a different and opposing force got under way and became a groundswell.It started down in the ranks, far removed from the glass towers of corporate officers, with the people who create what corporate officers buy and sell.It's a surprising new phenomenon called technical ethics.Technical ethics is something you should know about, because it may determine whether a company whose stock you own will stride boldly forward into the future, or spend its money -- the money of its investors -- in debilitating lawsuits.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 1998
Theodore J. Kaczynski doesn't like his lawyers. And because of that, the Unabomber suspect's murder trial, one of the highest-profile federal trials of the year, was stopped as it was poised to begin in Sacramento, Calif., Monday.Kaczynski -- brilliant, perhaps mentally ill and accused in a 17-year-long string of bombings -- spoke out in court just as Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. took the bench. For three days, the trial was stalled as his dispute with his attorneys over defense tactics commanded the court's attention in closed-door hearings.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
The stand appears at the edge of a driveway along Pleasantville Road. It is a small, round patio table laden with fat tomatoes, green peppers, eggplant, beets and summer squash that Michael Donhauser has spent the past few months nurturing from seed to harvest. Donhauser, a retired grocery store manager, spends hours each day puttering in the two garden plots he cultivates behind his tidy Fallston home and his son's house across the two-lane road. He weeds and waters, plants and picks, tills and toils.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake is proposing broad changes in the way the city handles ethics, an issue that came to the forefront during the corruption investigation that ultimately led to Mayor Sheila Dixon's resignation. The proposed changes, detailed in a bill slated to be introduced at Monday's council meeting, would "strengthen public trust" in city government, said Rawlings-Blake, who will take over as mayor Feb. 4. "We're trying to do as much as we can to encourage impartiality," she said.
NEWS
By Narda Zacchino | November 14, 1999
CREDIBILITY. Integrity. Those bulwarks of journalism are qualities that readers expect to define the Los Angeles Times. But some are questioning the newspaper's adherence to those values in light of disclosures that revenue from the Oct. 10 Los Angeles Times Magazine were shared with the new Staples Center arena, the sole subject of that issue.The profit-sharing arrangement, denounced by the newspaper's journalists as well as many readers, was not known to the magazines writers and editors who produced the issue, and they were the most profoundly distressed to learn of the deal.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
In thy face I see the map of honor, truth, and loyalty. -- William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2 Yuppies don't have loyalty. They have useful relationships and meaningful encounters. -- English religious leader William Kristol If you've been paying attention to the news, you've no doubt noticed that one virtue in particular has been taking a drubbing lately. To say the least, these have not been proud days for loyalty, and not only because of John Walker Lindh. Enron, the Mommie Dearest of corporations, treated its employees like dupes in a con game.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2004
Drawing on timeless principles, three teams of college philosophers wrestled with contemporary moral dilemmas yesterday as they competed in the Baltimore region's second annual Ethics Bowl. The participants in the event, held at Howard Community College, discussed the ethical nature of "three strikes" laws for repeat felons, differed on whether they would advise a family member to go to China to receive organs harvested from an executed prisoner, and talked about where to lay blame for a drunken driving accident after one friend let another drive home.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2002
The stand appears at the edge of a driveway along Pleasantville Road. It is a small, round patio table laden with fat tomatoes, green peppers, eggplant, beets and summer squash that Michael Donhauser has spent the past few months nurturing from seed to harvest. Donhauser, a retired grocery store manager, spends hours each day puttering in the two garden plots he cultivates behind his tidy Fallston home and his son's house across the two-lane road. He weeds and waters, plants and picks, tills and toils.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
In thy face I see the map of honor, truth, and loyalty. -- William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2 Yuppies don't have loyalty. They have useful relationships and meaningful encounters. -- English religious leader William Kristol If you've been paying attention to the news, you've no doubt noticed that one virtue in particular has been taking a drubbing lately. To say the least, these have not been proud days for loyalty, and not only because of John Walker Lindh. Enron, the Mommie Dearest of corporations, treated its employees like dupes in a con game.
NEWS
By Narda Zacchino | November 14, 1999
CREDIBILITY. Integrity. Those bulwarks of journalism are qualities that readers expect to define the Los Angeles Times. But some are questioning the newspaper's adherence to those values in light of disclosures that revenue from the Oct. 10 Los Angeles Times Magazine were shared with the new Staples Center arena, the sole subject of that issue.The profit-sharing arrangement, denounced by the newspaper's journalists as well as many readers, was not known to the magazines writers and editors who produced the issue, and they were the most profoundly distressed to learn of the deal.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 1998
Theodore J. Kaczynski doesn't like his lawyers. And because of that, the Unabomber suspect's murder trial, one of the highest-profile federal trials of the year, was stopped as it was poised to begin in Sacramento, Calif., Monday.Kaczynski -- brilliant, perhaps mentally ill and accused in a 17-year-long string of bombings -- spoke out in court just as Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. took the bench. For three days, the trial was stalled as his dispute with his attorneys over defense tactics commanded the court's attention in closed-door hearings.
NEWS
April 27, 1994
Hillary Rodham Clinton handled her first full-scale White House press conference with remarkable aplomb. When her husband spent nearly 40 minutes answering mostly Whitewater-related questions last month, we said he displayed "a master's touch." In her 66 minutes of a similar grilling and response last Friday, she was at least as good. She was responsive, showed little or no bitterness or resentfulness at the press' skepticism and answered most of the questions as fully as could be expected.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
Luxury boxes at major sporting events. Sold-out concerts. Galas. Vegas shows. Baltimore's lawmakers often receive tickets for shows and other popular events from developers, business people, corporations and nonprofits as one of the perks of office. Over three years, elected officials in City Hall reported getting more than 170 tickets worth more than $15,000, according to the most recent filings available. City Hall has strengthened ethics laws after Mayor Sheila Dixon pleaded guilty to perjury charges two years ago and agreed to resign after failing to disclose gifts from a developer boyfriend.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1996
William I. Weston, a University of Baltimore law professor known among local attorneys for his sharp-tongued advocacy of causes ranging from mandatory continuing legal education to attorney discipline, plans to leave the law school next year to join a new school in Jacksonville, Fla.Mr. Weston will become associate dean of Florida Coastal Law School in May 1997, ending 22 years on the UB faculty.The lure of the new job is Florida Coastal's unusual curriculum, Mr. Weston said, one that will give greater emphasis practical lawyering skills and less to traditional academic teachings.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | September 25, 1990
During the buyout furor of last decade, morality in business reached a low point. Yet, while companies, instead of building themselves, were buying other companies or perishing in the effort, a different and opposing force got under way and became a groundswell.It started down in the ranks, far removed from the glass towers of corporate officers, with the people who create what corporate officers buy and sell.It's a surprising new phenomenon called technical ethics.Technical ethics is something you should know about, because it may determine whether a company whose stock you own will stride boldly forward into the future, or spend its money -- the money of its investors -- in debilitating lawsuits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.