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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
PETA and Poe? Oh, woe. The always outrageous People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals made the always financially strapped Edgar Allan Poe House an offer last week that, apparently, the latter can refuse. PETA officials pledged an unspecified amount of money to help keep the Poe House open now that it's lost funding from Baltimore City and is subsisting on the kindness of strangers. The catch, though, is that the house would have to display a PETA poster, one that plays off a famous Poe short story: "The Tell-Tale Heart of a Meat-Eater," goes the ad, which features a drawing of a rather distressed Poe-like man clutching his chest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | April 4, 2012
With Colton gone, all the drama has been sucked out of this show.  Back from Tribal Council, Jay and Troyzan are talking about voting Jonas off, and how important it is that a girl be voted off this week. They're totally right; if their alliance is going to work, the women in it need to be willing to vote the other women out. Product Placement Treemail! They'll be getting themselves some soda pop for this reward challenge. The challenge is sliding down a giant wooden waterslide (which seems like a really bad idea; maybe it only looks like wood)
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BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Clark and Kenneth R. Clark,Chicago Tribune | July 6, 1991
&TC NEW YORK -- Anyone who thinks movies are free of the commercials that clutter television never saw "Superman," "E.T." or "Ghost."Through use of props and signs worked into the action, these blockbusters openly plugged, among other products, Marlboro cigarettes, which Margot Kidder, as Lois Lane, chain-smoked; Reese's Pieces, which titillated E.T.'s sweet tooth; and Reeboks, favored by Patrick Swayze just before he was plunged into the afterlife.Product...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
PETA and Poe? Oh, woe. The always outrageous People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals made the always financially strapped Edgar Allan Poe House an offer last week that, apparently, the latter can refuse. PETA officials pledged an unspecified amount of money to help keep the Poe House open now that it's lost funding from Baltimore City and is subsisting on the kindness of strangers. The catch, though, is that the house would have to display a PETA poster, one that plays off a famous Poe short story: "The Tell-Tale Heart of a Meat-Eater," goes the ad, which features a drawing of a rather distressed Poe-like man clutching his chest.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Detectives in the HBO crime series The Wire go after bad guys in Baltimore wearing shirts and tactical gear made by Under Armour. The thugs in the television show wear hats and hoodie sweat shirts manufactured by the sportswear company. Golf characters in a Tiger Woods Golf video game play longer and better in hot weather when they put on an Under Armour polo-style shirt. And in the movie Gridiron Gang, the team of troubled youths and their coach, played by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, hit the field in Under Armour uniforms.
FEATURES
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | April 3, 1999
Holy product placement!Moviegoers who caught "EDtv" during its opening weekend couldn't help but notice the number of name-brand products featured in the film.For those not familiar with the concept of "EDtv," it's the tale of Ed, a regular guy who agrees to let a cable TV channel broadcast his life, 24 hours a day.Ed eats Pop Tarts for breakfast and drinks lots of Pepsi. His girlfriend, Shari, delivers packages for UPS, wearing the company's trademark brown uniform.Factor in the dozens of companies -- including Calgon, Saturn, Maytag and Trojan -- who buy commercial time on Ed's TV show, and who could blame moviegoers for assuming serious cash was made from product placement?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 19, 1994
Internal memos say that Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. spent more than $950,000 in a span of four years to feature its cigarette brands in more than 20 movies -- including payments of at least $300,000 to action film star Sylvester Stallone.The payments took the form of checks, cash and merchandise -- including jewelry and automobiles for such stars as Paul Newman, Sean Connery and Mr. Stallone -- over the years 1979 to 1983, the documents say. Product placement, which involves payments for display of brand-name merchandise in films, is a legal and potentially large source of revenue for filmmakers.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
Leaders of the U.S. cigar industry have pledged to stop placing their products in movies and on television, a controversial practice that has come under mounting attacks from members of Congress and anti-tobacco organizations fearful of the impact of Hollywood on children.The board of directors of the Cigar Association of America, the industry trade group whose members produce more than 95 percent of cigars sold in the United States, has amended its guidelines on advertising standards to "admonish" its members to halt the practice, which cigar makers had employed in such high-profile films as "Independence Day" and the television show "Friends."
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 2005
ATLANTA - Buttoned-down UPS is handing video gamers the keys to its boxy brown delivery trucks. In return, it expects excessive speeds, dent-free driving and a whole lot of brand awareness. The delivery giant paid to have a depiction of a UPS delivery truck embedded in the latest edition of a popular racing video game for Xbox and PlayStation2 console systems. The game, NASCAR 06: Total Team Control, is expected to be on store shelves nationwide by today. Price not disclosed UPS wouldn't disclose the price for the product placement, but spokeswoman Susan Rosenberg said the cost exceeds what UPS shells out for a single airing of a national television spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | June 12, 2005
Celebrity culture be damned - stars were a lot more precious when we didn't know every blasted thing about them. Proof lies in a creaky, 50-year-old "reality" series whose episodes today look primitive, naive and so powerfully heart-tugging that you can't watch just one. This Is Your Life had star biographies pretty much to itself at its NBC television debut in 1952, after sliding over from radio with host Ralph Edwards. He'd surprise celebrities in a live broadcast by luring them to a studio under false pretenses, then presenting a parade of their family, friends, long-lost loved ones and other lives touched, in the most sentimental fashion imaginable.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Detectives in the HBO crime series The Wire go after bad guys in Baltimore wearing shirts and tactical gear made by Under Armour. The thugs in the television show wear hats and hoodie sweat shirts manufactured by the sportswear company. Golf characters in a Tiger Woods Golf video game play longer and better in hot weather when they put on an Under Armour polo-style shirt. And in the movie Gridiron Gang, the team of troubled youths and their coach, played by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, hit the field in Under Armour uniforms.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
They've been seen on pregnant bellies and tattooed on foreheads. They've invaded bathroom stalls, cellular phones and doctors' offices. They've sneaked their way into movies, TV shows, novels and even Broadway plays. They are ads and, come September, they'll be more maddeningly ubiquitous than ever. In the fall, a laser-imprinted CBS eye logo and slogan will make their appearance on eggs in major markets around the country as the network launches 35 million "egg-vertisements" to generate publicity for its fall television lineup.
FEATURES
By CHASE SQUIRES and CHASE SQUIRES,ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | December 20, 2005
Dawna Stone had one mission: Get the job. Though The Apprentice: Martha Stewart - NBC's festival of product placement - never exploded in the ratings, Stone has been burning up the screen from the start. Others played games, built alliances, schemed, cut up, got into shouting matches, got into unsavory predicaments and got drunk. Stone was a rock. After treating every day of her two months on the Mark Burnett reality show like the job interview of her life, the St. Petersburg magazine publisher finds out tomorrow if her strategy worked.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 2005
ATLANTA - Buttoned-down UPS is handing video gamers the keys to its boxy brown delivery trucks. In return, it expects excessive speeds, dent-free driving and a whole lot of brand awareness. The delivery giant paid to have a depiction of a UPS delivery truck embedded in the latest edition of a popular racing video game for Xbox and PlayStation2 console systems. The game, NASCAR 06: Total Team Control, is expected to be on store shelves nationwide by today. Price not disclosed UPS wouldn't disclose the price for the product placement, but spokeswoman Susan Rosenberg said the cost exceeds what UPS shells out for a single airing of a national television spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | June 12, 2005
Celebrity culture be damned - stars were a lot more precious when we didn't know every blasted thing about them. Proof lies in a creaky, 50-year-old "reality" series whose episodes today look primitive, naive and so powerfully heart-tugging that you can't watch just one. This Is Your Life had star biographies pretty much to itself at its NBC television debut in 1952, after sliding over from radio with host Ralph Edwards. He'd surprise celebrities in a live broadcast by luring them to a studio under false pretenses, then presenting a parade of their family, friends, long-lost loved ones and other lives touched, in the most sentimental fashion imaginable.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | September 11, 2001
BOSTON - Now from the land of Shakespeare, Milton and Bridget Jones comes a literary breakthrough that gives new meaning to the phrase "commercial fiction." The Brits have given us a work of fiction that is a commercial. Not long ago, Bulgari, the maker of fine jewelry, went out in search of a novel (literally) way to place its products. Bulgari's idea was dropped, along with a trademark perfume, on Fay Weldon's London doorstep. Ms. Weldon, a member of the brazen hussy school of feminist satirists, happily adopted the concept of "product placement."
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
They've been seen on pregnant bellies and tattooed on foreheads. They've invaded bathroom stalls, cellular phones and doctors' offices. They've sneaked their way into movies, TV shows, novels and even Broadway plays. They are ads and, come September, they'll be more maddeningly ubiquitous than ever. In the fall, a laser-imprinted CBS eye logo and slogan will make their appearance on eggs in major markets around the country as the network launches 35 million "egg-vertisements" to generate publicity for its fall television lineup.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 3, 1991
American troops are drinking sodas in our living rooms. They are somewhere in the Persian Gulf war zone, though precisely where is not clear. But precisely what they are drinking is as clear as the name written across the soda cans.Think of this as The Bombing Pause That Refreshes. The troops are watching the Super Bowl on TV while a TV camera shows them drinking the sodas. The scene is shown at halftime of the ballgame, but it will be repeated on TV news shows for the rest of the week.A nation glued to television sets is supposed to make subconscious links: Here are our kids, and here is their soda.
FEATURES
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | April 3, 1999
Holy product placement!Moviegoers who caught "EDtv" during its opening weekend couldn't help but notice the number of name-brand products featured in the film.For those not familiar with the concept of "EDtv," it's the tale of Ed, a regular guy who agrees to let a cable TV channel broadcast his life, 24 hours a day.Ed eats Pop Tarts for breakfast and drinks lots of Pepsi. His girlfriend, Shari, delivers packages for UPS, wearing the company's trademark brown uniform.Factor in the dozens of companies -- including Calgon, Saturn, Maytag and Trojan -- who buy commercial time on Ed's TV show, and who could blame moviegoers for assuming serious cash was made from product placement?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 21, 1999
Joe Stein got a big surprise last fall when his 11-year-old son Noah asked him for help with homework. On the page of Noah's sixth-grade math textbook was "what looked like an ad for a chain electronics store," said Stein.Going through the rest of the book, Stein discovered references to a wide array of brand-name consumer products, from Nike and Gatorade to Disneyland and Topps baseball cards, many of which appeared in illustrations as well. And that made him angry."He has to use this textbook, and he has to do the work that is intertwined with these advertisements," said Stein, whose son attends middle school in Albany, Calif.
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