Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProfessional Bowlers
IN THE NEWS

Professional Bowlers

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 10, 1991
Duckpin bowling is attempting to unseat jousting as the official Maryland state sport, and two good reasons for the change will be contested today in Essex.Two of the major duckpin events in the nation will be bowled at XTC Fair Lanes Middlesex, bringing together the top male and youth bowlers in the country.The Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association Masters Tournament finals, pitting the leading male duckpin bowlers in the world, will be bowled beginning at 9 a.m. and the U.S. Youth Duckpin Invitational Championship, featuring the top boys and girls duckpinners in the nation, will be bowled starting at 10 a.m.Among the entrants in the Masters tournament will be Mike Steinert, Buddy Creamer, John Schramm, Eddie Darling, Bill Honeycutt, Scott Wolgamuth, George Young, Wayne Catlin, Earl Potts, Steve Iavarone and Paddy Lacy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2006
At AMF Country Club Lanes in Middle River yesterday, starry-eyed children asked their heroes to autograph pins, the crowd murmured about "bump areas," and Ed Austin and Shannon Barnes stood by the Lustre King ball-polishing machine, discussing their joy that the Professional Bowlers Association Tour had returned to the Baltimore area. "It's the love of the game," said Austin, a Bel Air resident, as he turned so pro bowler Ryan Shafer could sign the back of his T-shirt. "We grew up with this game."
Advertisement
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 3, 1993
Both men and women are popping pins in midseason form at Mount Airy Lanes, and one of Carroll County's young tenpin bowlers soon will be entering the difficult world of the Professional Bowlers Association.Steve Rothenberger lives in Westminster and bowls in Carroll County and in Hanover and York, Pa. Next month he'll celebrate his 22nd birthday and within a few weeks should receive his PBA card."I'm putting in my application for the Professional Bowlers Association card," he said, "And when I get it I'll start bowling in regional PBA events."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Enella Saunders and Enella Saunders,New York Times Syndicate | April 10, 2000
The world's first bowling robot hunkers down in an alley in Muskegon, Mich., plotting its next strike. Ten feet high and 20 feet long, with an arm the size of a howitzer and springs like rocket launchers, Throbot weighs more than 8 tons. Stored in its Pentium-powered brain are tens of thousands of throws by dozens of human bowlers, their exact spin, velocity and position recorded by video cameras, ultrasonic and infrared sensors, and a computer-aided tracking system. "It's kind of scary," says Bill Orlikowski, a professional bowler whose throws the machine often imitates.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr | February 26, 1991
Aberdeen resident Mark Bowers sometimes works at his parents' Edgewood furniture store. For the past couple of years, however, the 28-year-old bowling fanatic has gained more pleasure playing on the wood then selling it.Since 1989, Bowers has been a member of the Professional Bowlers Association Tour. What started as a hobby when he was 8 has turned into his profession."I wanted to try the tour to prove I was good enough," said Bowers, who carries a 207 competition average. "At first I didn't do so well, but after I won my first tournament, I really got better.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | May 19, 1991
There were seven 300 games and two 299 efforts in the past two weeks at Country Club Lanes.Rolling perfect games were Bill Grauling, Jerry Nowacki, Jeff Harding, Jerry Hosza, Paul Manuel, Robin Gee and Chuck Tillman. Missing perfection by one pin were Steve Berkett and Robin Whittaker. Whittaker, bowling in the Chesapeake Mixed League, also had a 744 set, and Gee, rolling the Starfires League, had a 745 set.Irv Roswall rolled a 298 game and Mike Jeffries rolled a 297 in the Baltimore Men's Scratch Classic League, also at Country Club Lanes, and Lance Hunsinger rolled an 803 series in the Scratch Triples League.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 18, 1990
Tim Moor, bowling at Harford Lanes in Aberdeen, rolled 32 of a possible 36 strikes in setting a Harford-Cecil Bowling Association record for a three-game set early last week. His scores were 297, 256 and 300 for an 853 set.* Mike Bowers, bowling Monday in the Baltimore Scratch Classic League at Country Club Lanes, rolled games of 288, 279 and 277 for an 844 series, breaking the house record for a three-game set by 13 pins. Bowers was bowling with the Maryland Home Furnishings team, which had the high set for the night, 2,979.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | August 16, 1992
Angie Brown and Craig Nauman finished in first place in the 12-team County Lanes Summer Adult/Youth league. First place is a familiar position for Angie Brown; time after time she has captured first place honors in tenpin youth tournaments.Now Angie has her sights set on the Ladies Professional Bowlers Tour.She lives in Taneytown with her parents, Sandy and Dave Brown, and will enter her senior year at Francis Scott Key High School next month. But her thoughts will be on next year and a career as a pro bowler.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | October 13, 1991
For the 23rd consecutive year, the Professional Bowlers Association tour will stop in Maryland next February.Fair Lanes Woodlawn in Baltimore will be the host to the top men bowlers in the world Feb. 16-22 in the $150,000 PBA Open, with a top prize of $23,000.Pete Weber is the defending champion. Weber won the championship when Del Ballard needed seven pins on his final ball and rolled a gutter ball. Local pro Danny Wiseman, from Parkville, won the tournament two years ago.The tournament will feature youth and adult pro-am events Feb. 16 and 18 and the preliminary rounds of the tournament will begin Feb. 19 and run through Feb. 22 with the finals televised nationally on ABC."
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | February 16, 1992
Bowlers who don't compete in tournaments are missing out on fun and excitement.Many believe tournaments are only for the scratch bowlers -- the exceptionally gifted amateur or professional bowlers.But tournaments are available for folks at all levels: the casualbowler, the one-league-a-week competitor and for more accomplished bowlers.What stops many people from bowling in tournaments is the fear that they'll look foolish, that they don't have the proper equipment or they just don't know what to expect.
SPORTS
By DON VITEK | October 3, 1993
Both men and women are popping pins in midseason form at Mount Airy Lanes, and one of Carroll County's young tenpin bowlers soon will be entering the difficult world of the Professional Bowlers Association.Steve Rothenberger lives in Westminster and bowls in Carroll County and in Hanover and York, Pa. Next month he'll celebrate his 22nd birthday and within a few weeks should receive his PBA card."I'm putting in my application for the Professional Bowlers Association card," he said, "And when I get it I'll start bowling in regional PBA events."
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | August 16, 1992
Angie Brown and Craig Nauman finished in first place in the 12-team County Lanes Summer Adult/Youth league. First place is a familiar position for Angie Brown; time after time she has captured first place honors in tenpin youth tournaments.Now Angie has her sights set on the Ladies Professional Bowlers Tour.She lives in Taneytown with her parents, Sandy and Dave Brown, and will enter her senior year at Francis Scott Key High School next month. But her thoughts will be on next year and a career as a pro bowler.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | August 13, 1992
The women professional bowlers were in town. And no one who watched them at Greenway Bowl Odenton will forget them very quickly.They were courteous, they were affable and they were just a pleasure to be around. They were also awesome on the lanes.They included bowlers such as Debbie Kuhn of Harford County and Carol Tarcey of Jessup, Roxie Nicholson of Arlington, Va., and Ronnie DeShields of Owings Mills.Some names that serious bowlers will recognize immediately:* Carolyn Dorin, known as Spike, the recent winner of the LPBT National Doubles title; Collegiate All-American for three years running.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | May 28, 1992
Marshall Battaglia has been bowling duckpins for 15 of his 24 years. This year he entered his first tournament, the Coors Cutter $25,000 Duckpin Classic.After his experience in that, he'll be entering more tournaments, that's for sure.Battaglia had to qualify at Fair Lanes Southwest, his home center, for the national finals on May 16 and 17 at T-Bowl Lanes in Newington, Conn. He did that and made the long trip to Connecticut. He finished third out of a field of 135 men's finalists.In the stepladder finals, Battaglia defeated Jim Mowrey of Berwyn Heights, 165-161.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | February 16, 1992
Bowlers who don't compete in tournaments are missing out on fun and excitement.Many believe tournaments are only for the scratch bowlers -- the exceptionally gifted amateur or professional bowlers.But tournaments are available for folks at all levels: the casualbowler, the one-league-a-week competitor and for more accomplished bowlers.What stops many people from bowling in tournaments is the fear that they'll look foolish, that they don't have the proper equipment or they just don't know what to expect.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | November 10, 1991
Duckpin bowling is attempting to unseat jousting as the official Maryland state sport, and two good reasons for the change will be contested today in Essex.Two of the major duckpin events in the nation will be bowled at XTC Fair Lanes Middlesex, bringing together the top male and youth bowlers in the country.The Duckpin Professional Bowlers Association Masters Tournament finals, pitting the leading male duckpin bowlers in the world, will be bowled beginning at 9 a.m. and the U.S. Youth Duckpin Invitational Championship, featuring the top boys and girls duckpinners in the nation, will be bowled starting at 10 a.m.Among the entrants in the Masters tournament will be Mike Steinert, Buddy Creamer, John Schramm, Eddie Darling, Bill Honeycutt, Scott Wolgamuth, George Young, Wayne Catlin, Earl Potts, Steve Iavarone and Paddy Lacy.
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | September 8, 1991
For the third consecutive year, membership in the American Bowling Congress has declined. The ABC, the national governing body for tenpin bowling, had its membership drop to 2,922,829 during the 1990-91 season, down from 3,036,907 -- a loss of 3.7 percent -- from the 1989-90 season.Darold Dobs, ABC executive director, attributes this decline to several factors: the loss of 121 bowling centers, the loss of 32 local bowling associations and general overall decline in the nation's economy."We are not pleased with our continuing membership decline, however it is the lowest in the last three seasons," Dobs said.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | May 9, 1991
Walt Cervenka, owner and operator of Walt Cervenka's Ritchie Pro Shop, has made it easier for bowlers with hand and wrist problems to be competitive.Cervenka is drilling balls for touring professionals,such as Danny Wiseman, Joe Firpo, Steve Cook, Dave Bolles, Brad Snell, Darryl Bower and John Forst."
SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | October 13, 1991
For the 23rd consecutive year, the Professional Bowlers Association tour will stop in Maryland next February.Fair Lanes Woodlawn in Baltimore will be the host to the top men bowlers in the world Feb. 16-22 in the $150,000 PBA Open, with a top prize of $23,000.Pete Weber is the defending champion. Weber won the championship when Del Ballard needed seven pins on his final ball and rolled a gutter ball. Local pro Danny Wiseman, from Parkville, won the tournament two years ago.The tournament will feature youth and adult pro-am events Feb. 16 and 18 and the preliminary rounds of the tournament will begin Feb. 19 and run through Feb. 22 with the finals televised nationally on ABC."
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | September 22, 1991
There are many paths to the professional bowling circuit, but Keith Lescalleet probably found one of the best ways: be born into the bowling industry.His folks once owned Westminster Lanes -- now known as County Lanes. Now 27, Lescalleet started bowling tenpins when he was 12.Lescalleet already has one of the attributes needed by professional bowlers -- the ability to score big when it counts.His high series of 781 was thrown in a tournament and netted him a $500 prize. He has a 300 game to his credit and on Sept.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.