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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2001
Maxwell H. Kisner, a fight promoter who as a teen-ager discovered that he didn't want to box, died Monday of heart failure, soon after being taken to Harbor Hospital Center. He was 62 and lived for 35 years in Brooklyn Park. Mr. Kisner came to Baltimore at 18 to work for the Social Security Administration and held several jobs, including driving a Trailways bus, before becoming a salesman for the BFI waste company. In 1987, Mr. Kisner began promoting professional fights and launched a dinner-and-boxing program at La Fontaine Bleu in Glen Burnie.
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NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Sports History BEYOND GLORY: JOE LOUIS VS. MAX SCHMELING AND A WORLD ON THE BRINK David Margolick Alfred A. Knopf / 432 pages SIXTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO, A PROFESSIONAL boxing match between an American Negro and a German "Aryan" took on an importance far out of proportion to a mere sporting event. Many African-Americans believed that in winning the heavyweight boxing championship, Joe Louis would help usher in a new era of acceptance of blacks into the Caucasian-dominated society.
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NEWS
July 1, 1997
THAT THUD you heard could be the sport of boxing hitting the canvas hard for the final count.The American public's long romance with this sport has taken a beating in recent years -- though it has found a profitable home on a few cable networks. NBC last year relegated Olympic boxing to the television equivalent of Siberia during its coverage of the Games, while feeding its audience generous portions of gymnastics, swimming and track.Now, comes Mike Tyson's brutal behavior in the ring during his Saturday night professional heavyweight bout against Evander Holyfield, in which he bit off part of his opponent's ear. The former champ has long been known as a self-destructive man, who not long ago was serving prison time for rape.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2001
Maxwell H. Kisner, a fight promoter who as a teen-ager discovered that he didn't want to box, died Monday of heart failure, soon after being taken to Harbor Hospital Center. He was 62 and lived for 35 years in Brooklyn Park. Mr. Kisner came to Baltimore at 18 to work for the Social Security Administration and held several jobs, including driving a Trailways bus, before becoming a salesman for the BFI waste company. In 1987, Mr. Kisner began promoting professional fights and launched a dinner-and-boxing program at La Fontaine Bleu in Glen Burnie.
FEATURES
By Seth Michelson and Seth Michelson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 1997
Professional boxing, an all-you-can-eat pasta dinner and a fireworks display are among the new attractions planned this year for the Preakness Celebration, Baltimore's annual pre-race extravaganza, set for the week of May 9-17."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
Professional boxing goes to college on Sept. 23, when local promoter Stuart Satosky will stage a show at UMBC Fieldhouse to be televised by ESPN.This is the first live fight card in memory to be held at a Baltimore-area college. Fittingly, it will feature unbeaten middleweight Dana Rosenblatt (21-0) of Malden, Mass., an honor student at Bunker Hill Community College. Four of Rosenblatt's knockouts were recorded in Baltimore.Satosky is seeking an attractive opponent, with former title contender Tyrone Trice a possible choice.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1998
Forget barroom brawls. Try ballroom boxing tonight at Michaels Eighth Avenue.This evening, the Glen Burnie banquet hall where hundreds of wedding receptions, business luncheons and bull roasts are held each year will be transformed into a Madison Square Garden of sorts with a boxing ring in the center of the 220-foot ballroom.At least 20 amateur fighters will face off in the ring for Arbutus Boxing Club trophies. Fans can be up close and personal for the three-round bouts, and that's what makes fight nights at Michaels grand.
NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Sports History BEYOND GLORY: JOE LOUIS VS. MAX SCHMELING AND A WORLD ON THE BRINK David Margolick Alfred A. Knopf / 432 pages SIXTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO, A PROFESSIONAL boxing match between an American Negro and a German "Aryan" took on an importance far out of proportion to a mere sporting event. Many African-Americans believed that in winning the heavyweight boxing championship, Joe Louis would help usher in a new era of acceptance of blacks into the Caucasian-dominated society.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | August 18, 1991
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California has 120 state lawmakers who are devoted to drafting new laws -- and one who says at least part of his mission is to take odd and obsolete laws off the books.For the past year, state Assemblyman Richard E. Floyd has been collecting entries for his "There Ought NOT to Be a Law" contest. Mr. Floyd, who also is a prolific author of gambling and liquor legislation, plans to choose a winner later this year.So far, about four dozen people have responded with nominations ranging from recently adopted controversial laws such as the state's mandatory seat belt law and auto insurance statutes to old, unenforced and, in some cases, obsolete laws such as those governing dueling or prohibiting professional boxing.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Robert F. Vankirk, a retired bottle maker and former Southwest Baltimore pugilist, died of cancer Thursday at his Westport residence. He was 73.Mr. Vankirk, known as "Pop," retired in 1991 from the Carr-Lowrey Glass Co. where he was a bottle maker for 50 years.The Pigtown native began his boxing career in 1938 with the Cross Country Boxing Club and participated in amateur tournaments. He turned professional in 1946 and fought in the middleweight and welterweight classes.His first professional fight was on March 4, 1946, against Pigtown rival Frank Les. He won the match in a four-round decision.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Lem Satterfield and Peter Schmuck and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
It took just a split second - one lightning-quick punch - for Baltimore boxer Hasim Rahman to become the heavyweight champion. He conquered the boxing world with one iron fist and positioned himself for at least a $14 million payday that will come with his first title defense. Seems simple enough, except that nothing is ever entirely as it seems in the complex, confusing and sometimes shady world of professional boxing. Rahman's situation was less complicated than most, because he landed that big right hand and dropped heavily favored Lennox Lewis without selling the rights to his next fight.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1998
Forget barroom brawls. Try ballroom boxing tonight at Michaels Eighth Avenue.This evening, the Glen Burnie banquet hall where hundreds of wedding receptions, business luncheons and bull roasts are held each year will be transformed into a Madison Square Garden of sorts with a boxing ring in the center of the 220-foot ballroom.At least 20 amateur fighters will face off in the ring for Arbutus Boxing Club trophies. Fans can be up close and personal for the three-round bouts, and that's what makes fight nights at Michaels grand.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF Bill Glauber of The Sun foreign staff also contributed to this article | July 9, 1997
Today in Las Vegas, the Nevada State Athletic Commission is expected to impose an 18- to 24-month suspension and a $3 million fine on Mike Tyson for twice biting the ears of champion Evander Holyfield in their heavyweight title bout June 28.But there is speculation that Tyson and promoter Don King might find some way to circumvent a ban, that King would capitalize on Tyson's notoriety by staging a megabucks match in Africa the same way he produced Muhammad...
NEWS
July 1, 1997
THAT THUD you heard could be the sport of boxing hitting the canvas hard for the final count.The American public's long romance with this sport has taken a beating in recent years -- though it has found a profitable home on a few cable networks. NBC last year relegated Olympic boxing to the television equivalent of Siberia during its coverage of the Games, while feeding its audience generous portions of gymnastics, swimming and track.Now, comes Mike Tyson's brutal behavior in the ring during his Saturday night professional heavyweight bout against Evander Holyfield, in which he bit off part of his opponent's ear. The former champ has long been known as a self-destructive man, who not long ago was serving prison time for rape.
FEATURES
By Seth Michelson and Seth Michelson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 1997
Professional boxing, an all-you-can-eat pasta dinner and a fireworks display are among the new attractions planned this year for the Preakness Celebration, Baltimore's annual pre-race extravaganza, set for the week of May 9-17."
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
Promoter Scott Wagner of Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie and his matchmaker Josh Hall have announced three pro boxing dates for the New Year with the possibility of Home Team Sports showing some of the action on a delayed broadcast basis.Pro boxing returns to Michael's on Feb. 15 and Wagner announced that arena style shows also are scheduled for April 11 and June 20."Josh and I want pro boxing to succeed and believe there is enough interest in it to pursue a set schedule for this year," said Wagner.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF Bill Glauber of The Sun foreign staff also contributed to this article | July 9, 1997
Today in Las Vegas, the Nevada State Athletic Commission is expected to impose an 18- to 24-month suspension and a $3 million fine on Mike Tyson for twice biting the ears of champion Evander Holyfield in their heavyweight title bout June 28.But there is speculation that Tyson and promoter Don King might find some way to circumvent a ban, that King would capitalize on Tyson's notoriety by staging a megabucks match in Africa the same way he produced Muhammad...
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | November 29, 1994
When Vincent Pettway began his professional career 10 years ago, he knew he needed a manager and trainer to handle his boxing affairs.But it was not until September when the Baltimore junior middleweight knocked out Gianfranco Rosi to win the International Boxing Federation title that he realized he also needed a social secretary.Since bringing his championship belt home, Pettway, 29, has been in constant demand to make public appearances at city schools, churches and sporting events. And, he was grand marshal of the annual Thanksgiving Day parade.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Robert F. Vankirk, a retired bottle maker and former Southwest Baltimore pugilist, died of cancer Thursday at his Westport residence. He was 73.Mr. Vankirk, known as "Pop," retired in 1991 from the Carr-Lowrey Glass Co. where he was a bottle maker for 50 years.The Pigtown native began his boxing career in 1938 with the Cross Country Boxing Club and participated in amateur tournaments. He turned professional in 1946 and fought in the middleweight and welterweight classes.His first professional fight was on March 4, 1946, against Pigtown rival Frank Les. He won the match in a four-round decision.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
TC"Become amazed at the quickness I display in the ring'Become enraptured with each song that I sing"Sharing my time can be as vibrant as Irish roses"Keep staring at me and you'll see some tingling poses.", -- From a poem by Paul Vaden LAS VEGAS -- Keats, Coleridge and Tennyson can rest easy. Paul Vaden is not yet a contender for poet laureate.But the undefeated San Diego fighter who challenges Baltimore's Vincent Pettway for his International Boxing Federation junior middleweight title tomorrow night is a man of many talents.
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