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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2003
Vernon Charles "Pete" Taylor, who pitched briefly for the Orioles' major-league predecessor, the St. Louis Browns, during a 12-year career in professional baseball, died of a stroke Nov. 17 at North Arundel Hospital. He was 75 and lived in Severna Park. Mr. Taylor was born and raised in Severn, and by his sophomore year at Glen Burnie High School he was considered a standout on the mound. "When he was in high school, he had a great curve, and as he developed, he got a great fastball," said Albert "Ding" Praley, a longtime friend from Glen Burnie.
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SPORTS
Mike Klingaman | August 2, 2014
A century ago in spring training, a rawboned Orioles rookie stepped to the plate, swung from the heels and hit a fastball deep to right field. The ball landed in a rut in a cornfield, more than 400 feet from home plate. In Fayetteville, N.C., a historic marker notes the spot where George Herman Ruth, 19, hit his first professional home run in his first outing as an Oriole in 1914. He wasn't yet The Babe - teammates would pin that nickname on him within the month - but he surely was Baltimore's own. That Ruth began his career with his hometown team surprises many, sports historian Mark Millikin said.
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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson visited a West Baltimore church yesterday to whip up support for his All-Star Game protest tomorrow and to drive home his message that racism in professional baseball is a symptom of broader problems in the United States.Mr. Jackson said baseball has failed, after seven months of discussion, to implement an affirmative action plan that sets goals and timetables for minority hiring.He said the federal government's failure to require such a plan is an indication that both major political parties have retreated on civil rights, a trend he said began 12 years ago with the Reagan administration.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Professional baseball great Tony Gwynn Sr., also known as Mr. Padre, died last month of salivary gland cancer, which he believed was caused by years of using smokeless chewing tobacco. The cancer is a rare form that begins in any of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat. Two adults in 100,000 are diagnosed with salivary gland cancer each year. The chances of survival drop if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Dr. Patrick K. Ha, with Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says new types of treatments and therapies are in the works to treat the disease.
NEWS
March 11, 2005
JUST A FEW years ago, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa super-charged interest in major-league baseball with their epic seasons of home-run-hitting. Now a U.S. House committee has subpoenaed the two - along with five other current and former players - for hearings next week on the juicing of the game by steroid use. And right away, the game's leaders trotted out lawyers to argue that the seven players shouldn't be compelled to testify - in turn immediately prompting...
NEWS
April 16, 2014
The Sun has done an excellent job commemorating the 60th anniversary of the St. Louis Browns becoming the Baltimore Orioles ("The Orioles: Sixty Years in Baltimore," March 30). It was a class act for the Orioles to invite former shortstop Billy Hunter to throw the ceremonial pitch on the exact date of the first home game. Billy Hunter's outstanding double-play partner at second base was the late Bob Young, the only native Marylander to arrive in Baltimore with the former Browns.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
Matt Foster had just finished writing the most important letter of his life to the Secretary of the Navy yesterday, and it was time to sit back on the Navy baseball team bus ride to Philadelphia for a game against Temple and ponder his future. Foster, a suddenly blossoming 6-foot-3, 200-pound senior left-handed pitcher, had proposed in the letter to work many years as a Navy recruiter in exchange for an immediate opportunity to pursue a professional baseball career. "I tried to point out all the public relations advantages to the Navy to have me out there playing professional baseball," said Foster.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 10, 2002
IT'S WINTER, WHEN athletes turn their attention to sports like basketball and skiing. But Broadneck High School senior Dan Short has baseball on his mind. And he's not waiting for the warm weather to come to Maryland. His bat, his glove and his cleats are packed and ready to go, and tomorrow morning he is to board a plane headed for the Los Angeles Dodgers' spring training facility in Vero Beach, Fla. With nearly 100 other high school athletes, Short, an 18-year-old second baseman, will play in hopes of catching the eyes of college and professional baseball scouts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
Melvin L. Fisher, a letter carrier who once pitched in the New York Yankees' farm system, died Saturday of cancer at his Dundalk home. He was 80. A versatile athlete, he signed his first professional baseball contract in 1938 and played in the minor leagues until 1951. He then owned a service station and subsequently became a Postal Service letter carrier. He retired in 1980. "Mel was one of the best pitchers who ever came out of Dundalk," said Frank Usher, a friend since they played baseball as 6-year- olds.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 29, 2008
So professional baseball has been played for, what, about 140 years, give or take, and has managed to get along without the technological assistance commonly referred to as "instant replay." Now, suddenly, Major League Baseball has to have instant replay and it has to have it immediately. By immediately, we're talking yesterday. Most fans are aware that replay will be applied only to home runs - fair or foul, over the fence or still in play, fan interference or not. And it might be a good idea in concept, but what's not a good idea is the timing.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
The Sun has done an excellent job commemorating the 60th anniversary of the St. Louis Browns becoming the Baltimore Orioles ("The Orioles: Sixty Years in Baltimore," March 30). It was a class act for the Orioles to invite former shortstop Billy Hunter to throw the ceremonial pitch on the exact date of the first home game. Billy Hunter's outstanding double-play partner at second base was the late Bob Young, the only native Marylander to arrive in Baltimore with the former Browns.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | April 5, 2014
It may have taken decades for Major League Baseball to come around to the idea of using video review to confirm or overturn questionable umpiring decisions, but it didn't take Orioles manager Buck Showalter very long to come up with a plan to make the most of the new, expanded replay system. If you're going to successfully navigate a new program that is designed to second-guess the baseball world's best umpires, who better to put in front of the replay monitor than someone who had worked as an umpire himself?
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Orioles Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. makes no secret that his desire to get back into the game is at its highest level since his playing days ended. But for Ripken, a homegrown kid who became as identifiable with Baltimore and the Orioles organization as the bird itself, following any desire to get back into professional baseball would likely mean wearing a uniform other than that of the Orioles for the first time in his career. Then there's the idea of possibly joining the Washington Nationals, the Orioles' regional rival to the south, with whom he has been linked recently despite saying that he hasn't been approached yet by the team.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
When the Orioles sent outfielder-designated hitter Henry Urrutia back to Triple-A Norfolk after Friday night's loss to the Colorado Rockies, it ended the Cuban defector's first stint in major league baseball. After batting .365 in the minor leagues, Urrutia hit .269 in 52 at-bats over 21 games with the Orioles with only one extra-base hit. He had three multihit performances, including a three-hit night July 22 in his second career start at Kansas City. “I think Henry needs to go back and get where he was, and he will,” manager Buck Showalter said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette said Tuesday that pitching prospect Kevin Gausman is not a candidate to fill the team's two vacant starting pitcher spots over the next week. With starters Miguel Gonzalez and Wei-Yin Chen on the disabled list, the Orioles have rotation spots to fill on Saturday and Tuesday.  “Gausman is doing fine,” Duquette said. “I'm going to tell you. He's not a candidate for us to recall. He's doing fine at Double-A and he's getting used to professional baseball.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
Stanley Oppenheim, a retired food products salesman, died of diabetic complications Nov. 11 at his Lutherville home. He was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Baltimore Street and on Towanda Avenue, he was a 1956 graduate of Forest Park High School. Family members said he earned 11 varsity letters, including football, basketball and baseball. He was named to the Maryland Scholastic Association's first team. In his senior year, he led an MSA scoring record in both football and basketball.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette said Tuesday that pitching prospect Kevin Gausman is not a candidate to fill the team's two vacant starting pitcher spots over the next week. With starters Miguel Gonzalez and Wei-Yin Chen on the disabled list, the Orioles have rotation spots to fill on Saturday and Tuesday.  “Gausman is doing fine,” Duquette said. “I'm going to tell you. He's not a candidate for us to recall. He's doing fine at Double-A and he's getting used to professional baseball.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
When the Orioles sent outfielder-designated hitter Henry Urrutia back to Triple-A Norfolk after Friday night's loss to the Colorado Rockies, it ended the Cuban defector's first stint in major league baseball. After batting .365 in the minor leagues, Urrutia hit .269 in 52 at-bats over 21 games with the Orioles with only one extra-base hit. He had three multihit performances, including a three-hit night July 22 in his second career start at Kansas City. “I think Henry needs to go back and get where he was, and he will,” manager Buck Showalter said.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 29, 2008
So professional baseball has been played for, what, about 140 years, give or take, and has managed to get along without the technological assistance commonly referred to as "instant replay." Now, suddenly, Major League Baseball has to have instant replay and it has to have it immediately. By immediately, we're talking yesterday. Most fans are aware that replay will be applied only to home runs - fair or foul, over the fence or still in play, fan interference or not. And it might be a good idea in concept, but what's not a good idea is the timing.
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