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By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
The year 2007 became known as "the year of the recall" when the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued warnings on 473 products, the highest annual number in a decade. Many of the voluntary recalls involved imported goods, including children's toys and jewelry that contained toxic lead-based paint. The public outcry led to passage the next year of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which put in place tougher penalties and requirements for an array of products. Inez Tenenbaum, who was sworn in to lead the commission last year, has implemented even more safeguards.
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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
The year 2007 became known as "the year of the recall" when the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued warnings on 473 products, the highest annual number in a decade. Many of the voluntary recalls involved imported goods, including children's toys and jewelry that contained toxic lead-based paint. The public outcry led to passage the next year of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which put in place tougher penalties and requirements for an array of products. Inez Tenenbaum, who was sworn in to lead the commission last year, has implemented even more safeguards.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top official for consumer product safety has asked Congress in recent days to reject legislation intended to strengthen the agency that polices thousands of consumer goods, from toys to tools. On the eve of an important Senate committee meeting to consider the legislation, Nancy A. Nord, the acting chairwoman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, has asked lawmakers in two letters not to approve the bulk of legislation that would increase the agency's authority, double its budget and sharply increase its dwindling staff.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
Here's a task that new parents should tackle after the baby shower but before the thank-you notes: Fill out product registration cards. Once an opportunity for companies to glean marketing information from consumers, product registration cards now are a means for manufacturers to promptly and directly notify families and caregivers about recalls. Under new federal law, the registration cards must be included with many infant and toddler nursery items manufactured after June 2010. "Product registration cards will not be effective if they remain in the box," said Rachel Weintraub, director of product safety and senior counsel for the public watchdog group Consumer Federation of America.
NEWS
October 6, 1993
Louis V. Fugazy, 76, a retired vice chairman of Fugazy International, parent organization of the travel, limousine and parking companies, died Sunday at New Rochelle (N.Y.) Hospital of heart failure. He was the 1935 flyweight New York City Golden Gloves champion as well as a Navy champion later. After serving in the Pacific in World War II, he rejoined the family enterprise and with his younger brother, William Denis, built it into an international travel business. After retirement from Fugazy International in 1980, he founded Louis Fugazy Associates, a travel and public-relations firm that he ran until three years ago. He also was active in the resettlement of Jewish refugees before World War II.Danny Lineweaver, 11, whose crib accident when he was 23 months old helped lead to improved product safety standards, died Sunday of pneumonia and sepsis in Alamo, Calif.
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Jim Tankersley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate and House could pass a package of laws designed to crack down on dangerous toys and other unsafe products by year's end, congressional leaders said yesterday. Sen. Richard J. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, said he is pushing to attach the product safety reforms to a farm bill the Senate is scheduled to consider before it adjourns for the year. Those reforms would include more than doubling the budget of the Consumer Product Safety Commission by 2015, increasing the agency's power to inspect and recall products and mandating additional testing for children's products.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Amid heightened concern about the safety of foreign products, the U.S. and Chinese governments agreed in writing yesterday on measures to prevent future export of Chinese-made toys containing lead paint to the United States. The pact, announced at the second U.S.-China consumer product safety summit, calls for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine to develop a comprehensive plan to assure that Chinese exports comply with a 1978 U.S. law that bans lead paint in toys.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2010
Here's a task that new parents should tackle after the baby shower but before the thank-you notes: Fill out product registration cards. Once an opportunity for companies to glean marketing information from consumers, product registration cards now are a means for manufacturers to promptly and directly notify families and caregivers about recalls. Under new federal law, the registration cards must be included with many infant and toddler nursery items manufactured after June 2010. "Product registration cards will not be effective if they remain in the box," said Rachel Weintraub, director of product safety and senior counsel for the public watchdog group Consumer Federation of America.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun reporter | August 15, 2007
Consider for a moment that a staggering 467 products were pulled off the market in the United States last year - a record-high level, according to consumer groups. It can make a consumer's head spin trying to keep up with product recalls, from all-terrain vehicles that pose a fire hazard to Cinderella earrings that contain dangerous levels of lead. Just yesterday, Mattel recalled Batman figures and Polly Pocket dolls containing magnets that can be swallowed. In June, it was defective tires and toxic toothpaste.
NEWS
August 5, 2007
Safety has a cost, and it's a cost worth paying. If American companies are going to continue to sell Chinese goods, they must do far more to ensure the safety of those goods. That could mean investing in the Chinese factories where products are made, or instituting strict guidelines with on-site inspections, paid for by the U.S. distributor. Late last week, even as Fisher-Price toys were being pulled off shelves in Europe, Southeast Asia, Australia, Japan, Mexico, Canada and the United States, American and Chinese government officials announced that they had agreed to cooperate on food and product safety.
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Jim Tankersley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Senate and House could pass a package of laws designed to crack down on dangerous toys and other unsafe products by year's end, congressional leaders said yesterday. Sen. Richard J. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, said he is pushing to attach the product safety reforms to a farm bill the Senate is scheduled to consider before it adjourns for the year. Those reforms would include more than doubling the budget of the Consumer Product Safety Commission by 2015, increasing the agency's power to inspect and recall products and mandating additional testing for children's products.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 4, 2007
It's still three weeks to Christmas, and already I've been wounded in battle. It's just a little paper cut - the result of trying to slide too large of a box into a too small of a mailing envelope, the edges of which sliced across my palm as smoothly as anything made by Gillette. I'm fine, really, no blood transfusions necessary, and as for the scarring - well, I wasn't planning on a second career as a hand model anyway. But it's a sign of things to come. We are officially in the danger zone.
NEWS
By Doug Gansler and David Kosmos | November 23, 2007
Today is "Black Friday" -- the traditional start of the holiday shopping season. As parents and other caregivers get ready for the gift-giving holidays, many may be asking: How can we be sure that the toys we buy for our children are not tainted with lead? How can we be sure they don't pose any other hazards? It's a tough question to answer. Most Americans would be surprised to learn that the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission does not test consumer products before they are offered for sale.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top official for consumer product safety has asked Congress in recent days to reject legislation intended to strengthen the agency that polices thousands of consumer goods, from toys to tools. On the eve of an important Senate committee meeting to consider the legislation, Nancy A. Nord, the acting chairwoman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, has asked lawmakers in two letters not to approve the bulk of legislation that would increase the agency's authority, double its budget and sharply increase its dwindling staff.
NEWS
By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 27, 2007
CHICAGO -- Pointing to "an inexcusable time lag," Illinois Sen. Richard J. Durbin, a Democrat, has asked the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission to explain why the agency took more than two years and the deaths of three infants before it recalled 1 million cribs for design and hardware flaws. In the wake of reports in the Chicago Tribune that the agency failed to fully investigate the death of a 9-month-old boy in California in 2005, Durbin sent a letter on Tuesday to Nancy Nord, acting head of the agency, demanding a detailed timeline of events going back to 2003 when the commission received the first complaint about a drop rail problem in a crib manufactured by Simplicity Inc. Last Friday, Simplicity and the CPSC announced the recall of 12 models of cribs sold by the company under its name as well as the Graco brand name from 1998 until May 2007.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | September 13, 2007
An article in the Sept. 13 editions of The Sun about lead in children's toys said that an initial screening test performed at The Sun's request indicated that there might be lead in a LeapFrog Fridge Farm Magnetic Animal Set. That test, done with an X-ray fluorescence machine, is considered a screening test and is not definitive. When a more sophisticated chemical test was done, as the article reported, the toy was determined to be lead-free.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | September 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration task force recommends screening the riskiest imports to prevent the safety problems that have led to recalls of millions of toys, tires and pet foods this year. The group, in a 22-page report released yesterday, also recommends, as a preventive measure, targeting for closer inspection key weak points in the production and shipment of the $2 trillion worth of clothes, electronics, seafood and other products imported into the United States each year. "Make no mistake, the recent dangers found in some imported products are warning signs to us," said Health and Human Services Secretary Michael O. Leavitt, who led the task force.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | August 15, 2007
Yesterday's recall of 9.5 million more brand-name toys made in China - on the heels of tainted pet food, contaminated toothpaste and Sesame Street toys covered with lead paint - has safety advocates demanding reforms in the way imported products sold in the U.S. are tested before they are put in stores. And some vinyl baby bibs sold at Toys "R" Us - including a store in Maryland - appear to be contaminated with lead, laboratory tests have shown, making the inexpensive bibs another example of a made-in-China product that might be a health hazard to children, The New York Times reported.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | September 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Amid heightened concern about the safety of foreign products, the U.S. and Chinese governments agreed in writing yesterday on measures to prevent future export of Chinese-made toys containing lead paint to the United States. The pact, announced at the second U.S.-China consumer product safety summit, calls for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine to develop a comprehensive plan to assure that Chinese exports comply with a 1978 U.S. law that bans lead paint in toys.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | September 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A Bush administration task force recommends screening the riskiest imports to prevent the safety problems that have led to recalls of millions of toys, tires and pet foods this year. The group, in a 22-page report released yesterday, also recommends, as a preventive measure, targeting for closer inspection key weak points in the production and shipment of the $2 trillion worth of clothes, electronics, seafood and other products imported into the United States each year. "Make no mistake, the recent dangers found in some imported products are warning signs to us," said Health and Human Services Secretary Michael O. Leavitt, who led the task force.
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