Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProfessional Athletes
IN THE NEWS

Professional Athletes

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | March 5, 2006
I LIVE IN A COUNTY WHERE many parents think their sons or daughters will receive an athletic scholarship or professional contract. These kids participate in their sports year-round, and if they don't, the coach tells them that they aren't going to be on the team next year. Is this bad for the kids, both emotionally and physically? What percentage of high school kids actually get scholarships? Joe O'Ferrall, Ellicott City DEAR JOE / / I'm going to take a stab at the last question first, because it really gets to the heart of the other questions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2014
What a contrast there's been in the responses by Baltimore sports teams' management to inappropriate behavior by their professional athletes ( "Manny Machado 'needs to re-establish himself as a big leaguer,' Dan Duquette says," June 10). Here we have Mr. Machado, whose misbehavior involved slinging a bat down the third base line, and general manager Dan Duquette is already talking about sending him back to the minors. Then we have Ray Rice, who by all accounts knocked his then girlfriend out cold, and the Ravens' response is not to respond at all. Other then the sanctions by the NFL, Mr. Rice faces no repercussions from the Ravens organization.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | December 4, 2008
Two points: First of all, Bill, nice picture. Unfortunately, Goodfellas stopped filming 20 years ago. Second, the only thing dumber than this question is your ill-thought, the-Russians-are-coming answer. This isn't Red Dawn. And it's time our athletes stopped acting like it. I'm a major proponent of athletes protecting themselves. I think they should do what everyone else does: avoid dangerous situations. For example - and my only regret is that I couldn't share this with Plaxico Burress a week ago - maybe shady New York City nightclubs aren't the best places for married fathers to be in the wee hours of morning.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith took to his new blog Wednesday to show support for University of Missouri defensive end Michael Sam, who came out publicly Sunday night . "I would personally like to applaud Michael Sam for being the first in this profession to be open and honest about his sexuality," Smith wrote. "This shows his courage and strength. " Sam, whose announcement of his sexual orientation first appeared in The New York Times and ESPN, is poised to become the NFL's first openly gay player if he's selected in May's NFL draft.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES are not like the rest of us. They may be doubled over with stomach flu, but they still can lead their team to victory in a championship game, as Michael Jordan did recently.They win the Masters golf tournament even with the weight of the world pressing on their young shoulders, as 21-year-old Tiger Woods did earlier this spring.They attract thousands of people willing to wait in line 12 hours for a momentary glimpse and an autograph, as Cal Ripken Jr. found out at several book-signings recently.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Anna Seaton has a degree from Harvard, a 10-year-old Toyota pushing 100,000 miles and a resume that reads like a page from the temporary want-ads: bicycle messenger, carpenter's apprentice, nanny and waitress.But she isn't complaining.Seaton is an Olympian, a rower who trains at dawn, dreams of gold and lives on $12,000 a year."Rowing is probably one of the last amateur sports left," she said. "We're used to the economic hardship and the anonymity. But we're part of the new Olympics."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | October 14, 2001
When B.J. Surhoff plays baseball, it's for thousands of fans. When Polly Surhoff swims, she's in a world of her own. Swimming gives Polly, 37, a break from raising four children and taking care of everything at home while husband B.J., also 37, a former Oriole, plays baseball in Atlanta for the Braves. And the former college swimming champion and current open-water racer is as serious in the pool as her husband is when he steps up to the plate. Being the spouse of a professional athlete might sound glamorous, but it can be challenging.
SPORTS
By GLENN GRAHAM | October 2, 2008
Good ol' Charles Barkley has made plenty of boneheaded comments over the years, but when he defiantly stated in a Nike commercial in the early 1990s that he wasn't a role model, he was absolutely right on the money. He went on to say: "I am not paid to be a role model. I am paid to wreak havoc on a basketball court. Just because I can dunk a basketball does not mean I should raise your kids." For all the good guys who do community service and reach out to today's youth, the likes of Cal Ripken Jr. and Warrick Dunn to name a couple, there seem to be twice as many poor examples, such as Adam Jones of the Dallas Cowboys, Michael Vick and Ron Artest.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
In the ever-competitive business of health care, Union Memorial Hospital has taken a shot at a marketing coup with legendary golfer Arnold Palmer lending his name to the hospital's sports medicine program. Palmer took a break yesterday from the Constellation Energy Classic at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley to announce the establishment of the Arnold Palmer SportsHealth Center at the Baltimore hospital. Union Memorial hopes that Palmer, playing in his first tournament in almost a year and just days after his 77th birthday, will provide an example for other professional athletes and "weekend warriors."
SPORTS
By Julie Cart and Randy Harvey and Julie Cart and Randy Harvey,Los Angeles Times | November 10, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- The prominent NBA player met a beautiful young woman after a road game at a restaurant near the arena and, after a few drinks, asked if he could go home with her. She agreed, with one condition. In return for her companionship, he had to give her a pair of autographed sneakers.When they arrived at her bedroom, he fulfilled his part of the agreement, producing the shoes from his shoulder bag and signing them."She took them to her closet and opened the door," he said, laughing about the story while he told it to a reporter a couple of years later.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
As someone who has spent more than 50 years in education and, more importantly, in developing the character of the young men who passed through Boys' Latin's doors, Richard Sherman's outburst after the Seattle Seahawks victory saddens me greatly ( "Richard Sherman was out of line," Jan. 20). Many of our professional athletes fail to recognize they are role models for the fans of all ages. Mr. Sherman's outburst is another glaring example of a complete failure to win with grace and humility.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Under Armour, in a race to expand its brand globally, opened its first-ever Under Armour Experience, a blend of retail store and promotional venue, in Shanghai, China. Kevin Plank, founder and CEO of the Baltimore-based athletic apparel maker, hosted the grand opening Friday of the new store with Olympic swimming superstar Michael Phelps , at the Jing An Kerry Centre. The store uses a multi-dimensional short film to immerse visitors in the Under Armour brand and mission of "making athletes better through passion and innovation," the company said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo and Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, two of the NFL's most outspoken advocates of gay marriage, have taken their fight to the highest court. The two filed an amicus curiae brief to the Supreme Court of the United States on Thursday that contends that California's Proposition 8, which says "only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California," is unconstitutional. The brief also discusses the important role that professional athletes have in promoting tolerance.
NEWS
By Rich Polt | October 29, 2012
Earlier this month, Lance Armstrong participated in a triathlon in Columbia, benefiting the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. Despite some poor weather, the event was an overwhelming success. People turned out in droves to watch Mr. Armstrong compete and to hear him speak at Centennial High School. Like the spectators in Columbia and so many other people around the country, I am not prepared to write off Lance Armstrong as just the latest in a long line of professional athletes who have fallen from grace.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Each week, blogger Matt Vensel fires a few questions at rookie cornerback and kick returner Asa Jackson. The Ravens' fifth-round pick in April's draft, Jackson is a Sacramento native who played his college ball at Cal Poly. MV: Have you been getting any of that special rookie treatment from your teammates? AJ: A little bit. I have to carry their stuff off the field. I have to run out and get chicken when we go on road trips. That's as bad as it has been. It hasn't been anything too crazy.
SPORTS
By From staff and news services | March 25, 2011
Consumer advocate Ralph Nader is calling for the elimination of college athletic scholarships, saying the move is necessary to "de-professionalize" college athletes. "As we near the exciting conclusion of 'March Madness' — which would more accurately be described as the 2011 NCAA Professional Basketball Championships — it's time we step back and finally address the myth of amateurism surrounding big-time college football and basketball in this country," said Nader, whose League of Fans is proposing that the scholarships be replaced with need-based financial aid. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the proposal Thursday, ahead of its official release.
SPORTS
November 6, 2004
Terrell Owens' antics Sunday gave me a completely different opinion of the man. In the past, although I do not condone conceit, I was somewhat amused by his flamboyance - the Sharpie stunt, the pom-pom stunt. Even dancing on the Dallas star at midfield, though disrespectful, was amusing and not hurtful toward a person. On the other hand, by mocking Baltimore's beloved Ray Lewis by doing his dance ritual after scoring, Owens proved he was disrespectful toward an individual, conceited and hurtful.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | October 2, 2008
Should professional athletes be role models for kids? Why is there even a question? Whether we want them to be or not, they are. And whether they want to be or not, they are. When I was growing up, I wanted to play tennis like Billie Jean King. My stepson, Jordan (Jordy to his friends), is named for Michael Jordan and wants to play basketball like the late NBA Hall of Famer "Pistol" Pete Maravich or Dirk Nowitzki, currently of the Dallas Mavericks.. Professional athletes have everything kids want: skill, talent, popularity and money.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2010
Austin Story doesn't remember the late-summer outing at a friend's lakefront home in New Jersey, or the rocks he climbed near a waterfall. Or how he lost his footing and, as his horrified mother looked on, fell about 50 feet. The 14-year-old lay motionless with a traumatic brain injury as his father tried to get him off the rocks and find help. Two months later, Austin is still being treated at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, though he has learned again to walk and talk.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
For nearly a week, dozens of Maryland youths have rubbed elbows with the pros on the football field, picked their brains and even caught a glimpse of a real Super Bowl ring. But they also took time to talk about the challenges they face daily: choices about drugs, about girls, about school. The 80 or so boys and young men participated in a new football camp called Commitment 4 Change, which aims to teach children from ages 8 to 17 how to better play the game - and equip them with what they need to succeed both on and off the field.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.