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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Talk about the magic of television. HBO's "Veep" won an Art Directors Guild Award over the weekend for a most impressive act of TV transformation. Led by production designer Jim Gloster, Baltimore's Engineers Club and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport were made to stand in for Helsinki, Finland, in a Season 2 episode titled "Helsinki. " The episode features Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) on a disastrous diplomatic trip to Finland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Talk about the magic of television. HBO's "Veep" won an Art Directors Guild Award over the weekend for a most impressive act of TV transformation. Led by production designer Jim Gloster, Baltimore's Engineers Club and Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport were made to stand in for Helsinki, Finland, in a Season 2 episode titled "Helsinki. " The episode features Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) on a disastrous diplomatic trip to Finland.
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FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,New York Times News Service | June 14, 1992
Los Angeles Bo Welch began carving out a design for the film "Batman Returns" with a piece of cardboard and images of Fascist sculpture and Depression-era machine-age art churning through his mind.His first rough model was of Gotham Plaza, a bleakly futuristic and oppressively urban sendup of Rockefeller Center. The model was to provide the graphic thread for the film, the sequel to the 1989 blockbuster "Batman.""It was just a cardboard model that I hacked together, very crude and sculptural, but I knew I was on my way," says Mr. Welch, 40."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
Listen up, hon. The Baltimore of the 1950s lives, and here's how you can find it.Today at the Senator Theatre (which harks back to 1930s Baltimore -- talk about nostalgia!), native son Barry Levinson's latest cinematic love letter to Charm City, "Liberty Heights," opens. Set in 1954 and influenced by his own experiences growing up, Levinson's latest recalls a gentler time, when Pennsylvania Avenue was the center of black culture, when The Block was still The Block, and when, for a Jewish kid from Northwest Baltimore, everything east of Falls Road was uncharted territory.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
The Public Information Office for Howard County government earned seven awards in a nationwide competition sponsored by the National Association of County Information Officers.The competition recognized staff members for raising public awareness in their county government's purpose, function, programs and by providing internal support to departments through marketing and public information."It's recognition by our peers that we are doing a good job," said Kenneth Mays, administrator for the public information office.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
As workmen buzz around his $775,000 mansion, builder Gary Houston tries to explain the 20-foot spiral flume from the nursery to the basement, the stone grotto bath with waterfall, the Koi fish pond in the garage and the driving range out back. Not to mention the Ocean City sculptor building a sand castle in the garage.But such things defy logic. You won't find them in today's typical luxury home. Rather, this is the whimsical fantasy of a big kid posing as vice president and chief designer for Landmark Homes Inc. This is Gary Houston's dream home.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Even if Blaine Bunting Sr. and his son, Blaine Jr., have to travel 100 miles south from Ocean City to purchase colorful plants, there will be flowers blooming around the goldfish pond and waterfall in their display at the seaside resort's 10th annual Home, Condo and Garden Show on Easter weekend."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | January 9, 1994
There are street corners in Tokyo that don't have traffic signals, but along the most winding, desolate road, there is likely to be at least one vending machine.The machines were introduced in the mid-1960s by Kansas City, Mo.-based Vendo Co., and for a few years the company had 100 percent of an explosive market. But by 1980, it had been driven out of Japan by domestic competitors that annually introduced smaller, cheaper and better machines."First we were aggressive, but then not aggressive," said former Vendo executive Tokuhisa Hashimoto.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
Listen up, hon. The Baltimore of the 1950s lives, and here's how you can find it.Today at the Senator Theatre (which harks back to 1930s Baltimore -- talk about nostalgia!), native son Barry Levinson's latest cinematic love letter to Charm City, "Liberty Heights," opens. Set in 1954 and influenced by his own experiences growing up, Levinson's latest recalls a gentler time, when Pennsylvania Avenue was the center of black culture, when The Block was still The Block, and when, for a Jewish kid from Northwest Baltimore, everything east of Falls Road was uncharted territory.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
A bit more than four years ago, Michael Soe, 14, replaced the loaded magazine in his father's Beretta 92 Compact L handgun with an empty one and pointed the gun at his friend, Kenzo Dix, 15.As Kenzo fired a pellet gun at birds out of Michael's bedroom window in Berkeley, Calif., Michael pulled the trigger, expecting to hear a click. Instead, he heard an explosion that would reverberate more than 3,000 miles to Beretta USA's Accokeek, Md., headquarters.Kenzo Dix died, the victim of an undetected bullet in the gun's firing chamber.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 18, 1999
Like junior high school girls giving tandem makeovers at a slumber party, women encircle makeup mogul Trish McEvoy at Nordstrom in Towson Town Center.In an ultra-neat lavender turtleneck and gray wool pant combo, she is about as far from caked-on Gaboresque excess as you can get. Her lips -- rosy-pink, full and carefully drawn -- stand out against the muted pinks and beiges that finish her face.Her manner is silky and persuasive with shades of Mommie Dearest. She gives orders, or, rather, suggestions, with an elegant nag."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
A bit more than four years ago, Michael Soe, 14, replaced the loaded magazine in his father's Beretta 92 Compact L handgun with an empty one and pointed the gun at his friend, Kenzo Dix, 15.As Kenzo fired a pellet gun at birds out of Michael's bedroom window in Berkeley, Calif., Michael pulled the trigger, expecting to hear a click. Instead, he heard an explosion that would reverberate more than 3,000 miles to Beretta USA's Accokeek, Md., headquarters.Kenzo Dix died, the victim of an undetected bullet in the gun's firing chamber.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
As workmen buzz around his $775,000 mansion, builder Gary Houston tries to explain the 20-foot spiral flume from the nursery to the basement, the stone grotto bath with waterfall, the Koi fish pond in the garage and the driving range out back. Not to mention the Ocean City sculptor building a sand castle in the garage.But such things defy logic. You won't find them in today's typical luxury home. Rather, this is the whimsical fantasy of a big kid posing as vice president and chief designer for Landmark Homes Inc. This is Gary Houston's dream home.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | March 6, 1994
Even if Blaine Bunting Sr. and his son, Blaine Jr., have to travel 100 miles south from Ocean City to purchase colorful plants, there will be flowers blooming around the goldfish pond and waterfall in their display at the seaside resort's 10th annual Home, Condo and Garden Show on Easter weekend."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | January 9, 1994
There are street corners in Tokyo that don't have traffic signals, but along the most winding, desolate road, there is likely to be at least one vending machine.The machines were introduced in the mid-1960s by Kansas City, Mo.-based Vendo Co., and for a few years the company had 100 percent of an explosive market. But by 1980, it had been driven out of Japan by domestic competitors that annually introduced smaller, cheaper and better machines."First we were aggressive, but then not aggressive," said former Vendo executive Tokuhisa Hashimoto.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
The Public Information Office for Howard County government earned seven awards in a nationwide competition sponsored by the National Association of County Information Officers.The competition recognized staff members for raising public awareness in their county government's purpose, function, programs and by providing internal support to departments through marketing and public information."It's recognition by our peers that we are doing a good job," said Kenneth Mays, administrator for the public information office.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 18, 1999
Like junior high school girls giving tandem makeovers at a slumber party, women encircle makeup mogul Trish McEvoy at Nordstrom in Towson Town Center.In an ultra-neat lavender turtleneck and gray wool pant combo, she is about as far from caked-on Gaboresque excess as you can get. Her lips -- rosy-pink, full and carefully drawn -- stand out against the muted pinks and beiges that finish her face.Her manner is silky and persuasive with shades of Mommie Dearest. She gives orders, or, rather, suggestions, with an elegant nag."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 6, 2008
Forget what you've heard about the fifth and final season of The Wire, which begins tonight on HBO. Officially, what some critics have called the greatest show in the history of TV wraps up with a meditation on the evils of corporate newspaper ownership. But really, it's all about revenge. So said David Simon, creator of the much-hailed series, who before a live audience in Baltimore last April described score-settling as his creative muse. Simon was performing in Creative Alliance's storytelling series, called The Stoop, which you can hear at www.stoopstorytelling.
FEATURES
By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,New York Times News Service | June 14, 1992
Los Angeles Bo Welch began carving out a design for the film "Batman Returns" with a piece of cardboard and images of Fascist sculpture and Depression-era machine-age art churning through his mind.His first rough model was of Gotham Plaza, a bleakly futuristic and oppressively urban sendup of Rockefeller Center. The model was to provide the graphic thread for the film, the sequel to the 1989 blockbuster "Batman.""It was just a cardboard model that I hacked together, very crude and sculptural, but I knew I was on my way," says Mr. Welch, 40."
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