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NEWS
July 29, 1993
It is all but unimaginable that a non-competitive, off-season shoot-around could kill a basketball All-Star, a man who had played in hundreds of pressure-packed contests in high school, college and six years in the pros. But, in fact, it is not impossible. It happened to Reggie Lewis of Baltimore Tuesday night.Here's a man who had been playing basketball for most of his 27 years, and at the highest levels.He didn't just play on a routinely great Dunbar High team; he played on possibly the greatest prep team of all time, the only one to have three of its players selected in the first round of the professional basketball draft.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Almost two years have passed since the NCAA men's lacrosse rules committee announced it would add a 30-second "timer on" countdown to combat stalling and slow play in men's lacrosse. And in the ensuing seasons, it's become clear that the timer is not a magical cure and that further changes need examination. In a column this week for Inside Lacrosse, analyst and Baltimore Sun contributor Quint Kessenich compares the evolution of lacrosse to that of basketball: The shot clock for professional basketball was invented by Syracuse Nationals owner Danny Biasone following the 1954 season in an attempt to speed up the game and prevent teams from stalling.
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SPORTS
By Steve Jacobson and Steve Jacobson,Newsday | February 13, 1994
His championships came in an era preserved by the flattop haircut Buddy Jeannette wears at age 76, when the basketball he watches hardly resembles the basketball he learned. Carol Blazejowski's championship came Wednesday.On the road from Fond du Lac to Sheboygan there were six of them in a 1928 Pierce Arrow with no lights. "The lights just went out," Jeannette recalled. "Boy, oh boy, lucky we had a big moon."That was pro basketball.Blazejowski carries the identification "Blaze" like Magic or Larry.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Former Maryland guard Terrell Stoglin thinks he was wrongly portrayed, on and off the court, in College Park, and seems confident he will get a chance to change his image in the NBA. Displaying the same bravado that helped the barely 6-foot guard lead the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring as a sophomore - not to mention exhibit the candor that sometimes got him into trouble - Stoglin said he would be surprised if he is not picked in Thursday's NBA...
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Almost two years have passed since the NCAA men's lacrosse rules committee announced it would add a 30-second "timer on" countdown to combat stalling and slow play in men's lacrosse. And in the ensuing seasons, it's become clear that the timer is not a magical cure and that further changes need examination. In a column this week for Inside Lacrosse, analyst and Baltimore Sun contributor Quint Kessenich compares the evolution of lacrosse to that of basketball: The shot clock for professional basketball was invented by Syracuse Nationals owner Danny Biasone following the 1954 season in an attempt to speed up the game and prevent teams from stalling.
SPORTS
By Kaija Langley and Kaija Langley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 19, 1999
Barely a week out of school, girls from around the city traded in their textbooks for blue-and-yellow basketballs at the Coppin Center.More than three dozen athletes, ages 8 through 17, attended the first annual Coppin State College Girls' Basketball Camp this week. For many young players, the day camp was their first opportunity to attend a basketball camp. For others, it was a chance to hone their skills away from the male-dominated neighborhood courts.Tammy Rogers, a point guard who will enter the seventh grade, hopes to have a future in professional basketball.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY and JERRY BEMBRY,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
It started with a brief, one-year stint in the NBA with the New Jersey Nets, followed by a tour of small-town America in the Continental Basketball Association and most recently a four-year career in Helsinki, Finland.And yet, despite playing professional basketball for nine years, former Dunbar and Towson State star Kurk Lee has had one regret."I've always wanted to come home and play before my family and friends," Lee said earlier this week. "The only time they've really seen me play has been from tapes.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
In an apartment in the middle of Segovia, Spain, Dawn Staley spends most of her days waiting for basketball practice to start.There are worse things than to be a gifted basketball player who sleeps all day, practices for a few hours, plays once a week and collects $2,000 a month for the trouble.It's just that Staley, who was the top player in women's college basketball the past two years at Virginia, expected so much more."It's kind of hard," she said. "Sometimes, I get frustrated and I'm ready to pack my bags and go, and I think it's not even worth it. But I think anybody over in the States would trade places with me for the money.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 27, 1999
One loss is enough. Fire coach Herb Brown. Sign new players. Toss the mascot -- Bagel, Bayzl, whatever his name is -- into the Inner Harbor.When will the owner act?Oops, forgot.The owner -- er, part-owner -- is Cal Ripken.Seriously, no one in the announced crowd of 9,000 seemed too upset with the BayRunners' 107-95 loss to the hated Trenton Shooting Stars last night in their International Basketball League debut.It was a fun opening to a new chapter in the city's sports history, and unlike when the Canadian Football League came to town in 1993, no one had to learn the rules.
NEWS
By Earl Strom | May 11, 1992
IT'S PLAYOFF time in the National Basketball Association. And thanks to David Stern, the league's commissioner, the NBA has had another season of financial and popular success. Yet as a former referee who watched from center court as the league grew and changed, I wonder if the NBA hasn't become a victim of its own good fortune.In some ways, it seems to have struck a Faustian bargain, trading artful basketball for big bucks. Before 1979, the NBA struggled to gain legitimate big league status -- and the lucrative national TV contracts that go with it. Fortunately, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Michael Jordan gave the league the personable and exciting stars necessary to help its financial ascent.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | November 27, 1999
One loss is enough. Fire coach Herb Brown. Sign new players. Toss the mascot -- Bagel, Bayzl, whatever his name is -- into the Inner Harbor.When will the owner act?Oops, forgot.The owner -- er, part-owner -- is Cal Ripken.Seriously, no one in the announced crowd of 9,000 seemed too upset with the BayRunners' 107-95 loss to the hated Trenton Shooting Stars last night in their International Basketball League debut.It was a fun opening to a new chapter in the city's sports history, and unlike when the Canadian Football League came to town in 1993, no one had to learn the rules.
SPORTS
By Kaija Langley and Kaija Langley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 19, 1999
Barely a week out of school, girls from around the city traded in their textbooks for blue-and-yellow basketballs at the Coppin Center.More than three dozen athletes, ages 8 through 17, attended the first annual Coppin State College Girls' Basketball Camp this week. For many young players, the day camp was their first opportunity to attend a basketball camp. For others, it was a chance to hone their skills away from the male-dominated neighborhood courts.Tammy Rogers, a point guard who will enter the seventh grade, hopes to have a future in professional basketball.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY and JERRY BEMBRY,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
It started with a brief, one-year stint in the NBA with the New Jersey Nets, followed by a tour of small-town America in the Continental Basketball Association and most recently a four-year career in Helsinki, Finland.And yet, despite playing professional basketball for nine years, former Dunbar and Towson State star Kurk Lee has had one regret."I've always wanted to come home and play before my family and friends," Lee said earlier this week. "The only time they've really seen me play has been from tapes.
SPORTS
By Steve Jacobson and Steve Jacobson,Newsday | February 13, 1994
His championships came in an era preserved by the flattop haircut Buddy Jeannette wears at age 76, when the basketball he watches hardly resembles the basketball he learned. Carol Blazejowski's championship came Wednesday.On the road from Fond du Lac to Sheboygan there were six of them in a 1928 Pierce Arrow with no lights. "The lights just went out," Jeannette recalled. "Boy, oh boy, lucky we had a big moon."That was pro basketball.Blazejowski carries the identification "Blaze" like Magic or Larry.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
It is all but unimaginable that a non-competitive, off-season shoot-around could kill a basketball All-Star, a man who had played in hundreds of pressure-packed contests in high school, college and six years in the pros. But, in fact, it is not impossible. It happened to Reggie Lewis of Baltimore Tuesday night.Here's a man who had been playing basketball for most of his 27 years, and at the highest levels.He didn't just play on a routinely great Dunbar High team; he played on possibly the greatest prep team of all time, the only one to have three of its players selected in the first round of the professional basketball draft.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
In an apartment in the middle of Segovia, Spain, Dawn Staley spends most of her days waiting for basketball practice to start.There are worse things than to be a gifted basketball player who sleeps all day, practices for a few hours, plays once a week and collects $2,000 a month for the trouble.It's just that Staley, who was the top player in women's college basketball the past two years at Virginia, expected so much more."It's kind of hard," she said. "Sometimes, I get frustrated and I'm ready to pack my bags and go, and I think it's not even worth it. But I think anybody over in the States would trade places with me for the money.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Former Maryland guard Terrell Stoglin thinks he was wrongly portrayed, on and off the court, in College Park, and seems confident he will get a chance to change his image in the NBA. Displaying the same bravado that helped the barely 6-foot guard lead the Atlantic Coast Conference in scoring as a sophomore - not to mention exhibit the candor that sometimes got him into trouble - Stoglin said he would be surprised if he is not picked in Thursday's NBA...
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen and Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jacques Kelly and librarian Doris Carberry contributed to this article | November 20, 1994
In the early years of this century, when Cab Calloway was growing up in West Baltimore's Sugar Hill, the neighborhood his family called home was considered the political, cultural and business hub of black society.He was the son of middle-class professionals. His mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a Morgan State College graduate who taught school. His father, Cabell Calloway, graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and worked as a lawyer.Young Cab Calloway even had his own car in high school -- a used 1923 Oldsmobile he'd bought with $275 he'd earned working -- a rarity in that era, particularly for a black man."
NEWS
By Earl Strom | May 11, 1992
IT'S PLAYOFF time in the National Basketball Association. And thanks to David Stern, the league's commissioner, the NBA has had another season of financial and popular success. Yet as a former referee who watched from center court as the league grew and changed, I wonder if the NBA hasn't become a victim of its own good fortune.In some ways, it seems to have struck a Faustian bargain, trading artful basketball for big bucks. Before 1979, the NBA struggled to gain legitimate big league status -- and the lucrative national TV contracts that go with it. Fortunately, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Michael Jordan gave the league the personable and exciting stars necessary to help its financial ascent.
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