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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1996
After the Bandits failed on a couple of early power-play tries and longtime Baltimore nemesis Mitch Lamoureux scored for Providence midway through the first period, it looked as if it would be a long night for the home team and the second-largest crowd of the season (7,058).Baltimore's record at the Arena (10-16-4 before last night) didn't appear to be cause for overwhelming confidence, either.Then the Bandits began to roll, specifically the trio that has qualified lately to be tabbed the Production Line.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The Pepsi plant in Baltimore will no longer make soda, and the company plans to lay off 77 people as officials have decided to stop manufacturing operations — a decision they blame in part on a controversial new beverage tax in the city. The last cans and 2-liter bottles of Pepsi-Cola, Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew and other sodas ran through the production line Monday morning. Executives at Pepsi Beverages Co. told workers in meetings later in the day that production would be halted for good.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 4, 1997
SEATTLE -- Boeing Co., showing how badly it was caught off guard by the global boom in aircraft orders, said yesterday that it will halt production of its 747 and 737 jetliners for about three weeks to catch up with crippling labor and parts shortages.The moves mean that the world's largest airplane maker will deliver about 335 jets this year, down from the 350 earlier estimated, and that fourth-quarter earnings will be lower than expected.Boeing's drastic measures indicate that its production problems are far more severe than executives had let on, analysts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
The website listed the address as 300 E. Lombard St., and sure enough, when we arrived, a prominent sign assured us we had landed at those very coordinates. But there was no sign, literally or figuratively, of Rosina Gourmet. Pluckily, we entered the office building that didn't look anything like a gourmet sandwich shop. If ever a place resembled an office lobby and not a restaurant, this is tit. In fact it looks exactly like the Alex Brown Realty Inc. office building it purports to be and not a sandwich shop at all. After a moment of complete disorientation we asked a kind receptionist what happened to the restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
The website listed the address as 300 E. Lombard St., and sure enough, when we arrived, a prominent sign assured us we had landed at those very coordinates. But there was no sign, literally or figuratively, of Rosina Gourmet. Pluckily, we entered the office building that didn't look anything like a gourmet sandwich shop. If ever a place resembled an office lobby and not a restaurant, this is tit. In fact it looks exactly like the Alex Brown Realty Inc. office building it purports to be and not a sandwich shop at all. After a moment of complete disorientation we asked a kind receptionist what happened to the restaurant.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 26, 1994
HAZELWOOD, Mo. -- Ten months ago, it was an impossible if not laughable proposition -- stretching Ford's St. Louis Assembly Plant to build Aerostar minivans and Explorer sport-utility vehicles on the same production line.No one's laughing now.The $674 million investment is giving Ford unparalleled flexibility in assembling the hot-selling light trucks."Every day I walk in here, it's mind-boggling what we're doing," said John Sherlock, president and chairman of United Auto Workers Local 325. "There's people on the outside saying 'You ** couldn't do this' who are starting to be believers now because it's coming together."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 16, 1993
General Motors Corp. is seeking to boost daily production of its popular midsize vans made here by 6 percent with no increase in employment, a move that union officials say could lead to a strike at the city's largest manufacturing employer."
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Army wants to replenish an already enormous supply of tank-killing weapons by buying more than 2,100 laser-guided Hellfire missiles now instead of next year, when a new improved version starts coming off the production line.The decision has baffled investigators at the General Accounting Office, who were told by senior Defense Department and Army officials in May that the Army would wait for the newer version of the missile. Congress had just given the Army $86.6 million to replace the Hellfire missiles used in the Persian Gulf war."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The Pepsi plant in Baltimore will no longer make soda, and the company plans to lay off 77 people as officials have decided to stop manufacturing operations — a decision they blame in part on a controversial new beverage tax in the city. The last cans and 2-liter bottles of Pepsi-Cola, Diet Pepsi, Mountain Dew and other sodas ran through the production line Monday morning. Executives at Pepsi Beverages Co. told workers in meetings later in the day that production would be halted for good.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | March 27, 1994
The Easter Bunny is hard at work these days, producing the super-sweet array of rainbow-colored jelly beans, yellow-frosted marshmallow chicks and all manner of chocolate eggs and rabbits to fill the baskets of youngsters and the not so young.Richard Rudell is definitely not the Easter Bunny, but he is a dedicated assistant of that vernal rabbit in making this season a sweeter one for those with a taste for chocolate.Mr. Rudell's Log Cabin Candies on Bel Air Road (U.S. 1) in Fallston is in its peak sales and production period, when candy sales nationwide reach their height.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Expanding waistlines might not be good for the nation's health, but it could mean a new revenue stream for men's clothier Jos. A. Bank. The Hampstead retail chain is bringing its line of clothing for "portly" and tall men to more of its stores and expanding its product line for online sales. The company, which for several years has offered a limited selection of items for the big-and-tall set, such as longer neckties and larger-size dress shirts, said that population is one that has been underserved.
NEWS
By Gail Appleson and Gail Appleson,Mcclatchy-Tribune | February 11, 2007
Tim Fisk is a 61-year-old farmer and probably one of the last men you'd expect to find looking for skin-care products from L'Oreal Paris, maker of Endless Kissable lipstick, Volume Shocking mascara and Feria shimmering hair color. But Fisk turned into a L'Oreal fan during a visit to his local Walgreens, where he discovered Men's Expert Vita Lift with SPF 15. The label describes the L'Oreal product as an "anti-wrinkle and firming moisturizer." "I've been out in the sun my whole life. I went without a shirt for 30 years," said Fisk.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
On Wal-Mart's aisle of educational toys and children's learning materials, dozens of brightly packaged products and cartoon-infused titles vie for parents' attention and a slice of their pocketbooks. There's the LeapFrog electronic writing pad, Dora the Explorer learning kits, SpongeBob SquarePants education games - and an old brand fighting to be new again. More than a decade past the peak of the backlash against "whole language" reading instruction that propelled Hooked on Phonics into infomercial ubiquity, Baltimore-based Educate Inc. is aggressively reintroducing the brand as an educational products line at mass retailers and discount clubs.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
Johnson Controls Inc., a seat-supplier to General Motors Corp.'s Southeast Baltimore assembly plant, sold a production line at its Belcamp facility in Harford County and plans to lay off 100 workers - about two-thirds of its work force - beginning next month. But Johnson will keep open another production line at the plant - with 50 remaining workers - that makes seats for the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans made at the Broening Highway plant, a company spokeswoman said yesterday. Johnson's Debra Lacey said the Milwaukee, Wis.-based company sold the Belcamp foam production line to the Woodbridge Foam Corp.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
Glamorous even in denim, B. Smith plumbs the crustacean mysteries of Bo Brooks' kitchen in Canton. Powdered for prime time, Chris Hannan, manager of the family-owned restaurant, explains to Smith the difference in taste between jimmies and females, while a glistening pile of large blue crabs wriggle on a stainless steel counter. Entering its sixth season, the half-hour, syndicated show, B. Smith with Style, has come to Baltimore on a brilliant late summer day to discover one of the city's most telegenic commodities.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2002
A Baltimore consulting firm wants more Maryland manufacturers to take part in producing the medical devices used by the state's lucrative health industry. Bottom Line Connection hopes a consortium it is creating will make it easier for small Maryland companies to enter the field, keeping more of the business in the state. "There's a lot of medical development going on in the state, and a lot of the companies that produce the components used in this development are from out of state," said J. Morris Binder, Bottom Line's president.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | February 13, 1996
ONCE UPON a time, newspaper reporters waited patiently in drafty stations to see and record who was coming and who was going on the railroad's crack trains. It was considered legitimate news during the belle epoque of rail travel that celebrated in addition to flesh and fame, steam, steel and speed.The names of the fast limiteds -- the Capitol Limited, the Black Diamond, the Seminole, the Liberty Limited, the State of Maine, the Spirit of St. Louis, the Royal Blue -- managed to etch themselves into the psyche and fabric of American life.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 14, 1995
NORFOLK, Va. -- Ford is increasing by 50 percent the number of car and truck models it will introduce over the next five years in a bid for new customers that could help it become the world's leading automaker.Though executives say market share gains are not a specific goal, the addition of 16 new or redesigned cars and trucks to the 32 Ford already was planning is intended to meet customer tastes with more and different products.Chairman Alex Trotman announced the revised product program last week at Ford's annual shareholder meeting in this Virginia city.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2001
Domestic steel makers came closer yesterday to seeing implementation of the import restrictions they covet when a trade panel found that U.S. steel makers have been severely injured by imported steel. Although it doesn't address many of the issues plaguing the steel industry, the decision does pave the way for tariffs or quotas that could boost prices by limiting the amount of foreign steel sold in this country. Largely blaming cheap imports, 25 domestic steel companies have filed for bankruptcy protection since 1997, including Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
May 21, 2001
THE ENERGY PLAN unveiled last week by President Bush is much more an accommodation of the fossil-fuel industries than a blueprint for ensuring future supplies. The report, crafted by fellow oilman Vice President Cheney, will do little to meet short-term price and supply dislocations. Already, the market is responding. Refinery output is rising, more oil and natural gas wells are being drilled and power plants are being built. And, yes, higher prices are forcing Americans toward conservation.
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